Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Armadale
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Unhappy porters milk paints

    does anyone know of a cheaper way of using porters milk paint than using their underseal and over seal,
    I love the look, but it seems not to like shellac as a sealer and if you dont seal it it shows every fingerprint.
    to buy their sealers makes most of my jobs not very proffitable.

    astrid

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many
     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    The Fabulous Gold-plated Coast.
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,798
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Boiled linseed oil makes an effective sealer for their paints. It does however give the finish a more even and glossy look which may or may not be what you had in mind.

    Greg

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Armadale
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    should you put this on raw timber.?
    last time i sealed with shellac and it went blochy, must have been the water in the paint reacting with the shellac.
    in the end i sealed with wax but wasnt entirely happy
    astrid

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    The Fabulous Gold-plated Coast.
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,798
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The best results are to apply the paint over the freshest timber possible (ie, timber freshly sanded is better than timber sanded a month or so earlier).

    Two coats are usually required to get an even coverage, although this might vary with how thick you mixed the paint. After the paint dries brush on linseed oil, allow it to soak in, wipe off (carefully!) the excess. For an antique look you can wipe a bit more vigorously in areas where it would be normal for some wear to show, causing the paint to be mostly wiped away.

    When the oil polymerises (fancy word for hardens) in a couple of days the finish will be reasonably durable and have a 'period' look.

    Greg

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Armadale
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    thanks greg
    thats great, my first use was on a stripped bakers cupboard, lovely thing in baltic lots of drawers
    I think the mistake was sealing with shellac although the bloke at porters said it would be ok
    next time i'll put it on raw sanded timber,
    the look I like is the farmhouse look, carefully rubbed back in appropriate places

    ta
    astrid

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Kilmore, near Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I haven't used it since doing Porter's finishing course but from what I know of those folks, if they say 'use this or that' I would .... I am sure there would be many methods for sealing milk paints and I guess the web will reveal them .. (BTW I bought milk paint from the US for cheaper than I could here) but when it comes to their paints, I reckon they know their stuff inside out.... actually, I think they make their paints themselves.

    I have been researching making kitchen cabinets with Milk paint finishes and was advised against it due to the soaps and fats causing greasy blemishes. From memory, it was suggested that I use polyurethane of some sort to seal it. Haven't had time to trial it yet.

    FInally... and I am NOT saying anyone here does this, but I have seen far too many jobs when ppl try to age things, with totally unconvincing results ... For example, many people rub back the middle of each door panel on a dresser... I just can't imagine a circumstance where this is likely to happen, or where a surface is dented with the same dent and the same spacing ... I use this simple rule - can I imagine a story about the piece of furniture, that makes sense of the rubbing, scrapes, 'repairs' and dings? We eat at a 250+ year old scrubbed pine table - at some stage in its history, a candle had burned right down to the wood and left a blackened, divot ... over time the divot has been rubbed by hands and polish cloths etc. and has left it the shiniest part of the top ... whenever folks visit and we eat at the table, their fingers invariably trace the lines of that burn .... it is one of those so called imperfections that make our table perfect

    It is a real challenge to re-create a period look and feel convincingly .... when it's well done, it really is spectacular
    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Armadale
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    re your comment on artificially distressing,
    I totally agree, it takes skill and sensitivity to age a restored piece.
    the other is called shabby chic

    astrid

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    inner city sydney
    Age
    45
    Posts
    90
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    if the shellac was properly thinned down to seal it shouldn't have presented any problems...
    If you still have the shellac on and don't want to remove it, just try keying it with rough wool to hold the paint evenly.
    I had this problem with not thinning the shellac enough and water based stains

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    871
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    First of all, I am not an expert on this. I am merely regurgitating what I have read in various places...

    You might want to refer to an article on using Milk Paint by Mike Dunbar in Fine Woodworking Issue 136.

    There is only one change that I know about. Mike apparently now uses Danish Oil as a finishing sealer.

    You may want to consider using products other than Porters or even making your own. There are plenty of recipes on the internet.

    The Old Fashioned Paint Company in the US sells milk paint in powdered form. I imagine there would be no problem shipping this here as there are no nasty solvents.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Kilmore, near Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I get Old Fashioned Milk Paints powdered paint delivered to Oz.
    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Kilmore, near Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by astrid View Post
    re your comment on artificially distressing,
    I totally agree, it takes skill and sensitivity to age a restored piece.
    the other is called shabby chic

    astrid
    ...and isn't "shabby" being extremely kind to most pieces called thus?
    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

Similar Threads

  1. Crystal Paints decking oil anone used it
    By aussieorchid in forum FLOORING, DECKING, STUMPS, etc.
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27th Feb 2007, 02:55 PM
  2. Natural Paints - Seeking opinions & experiences
    By SteveAndBelle in forum PAINTING, PLASTERING, TILING, DECORATING, etc.
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 27th Oct 2006, 03:21 PM
  3. milk on her head
    By Farm boy in forum Hatches, Matches & Dispatches. Birthday greetings and other Touchie-feelie stuff.
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 21st Nov 2005, 09:47 PM
  4. Durability of Milk Paint
    By Bunyip in forum FINISHING
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24th May 2004, 04:23 PM
  5. Interior and Exterior Paints
    By Sir Stinkalot in forum PAINTING, PLASTERING, TILING, DECORATING, etc.
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24th Jan 2004, 12:08 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •