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Thread: 10 Amp Welders

  1. #1
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    Default 10 Amp Welders

    Around 12 years ago I attended a father's day expo at the local Mitre 10 and there was a Ryobi rep selling various Ryobi welders including one that according to the rep was the "most powerful" arc welder (160A) available in Australia that could be run using a 10 amp plug.

    However yesterday while browsing in Bunnings I noticed the welder (170A) illustrated below and it also uses a 10 amp plug.

    Is there a limit (amperage on the welder) using 10 amps? Why do some require 15 amps then?

    Cheers
    Graeme.


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    lower the volts and you get higher amps...


    The only way to get more output is to make the device more efficient...

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    I saw them 2 the other day and was wondering if they were an dc inverter welder.They are quite a bit dearer than the $100 10amp stick welders and if they are an inverter thats how they get more amps - more efficient .I did look all over it and the box but it didnt say ,and the ever helpfully staff were pretty scarce .Get nothing when I google it .I.ll ask em next time .
    --- mat -

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    The first thing I'd be looking at is the duty cycle, doubt that it'll be very much @ 4.0mm

    It really comes down to what you want to use it for and for how long.

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    I can't say for sure but reckon the built in inverter would have to be on the money.

    Otherwise it is difficult to see how the machine can offer a genuine 170 amps as on a normal transformer of this rating,a 15 amp plug will be required.

    Normally somewhere on the packing box or in the advertising blurb there would be the blurb trumpeting the use of an inverter.

    Taking another tack ,it may be that this unit has slipped through on the Australian Standards and may well be inappropriately equipped with a 10 amp plug instead of 15amp.I would expect that the fuses would blow or the breakers would trip at high output ,but never say never.

    If so avoid it, as it is possible that it could burn your house down,by reason of the heavy current draw overheating your internal wiring circuits to the point where a fire starts.

    As DJ points out the duty cycle will over a good clue.

    Cheers
    Grahame

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    It's simple maths really. Drawing 10 amps at 240V is 2400W. Drawing 170A at 14V also gives you 2400W. So if we assume the transformer has no losses, then a transformer delivering 170A @ 14V will be drawing 10A from the 240V outlet.

    To account for transformer losses you simple lower the welding voltage (say to 10 or 12V) and you can still keep the total power of the unit at or under 2400W.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
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    arc volts should be varying between 20 and 30 though for a good weld??

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    Had another quick look at it today but the two young salesmen on duty knew nothing about the WeldCorp range other than they are new to Bunnings.

    Not much I could glean from the box other than it's made in Italy, definitely a transformer based welder and has a dual-voltage toggle switch at the top right-hand corner of the console. What exactly does that mean?


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    Well $279 seems to be quite cheap for a transformer welder and Bunnings seem be OK with replacing tools that die within the warranty.I,ve wanted a transformer for a few years but keep putting it off as they seem to gradually be getting cheaper.Wonder how long the warranty is ,if its 2 or 3 years like some of bunnings tools would be a good buy .
    --- mat --

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    The switch would be for the input voltage..240V single phase or 415V three phase...Why such a small machine would have a three phase input is beyond me...(Euro voltages are 230V and 400V respectively)

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    Think you will find the specs. on this
    scan0001.pdf
    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and Im not so sure about the universe.


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    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    The switch would be for the input voltage..240V single phase or 415V three phase...Why such a small machine would have a three phase input is beyond me...(Euro voltages are 230V and 400V respectively)
    Doesn't need to be three phase to use 415v it can just be between two of the phases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn k View Post
    Doesn't need to be three phase to use 415v it can just be between two of the phases.
    I know that, but you can't just get two of the three phases wired into your house...It is three phase or nothing...

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Spencer View Post
    Think you will find the specs. on this
    scan0001.pdf

    I hate to think what the quality of the tranformer is....170 amp and only weighs 17kg... Our old CIG 140 amp from the early 1980's was thirty or more kg..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Spencer View Post
    Think you will find the specs. on this
    scan0001.pdf
    Looks like its not an inverter welder then as the subsequent models mention inverter in their names .Expensive for an ordinary arc welder and probably only runs 4.0 rods at 170 amps if its on the 3phase 400v option .

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    Ok its easy then.
    It is switched for dual voltage but you can only plug into a 10 amp outlet. The switch marked 415 won't be connected to the transformer taps.

    There's no way it will pull 170 amps from a 10 amp outlet

    If it was wired to 3 phase ie, 415 volts, yes you can have 170 amps, but then look at the size of the thing.It does not appear even big enough to have a fan built in to it.

    How long can you run a bead at the full 170 amp.? It does not appear to have the fan so, how does it it cool iteslf? By normal air convection. It follows, then that the duty cycle will be very low.If its 17kg and a transformer it will be alumininium wound.Bingo ,very poor current density as compared to copper wound.

    As far as transformer losses are concerned calculate around 25% loss of efficientcy as heat.. output voltage between 45 to 70 odd volts - limited to 80 by law in a welder.
    Maybe my maths are crap but I don't believe 170 amps from a 10 outlet unless technology has come a very long way transformer wise. Our Italian friends make wonderful cars but truly the welders are just so,so.

    Its a case of buyer beware until more information presents itself.

    Grahame

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