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  1. #1
    Dave J Guest

    Default Drill press foot switch (safety)

    Hi,
    I came across this nasty accident yesterday on another forum and today he posted photos of it. He was changing a drill bit and accidentally stood on the switch. If you have one (like I do) it's something to keep in mind as it only takes a second to loose concentration. I am planning on putting a cover on mine as my son had a near miss the other week.

    Here is the link to it.
    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?p=733603&posted=1

    Dave

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  3. #2
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    ouch .

    The best foot switch is the one that stops the drill.

    Kev
    "Outside of a dog a book is man's best friend ,inside a dog it's too dark to read"
    Groucho Marx

  4. #3
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    Ouch! I read the whole thread. Some good ideas and good warnings - and a bit of crap mixed in for good measure.
    However, While I personally don't like foot switches (I'm clumsy), I do like emergency stop buttons.
    A drill press is one machine that I think should come with a stop switch aroing face height - to be hit by your forehead. There have been plenty of times I had my workpiece snatched out of the vice or the vice and workpiece pulled around by a drill with me haning on. My other hand holding the feed lever and not game to let that go because the whole lot would then lift off the table and move even more unpredictably. At least when it is "pinned" to the table, you know where is can go.
    On my old drill press I could stall the motor in any speed setting in that predicament - as long as the workpiece was at least 200mm long from the drill centre - or small enough for me to hang onto the vice handle.
    Once I got a finger caught between a workpiece and the column. On that occasion I was able to knock the lever switch to off with my eyebrow after a few goes.
    The Servian won't stop and doens't slip a belt in low gear if it grabs - its done it once already (no hands in the way - it pulled a workpiece out of the vice and hit it against the column, breaking the large drill.
    So I'm looking for a small enclosure to mount a stop switch where I can reach it with my head.
    By the way, I thought about a foot emergency switch or knee switch, but I think upsetting your stance or balance would be just too risky.
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  5. #4
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    On the front of the bench at knee height is a good place .
    We had emergency stop switches on our drills some on the floor next to the floor table and one or two on the front of the bench at knee height on others.

    Kev
    "Outside of a dog a book is man's best friend ,inside a dog it's too dark to read"
    Groucho Marx

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    Default

    Thanks Dave......I just up-chucked into my coffee......Unfortunantly I have a very weak stomach...
    Oh well off to brush my teeth..
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  7. #6
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    Thank God for O.H&S, A drill press is one machine that should not have a foot pedal, even if you had a dozen energency stop buttons your reaction would be too slow to stop this. As far as other items spinning around, what are drill press vices used for?

  8. #7
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    HI,
    OUCH BLOODY OUCH THOSE ACCIDENTS WOULD HAVE BLOODY HURT.
    Personally I don't like the Idea of having a Start Switch on the Floor. A Stop Switch on the Floor is probably not such a bad idea, but if something does go wrong You have to be able to get to it.
    The NSW OHS and QLD OHS must be different looking at the Hare & Forbes School - Tafe Equipment Drilling Machines | machineryhouse.com.au have a look at where the Emergency Stop Switches are Mounted. I have a Steelmaster SM-B32 Drill Press SM-B32 Steelmaster Pedistal Drilling Machine. Industrial Belt Driven. 4 M.T. Spindle. - Asset Plant & Machinery The machines wattage to is 1100W not the 1.5KW that they say). I have had to hit the Emergency Stop a number of times and I am glad of where it is, because I have always been able to get to it in a hurry. The Accidents I have had on it have only been slight - touch wood they stay that way.

    P.S. The Clausing Drill Press looks good, I have never seen one before.
    Last edited by steran50; 22nd Jan 2012 at 09:47 AM. Reason: clausing
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  9. #8
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    Default Hauser Jig Borer

    We have discussed recently on this forum the beauty of the Hauser Jig Borer.
    Way back when..... in a past time... I was operating this machine, an accidental bump with the foot onto the floor operated on- off switch, sent a spindle mounted, dial indicator hurtling across the Toolroom.
    It was like a dangerous projectile, & fortunately did not connect with anyone.
    Stuffed the indicator
    regards
    Bruce

  10. #9
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    Outch... I've seen better ways of not losing the chuck key..

    Regards
    Ray

  11. #10
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    It's not just the workshop, we had similar excitement when the dog decided to flop down on the sewing machine foot when the wife was threading the needle.
    Regards
    Hugh

    Enough is enough, more than enough is too much.

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    Default Nrb

    I have a large push switch (around MM diam.) just below waist hight,I got this off a old machine where I used to work,push it in and all stops,release and the drill press runs.
    Works for me for many years

  13. #12
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    It can be hard to guard Machine Tools due to the fact that they generally need a high amount of operator interreaction, Drill Presses are a good example. They range from small bench models to large radial types, the newer ones come with a variety of mechanical guards, some better than others but usually just get in the way or are not practical for the different jobs that the Drill is used for and usually are removed or overridden.
    As suggested in this post a well placed Emergency Stop makes good sense and how it is interfaced into the Drills Control depends on the complexity of the circuit and the relevent Australian Standards, if used in Industry then best practise is to use the Standards. If its for home use compliance to Standards is not manditory but still a good way to go as you will know that if you hit the Emergency Stop it will work.
    I attach a catalogue from a company called Schmersal and they have a Safety Foot Switch that has a Emergency Latching Function so that if you get into trouble pressing down hard on the peddle will latch it into the open state and you need to manually reset the Foot Switch to release the Emergency Stop Function. I have used and recommended these types of units for a number of years in Industry, they are expensive so not for everybody but just showing that there are items in Industry that can be used in safety applications like this.

    Regards,
    Keith.
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    "" I have been running a table saw without a guard for 26 years and never come close to cutting myself. ""


    but one day it might happen....the odds are with the blade..its sharp doesnt discriminate , and just cant think for it's self ...if a finger (or 2) are in the way then ......


    as for foot switch on drill presses to operate ...mmm I dont think its a good idea because of the potential to accidently step on it while your hands are in the way

  15. #14
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    Default stop

    The lathes at TAFE have a emergengy stop bar along the base , you stand on it to stop the lathe . But a teacher told me that many of them don't work

    A chap was killed in a lathe accident in Melbourne in the last 24 months .

    The camel back drills have a large bevel gear spinning around about 4 inches from the hand lever that you pull to engage the feed .nasty it could be . I'm thinking of making a guard up .

    MIKE

  16. #15
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eskimo View Post
    "" I have been running a table saw without a guard for 26 years and never come close to cutting myself. ""


    but one day it might happen....the odds are with the blade..its sharp doesnt discriminate , and just cant think for it's self ...if a finger (or 2) are in the way then ......


    as for foot switch on drill presses to operate ...mmm I dont think its a good idea because of the potential to accidently step on it while your hands are in the way
    Hi Eskimo,
    It could happen, but I have always used push sticks if anything is close and always think of the blade as hot. When I was 18 I started out my own small bossiness making wooden toys and furniture and spent more time than I could remember in front of the table saw, so I learned to respect it.
    My Grandfather (who built my first table saw) is 90 and still has every finger after running one for 50-60 years, so it can be done, LOL.

    As for the drill I only fitted a foot switch about 2 years ago after reading about them, and it makes things easier for some jobs. But after thinking about that guys accident I will be changing mine to an enclosed cover you need to put your foot right into.

    Dave

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