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cultana
25th Apr 2010, 12:34 AM
Ok I know most same people will be down at the RSL tonight, but it was saner to stay at home. It is all to do with deployments, not mine I am way out of that now, but family, and nights like this get her a bit delicate.

Now I have started a small oyster box and a few things don’t quite gel doing this.

When I dish out the lid/base what is the best way, scraper or use the bowl gouge?
I looked at the Teknatool project page and Michael Stafford in his ‘Turning an End Grain Lidded Box’ uses a bowl gouge to do some/all the roughing out from what I can deduce.

Unfortunately end grain, bowl gouge and me all just do not seem to get along very well.

So how should I do this?
So far I have used a scraper to get the current dishing and it is 10mm in at centre. The outside diam of the piece is 75mm.

oldiephred
25th Apr 2010, 08:59 AM
I have developed a feel for using a oland tool for that type of work and it works well for me. Then again, no one ever accused me of being "normal" when it comes to turning:-

artme
25th Apr 2010, 09:03 AM
You want to make it deeper I take it??

I have tackled this sort of thing witn a parting tool. I just "step" it down to roughly to the depth and shape and then use a bowl gouge to get it to shape. A shearing cut is best. Guess you could also use a scraper.

Ed Reiss
25th Apr 2010, 01:05 PM
Cultana, there is a technique using a spindle gouge...yes, I said a spindle gouge, to hollow out end grain turnings. T he cut itself is initiated from the centerpoint and is almost counterintuitive... a technique that does take a bit of practice to master.

Like Artme said, you can use a bowl gouge and use it as a scraper to take care of the inside of that bowl. An Oland type hollowing tool also does a great job.

Should be a good lookin' bowl when done.

cultana
25th Apr 2010, 01:25 PM
Thanks guys.
Well this my first try at this type of stuff so it is bound to have issues in the finished item.

Now with a bowl gouge do I start from the centre or from the inner edge?

With the scraper I have started fro the centre and so far that seems ok.

Pat
25th Apr 2010, 02:04 PM
I cheat by hollowing out with a suitably sized Forstner bit to nearly the depth required, then refine the hollow with a Bowl gouge for the walls and an Oland tool for the base of the hollow.

NeilS
25th Apr 2010, 02:58 PM
Cultana, there is a technique using a spindle gouge...yes, I said a spindle gouge, to hollow out end grain turnings. T he cut itself is initiated from the centerpoint and is almost counterintuitive... a technique that does take a bit of practice to master.



Ed, perhaps the Raffan 'back cut'. Video clip here (http://www.turningtools.co.uk/videos/videos.html#raffan).

....

artme
25th Apr 2010, 03:06 PM
Was going to suggest that Neil but I thought it might frighten Cultana! :q

Using the method I described I usuall work from the bottom up, but it can be done the other way.

A shallow fluted spindle gouge could also be used after removing mot of the material with whatever method takes your fancy.

cultana
25th Apr 2010, 05:30 PM
Niel, thanks. At first it was OK because I could not load the clip. So it was not scary. Then I used the mac and watched it :oo:

I have only been wood turning for a short time I don't need to be scared off just yet.


Was going to suggest that Neil but I thought it might frighten Cultana! :q
Thanks for the concern!!!

Using the method I described I usuall work from the bottom up, but it can be done the other way.

A shallow fluted spindle gouge could also be used after removing mot of the material with whatever method takes your fancy.

Now if people here had told me how scary this whole thing was I would have avoided it completely.
I suppose I will have to make a bowl or two as well just to be fully indoctrinated to turning.:rolleyes:

Thanks now to go get fully scared with that bowl gouge and end grain combination..

NeilS
25th Apr 2010, 09:41 PM
Niel, thanks. At first it was OK because I could not load the clip. So it was not scary. Then I used the mac and watched it :oo:



Sorry, Cultana. Store that away to have a play with another time.

If you don't have anyone to show you how to use gouges properly at this stage, just use scrapers. That's the way it was done for centuries.

......

cultana
25th Apr 2010, 10:06 PM
Neil, no big problem.
I tried it but the gouge decided to do a bit of walking. :(
End of try 1.

I also think the bowl gouge has too much of a point on it so I will need to regrind it.

tea lady
25th Apr 2010, 10:31 PM
With the scraper I have started fro the centre and so far that seems ok.:2tsup:that's right. You start fro\m the center. That way you are still cutting "down the grain". I wish you could see Ken Wraight in action. He has a really great way for beginners to do end grain boxes. Hed uses a spindle gouge or a detail gouge (would you believe.) I think there are a few pics of someone at the turnaround and Jeffersons.:think:

:shrug: the only pic I had was this. Yvonne at the Kaiwa Turnon2009, hollowing her first end grain box under the close guidance of Ken W.:cool:
http://www.woodworkforums.com/attachments/f8/126133d1262868516t-kiewa-turn-get-together-2009-pics-kiewa16.jpg

Anyway, at least it shows the angle of the gouge on the rest. It is virtually horizontal on the center line. You start with it n the center with the bevel kind rubbing, with the flute at 45ish ° facing you. You slowly pull the tip towards you following the bottom of the bowl, while the handle is kinda pushed away from you. Coming the the wall of the bowl you have the angle such that the corner of the flute closest to you will not hit the wall. (Causing a catch. :C ) You then draw the gouge straight out running up the side of the bowl or box.

:doh: We're gonna need photos aren't we? :rolleyes::)

cultana
25th Apr 2010, 11:25 PM
:
Anyway, at least it shows the angle of the gouge on the rest. It is virtually horizontal on the center line. You start with it n the center with the bevel kind rubbing, with the flute at 45ish ° facing you. You slowly pull the tip towards you following the bottom of the bowl, while the handle is kinda pushed away from you. Coming the the wall of the bowl you have the angle such that the corner of the flute closest to you will not hit the wall. (Causing a catch. :C ) You then draw the gouge straight out running up the side of the bowl or box.

:doh: We're gonna need photos aren't we? :rolleyes::)

Yes we, (me), will need pics of what you just described, won't we, (me). :D

Also looks like I will need a bowl gouge grinding gismo and several different ground spindle and bowl gouges.

I might get the feeling it is time to slide back to that dark and gloomy place where the dark forces work with just hand tools again...

tea lady
25th Apr 2010, 11:47 PM
Yes we, (me), will need pics of what you just described, won't we, (me). :D

Also looks like I will need a bowl gouge grinding gismo and several different ground spindle and bowl gouges.

I might get the feeling it is time to slide back to that dark and gloomy place where the dark forces work with just hand tools again...Don't need that many tools. You can do it with a spindle gouge. And I only recently got me a grinding gizmo. (Although I did periodically get the grind fixed up at 's place.:rolleyes: ) will try and take pics in the morning. Might not get to it until later in the week though.:C:)

cultana
26th Apr 2010, 12:01 AM
Don't need that many tools. You can do it with a spindle gouge.
Yes I could but it has taken on a long thin ponity look so needs a re grind. The bowl gouge is in the same shape too pointy.
And I only recently got me a grinding gizmo. (Although I did periodically get the grind fixed up at 's place.:rolleyes: ) Cheat!:o
will try and take pics in the morning. Might not get to it until later in the week though.:C:)
Thanks about the pics..

cultana
26th Apr 2010, 02:59 AM
Just a couple of pics of the finished top piece.
The inside is showing a bit of moisture loss so I will have to seal theses soon.
the pieces in the chuck is my start for the bottom half of this.

As for the bowl gouge after looking at a clip that was posted way back here somewhere, this one:
Podcast #37: Turning Tools — Sharpen Your Skills with Sharp Tools — Woodworking Online (http://www.woodworkingonline.com/2008/09/23/podcast-37-turning-tools-sharpen-your-skills-with-sharp-tools)

I think I do need to re sharpen/shape my gouge. very interesting but long clip.

artme
26th Apr 2010, 08:40 AM
That is looking really good Cultana!!:2tsup::2tsup::2tsup: No doubt about the beauty of growthrings when you turn this way.

I bought a shrpening jig called a Heligrind. It was specifically designed for spindle and bowl gouges. Does a great job on the bowl gouges but I don't like the pointy nose grind I get on spindle gouges.

NeilS
26th Apr 2010, 04:04 PM
I also think the bowl gouge has too much of a point on it so I will need to regrind it.



Pointy is good, if it is like any of these (http://www.woodcentral.com/newforum/grinds.shtml).

Flatter is OK for the inside bottom of bowls, but only if you have a spare bowl gouge to grind like that. If you only have one bowl gouge, try one of the grinds on the above website.

.....

cultana
26th Apr 2010, 10:32 PM
Pointy is good, if it is like any of these (http://www.woodcentral.com/newforum/grinds.shtml).
.....

:roflmao: If only it had a resemblance to any one of those...

cultana
27th Apr 2010, 12:24 PM
Well fir a first and a really novice starter I finally managed to complete my first little box.
It had a few, (lots), of learning curves but worth the effort form my perspective.
I may try a bowl next it sounds easier.

Anyway with all its mistakes and errors here is the finished product finished in a coat of poly and a heavy buffing.

tea lady
27th Apr 2010, 05:44 PM
:2tsup: Looks pretty nice to me.:cool::U

NeilS
28th Apr 2010, 09:34 PM
....:2tsup:


.....

cultana
29th Apr 2010, 02:10 AM
Thanks TL and Neil.
Give me a encouragement to flounder onward with this wood turning affliction.:D

artme
29th Apr 2010, 08:39 AM
:2tsup::2tsup::2tsup: