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View Full Version : Competition requirements - natural edge



sjm
27th Jan 2012, 08:20 AM
The definition of a natural edge is pretty clear when it comes to bowl rims, and voids in hollow vessels, but I was wondering if the voids left by the seed pods in a banksia would be classed as a natural edge? I'm not talking about the rough outside "mouths", but the smooth internal edges after all the fur has been roughed off, as shown in the image below. What do you think?

Sturdee
27th Jan 2012, 08:58 AM
I think that makes it a natural edged hole not a natural edge.


Peter.

brendan stemp
27th Jan 2012, 09:32 AM
I think your drawing a long bow here. While you may be able to exploit a loop hole in the definition I certainly don't think it fits the intention or is within the spirit of the category.

Perhaps it could be argued that the edge of the hole isn't in fact natural because it has been turned; the natural edge of the seed compartment does not look like these holes.

If you were to enter this in the AWTEx (for instance) I think you would go a long way to muddying the waters and forcing the organisers to lengthen the description of this category. This would just complicate issues even further. Or worse still, you could find the piece disqualified.

Enter this piece into the goblet section, simple. However I can see there is quite a bit you could do with the natural edges of the banksia pods that would keep your work well within the definition. But then there may be the arguement "is it WOOD turning".

sjm
27th Jan 2012, 11:33 AM
.....
But then there may be the arguement "is it WOOD turning".
You raise a number of valid points, and I thank you for that, but as for the question of whether it's wood? Well it's natural, has a fibrous cellular structure (grain), it grows on a tree, it is self supporting, it's combustible, it rots, etc, etc... if it's not wood, then what is it?

And how does it differ from something like the hollow form below. Would this piece fall within the natural edge category? As I see it, the only difference is that the banksia pods have a lot of small holes, rather than a few large ones.

brendan stemp
27th Jan 2012, 12:49 PM
You raise a number of valid points, and I thank you for that, but as for the question of whether it's wood? Well it's natural, has a fibrous cellular structure (grain), it grows on a tree, it is self supporting, it's combustible, it rots, etc, etc... if it's not wood, then what is it?

.

Ah, the problem with the written word. I should have done this: "...is it WOOD turning" :D but I couldn't find those symbols that reinforce I was being mischievous. I mentioned this because I have been wondering how far I would get if I entered a bowl made of gum nuts and resin. In other words, I would pass banksia pods as being wood if I were an official in a comp.

To the HF you have included. Not sure, I will give it more thought.