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Scott
14th Aug 2012, 11:16 AM
It's been irritating me for while now. I'm talking about screws used to attach faceplates to your work. I've had an annoying amount of screws shear off when screwing them into the work, whilst turning and other inopportune moments crucial to the success of the finished product. Then yesterday I read an article in the latest issue of "Woodturning Magazine" (no. 243) related to mounting the faceplate with screws which read:


Avoid deck screws, dry wall screws and brittle high pitch rate fasteners.

This is my dilemma. I have used dozens of different types of screws with no luck. I'm annoyed at having to extract screws from my work that have snapped off.

Can anyone recommend a high quality screw they use for attaching faceplates that doesn't fail repeatedly?

And secondly (this is an afterthought) do you pre-drill a pilot hole before attaching the faceplate?

Thanks in advance.

Paul39
14th Aug 2012, 11:54 AM
I like #10 Phillips head wood screws that penetrate about 1 inch into the wood. How many depends on the size of the blank. Larger than 20 inches, more and bigger screws. 1/4 inch X 1 1/4 or 1 1/2 inch long

Also the longer and bigger diameter blank needs a bigger face plate.

Some folks like # 10 sheet metal screws. I think the common wood screw with the thicker unthreaded part extending into the wood is stronger as it would resist shearing off if one has a bad catch.

If hard dry wood, drill a pilot hole and lubricate with whatever suits. Oil, Danish oil, candle wax, bees wax.

If you have a bad catch and the piece stays on the face plate, the mounting is OK.

I also use the tail stock to hold as long as possible. If doing a bowl in one fixing, I screw the bottom to the face plate, and run the tail stock up to the face with a live center. I do the outside and rim of the bowl, sand and put on the first coat of Tung oil.

Then I bring the tool rest across the front of the bowl almost touching the live center and hollow as much as I can reach, leaving a thin spigot up to the center. I then tighten the screws and slide the tail stock out of the way, move the tool rest across the front of the bowl opening and take down the spigot, sometimes nibbling at the base, sometimes gently from the top.

I then finish hollowing, sand and finish. To remove the bowl from the screwed on waste part I make a groove with a parting tool taking side by side steps to leave room for the tool until it gets grabby, then shut off the lathe and use a hack saw to continue around and around until the bowl comes off. It is good to have some padding on the bed and the tool rest stuff out of the way in case the bowl comes off unexpectedly.

I then mount a face plate with a piece of Medium Density Fiberboard turned round and flat. I attach 100 grit paper on the face with double sided carpet tape. The sand paper comes out to the rim of the MDF and I run the bottom of the bowl across the edge at a slight angle rotating the bowl a bit each stroke so that it makes a slight concavity on the bottom.

Then I lay a piece of 150 or 180 grit on a flat and rub the bottom of the bowl on that to get a little flat rim. Then I hand sand the bottom gently with 220 or 240 and hand rub several coats of Tung oil on, letting dry overnight on the last coat. I then sign, number and put the name of wood on concave part of the bottom, let dry and put on another 2 coats of Tung oil.

Skew ChiDAMN!!
14th Aug 2012, 12:04 PM
I reckon you can't go past the #12 Sachys Robertson screws.

Not only do they hold well, but they've a longer re-use life than phillips or flats... less problems with rounding the slots when removing them!

There has been such a demand in the past that Sachys Robertson - who used to only sell in large quantities - have released a smaller woodturners pack for around $14. :wink:

Packs and Specials (http://www.screwit.com.au/online-catalogue/packs-and-specials/pack-specials-multiple-woodturners-pack)

Paul39
14th Aug 2012, 12:32 PM
I reckon you can't go past the #12 Sachys Robertson screws.

Those should do nicely.

Acco
14th Aug 2012, 12:50 PM
What Skew said, they just last and keep on going. I've actually broken more of their drivers than I have of their screws and yes drill a pilot hole.

RETIRED
14th Aug 2012, 01:11 PM
What they all said.

Mulgabill
14th Aug 2012, 01:48 PM
:wts: Absolutely!!

Kidbee
14th Aug 2012, 07:31 PM
I have heard of people using the blue concrete screws that can be bought at Bunnings.

Scott
14th Aug 2012, 08:07 PM
Excellent, thanks for the advice everyone, a pack of the Sachys Robertson screws will be ordered.

vk4
14th Aug 2012, 08:22 PM
When I started turning , about 15 years ago, there was a pack similar to the above , with a sq drive , but the thread had a curved pitch / thread.

Instead of the thread being a hard v from the body , it was curved , making it much fuller, I never had an issue with them, Unfortunately I sold them with my old lathe ,

Now for Face plate work , I use hex head self drilling screws , 25/30mm long.

Jeff
vk4

orraloon
14th Aug 2012, 11:34 PM
Hex head roofing screws. I have never broken one yet and they get reused almost for ever. Very quick and hold like anything.
Regards
John

TTIT
14th Aug 2012, 11:59 PM
I use the same as Skew but the one thing I haven't seen mentioned is to avoid using overly long screws - it's surprising how little you need in the timber to hold securely and there's much less chance of running into the screws with a gouge :;

Sawdust Maker
15th Aug 2012, 07:02 PM
I use the same as Skew but the one thing I haven't seen mentioned is to avoid using overly long screws - it's surprising how little you need in the timber to hold securely and there's much less chance of running into the screws with a gouge :;

DAMHIKT :doh:

joe greiner
16th Aug 2012, 04:57 AM
+1 for #10 sheet metal screws. Predrill a pilot hole the same size as the root. Also, countersink the wood, so that mushrooming occurs in the countersink, not at the surface, for better contact.

Cheers,
Joe