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smiife
11th Feb 2014, 07:49 PM
Hi guys,
My old chinese bowl gouge has had it, s last sharpen
So it, s time to buy a new one,,,,, but which one is best
value and hardwaring,, what is best size? Make etc?
I would like to get aussie made, are there any?
I have had a look on CWS, where there are a few
options, but would like to know what others think
differerant steel, which size?
Cheers smiife:2tsup:

Tangoman
11th Feb 2014, 07:58 PM
Mate,

I have the bowl gouge set in the below link, its great value and very good quality - highly recommended !!!

http://www.garypye.com/Turning-Tools/GPW-Turning-Tools/Sets/GPW-Master-Tool-System-p726.html

Regards,
Cam

Tim the Timber Turner
11th Feb 2014, 08:03 PM
If you ask 12 turners this question you will probably get 10 different answers.

For me the Woodcut 12mm for shaping or a 10mm Jerry Glaser for final cuts.

The best bowl gouge is the one you have in your hand and are using.

Cheers

Tim:)

Jim Carroll
11th Feb 2014, 08:19 PM
P&N are Aussie

Woodcut are New Zealand

Robert Sorby are UK

Record are UK

Henry Taylor are UK

GPW, Woodfast , etc are chinese or asian variants

artme
11th Feb 2014, 08:24 PM
I have Four: A P&N which I like very much, A Henry Taylor which is close to the P&N,

A Hamlet which is pretty good and a Robert Sorby that I don't like much.

smiife
11th Feb 2014, 08:31 PM
P&N are Aussie

Woodcut are New Zealand

Robert Sorby are UK

Record are UK

Henry Taylor are UK

GPW, Woodfast , etc are chinese or asian variants

Thanks jim,
Are vicmark aussie?
Cheers smiife:2tsup:

powderpost
11th Feb 2014, 08:41 PM
If you ask 12 turners this question you will probably get 10 different answers.

For me the Woodcut 12mm for shaping or a 10mm Jerry Glaser for final cuts.

The best bowl gouge is the one you have in your hand and are using.

Cheers

Tim:)
There is the answer to your question.
Jim

nz_carver
11th Feb 2014, 09:45 PM
Vicmarc 12mm
thompson 12mm U shape

chuck1
11th Feb 2014, 10:41 PM
I like my P&N and I have 3/8 sorby, I usually go for the P&N it's a 16 mm pretty robust and a 8 mm that I have not used much!

Paul39
12th Feb 2014, 04:11 AM
If you ask 12 turners this question you will probably get 10 different answers.

Cheers

Tim:)

Only 10, more like 15. :D:D:D

jay h
12th Feb 2014, 07:24 AM
Hi Team, Only 10 answers, don't ask about sharpening. I have Sorby, Hamlet, Woodcut, P+N and my favourite Thompson. Do I know how t use them, No. I like Thompson for the steel, finish and the price is reasonable relative to quality and you make your own custom handles. The Thompson Vee gouge is preferred over the U shape. P+N steel is good pity about the flute shape in gouges (off centre) great for Skews scrapers etc. Hamlet steel is likewise good. I purchased a double ended woodcut 9mm bowl gouge but have not used it enough to comment. I don't like Sorby, others do. The handles on most tools are too small for my liking so all my future tools will be Thompson with my own handles. Now learning to use them another story. Jay

Skew ChiDAMN!!
12th Feb 2014, 10:26 AM
P+N steel is good pity about the flute shape in gouges (off centre) great for Skews scrapers etc. Hamlet steel is likewise good.

When considering value for money, P&N (unhandled) are up there.

The trick is to not buy on-line, but to go into the store and look over the tools yourself, paying particular attention to the flutes. Off-centre? Back on the shelf. Nasty ridges & scores the length of the flute? Back on the shelf.

Once you have a good one, then the first thing to do once it follows you home is to use a small, rounded slip-stone (or s/paper wrapped around a wooden form or...) and hone the inside of the flute until that sucker shines. Remember, it's the flute that is the cutting edge and if it's 'ragged' then the cutting edge will be too!

It sounds like a lot of work... and is... but the end result is worth it. They're made from damned good steel and the only real difference in use between my 8mm P&N gouge & my 8mm Thompson Kryo is time between sharpens. The Kryo lasts quite a bit longer, but cost a helluva lot more. So I only use it for finishing cuts now... the P&N is my main goto. ;)

Paul39
12th Feb 2014, 01:14 PM
Wot Skew said about tuning above. I have Crown, Thompson, Henry Taylor, Chinese from Penn State Industries, unknown HSS reputedly from Sheffield. Three are 5/8 in, two 1/2, and one 3/8.

When sharpened on a 120 grit dry grinder using a fixed jig to a mild fingernail grind, they all cut about the same for about the same length of time.

I do have the habit of when a tool is not easily making shavings to give it a quick swipe on the grinder.

I think there is more difference in how the tool is sharpened and how it is handled than in the brand name.

I have several OLD, OLD, carbon steel tools that cut better than the HSS for a shorter time. I use those, freshly sharpened and honed for the final cuts before sanding.

My most recent is a Buck Brothers cast steel spindle gouge. Rolled up on its side it puts a finish on the inside or outside of a bowl as nice as a skew puts on a spindle.

ian thorn
12th Feb 2014, 05:32 PM
My go to is a woodcut I buy the tip 12mm, and fit it on a bright steel shaft then it fits in the woodcut handle or crown revelution .

smiife
12th Feb 2014, 07:14 PM
Hi guys,
WOW, ask 13 turners and get 13 differing replies
Thanks to all that have taken time to offer an opinion
very much appreciated,
Lots of info to take in and compare the pros and cons
Cheers smiife:2tsup:

Tim the Timber Turner
12th Feb 2014, 08:43 PM
[QUOTE=Paul39;1746724.

I think there is more difference in how the tool is sharpened and how it is handled than in the brand name
[/QUOTE]

As much as it pains me to do so Paul.:(

I have agree with that.:2tsup:

Nothing personal, just prefer to have a good debate

A couple of observations regarding the different sizes.

If you have the horsepower to drive the wood, a 20 mm bowl gouge will remove large quantities of material quickly.
You can also reach further over the tool rest without the tool flexing.
A longer heavier handle helps here.

A 10mm gouge will remove smaller quantities of material and in most cases will leave a cleaner cut.
It will also flex and bounce more than a larger diameter tool when used with the same amount of overhang from the tool rest.

Most experienced bowl turners could take any brand of bowl gouge sharpen it, and make it perform well.

Having said that most of us have a favourite tool for different cuts.

My go-to bowl gouge for difficult timbers is always my 13mm Glaser gouge (mild fingernail grind) on the inside.
This tool just seems to make an unsupported entry into the timber better than any other tool I own.

On the outside shape, a 10mm version of the same (square across grind, like a roughing gouge) is my tool of choice.

Bottom line is I need to remove unwanted timber quickly and make my finish cuts as clean as possible.

As long as the shape is good I'm not worried about any small ridges off the tool.
When sanding, these little ridges will soon disappear.

However I always try to remove any torn grain as this takes heaps of sanding to remove.

Never met a turner that likes spending more time sanding than turning.:no:

My 2 bobs worth.

Cheers

Tim:)

brendan stemp
12th Feb 2014, 11:04 PM
.

However I always try to remove any torn grain as this takes heaps of sanding to remove.

Never met a turner that likes spending more time sanding than turning.:no:

My 2 bobs worth.

Cheers

Tim:)

This is when I get the 40 grit out:D ...and Tim knows I'm not kidding 'cause he supplied me with it:D

Paul39
13th Feb 2014, 03:45 AM
This is when I get the 40 grit out:D ...and Tim knows I'm not kidding 'cause he supplied me with it:D

In some cases NOTHING works as well as a 40 or 60 grit gouge.

Tim the Timber Turner
13th Feb 2014, 10:05 AM
This is when I get the 40 grit out:D ...and Tim knows I'm not kidding 'cause he supplied me with it:D

Brendan, I'm thinking of expanding the range to include 16 & 24 grit.

Not for my own use of course. :no:

I figure if you have a need for 40 grit to yourself, there must be others that need something a bit stronger:?

Do you think this is a good business move:?

Cheers

Tim:)

brendan stemp
13th Feb 2014, 12:01 PM
Brendan, I'm thinking of expanding the range to include 16 & 24 grit.

Not for my own use of course. :no:

I figure if you have a need for 40 grit to yourself, there must be others that need something a bit stronger:?

Do you think this is a good business move:?

Cheers

Tim:)

First, I need to work out whether this is a serious question. Given it is, I think there wouldn't be many that would need such coarse/strong sandpaper. I needed it for some resin with yellow box work, in a hollow form, that was extremely hard on tools and difficult to work with. So, no would be my answer.

Kidbee
13th Feb 2014, 07:37 PM
When considering value for money, P&N (unhandled) are up there.

The trick is to not buy on-line, but to go into the store and look over the tools yourself, paying particular attention to the flutes. Off-centre? Back on the shelf. Nasty ridges & scores the length of the flute? Back on the shelf.

Once you have a good one, then the first thing to do once it follows you home is to use a small, rounded slip-stone (or s/paper wrapped around a wooden form or...) and hone the inside of the flute until that sucker shines. Remember, it's the flute that is the cutting edge and if it's 'ragged' then the cutting edge will be too!

It sounds like a lot of work... and is... but the end result is worth it. They're made from damned good steel and the only real difference in use between my 8mm P&N gouge & my 8mm Thompson Kryo is time between sharpens. The Kryo lasts quite a bit longer, but cost a helluva lot more. So I only use it for finishing cuts now... the P&N is my main goto. ;)

I had my first lessons from a well known Queensland woodturner who turned a lot of hard western Queensland timbers. He always went straight from the grinder to the lathe and did not mess around with any other "fuddy duddy" sharpening. So I have followed his actions and have done the same although my skews get a touch up with a stone.

Have I been missing out on something by not taking the intermediate step of sharpening again once off the grinder???

Tim the Timber Turner
13th Feb 2014, 09:14 PM
Have I been missing out on something by not taking the intermediate step of sharpening again once off the grinder???

G'day Kidbee

Here is a simple answer.

Depends if you want to turn wood or play with your tools.

Of course in real life things are never that simple.

Straight off the grinder and back to the lathe, suits many turners (myself included), while others get enjoyment from the process of polishing and honing the cutting edge. Or as you eluded to, "fuddy duddy" sharpening.

Some will debate/discuss forever, the merits of their preferred sharpening system.

Others just want to turn wood and make things.

A production turner who lives near me only uses a slipstone to sharpen his tools.
Can you imagine how many rubs it takes to wear out a tool without it ever touching a grinder.

I met a farmer in northern Victoria who produced acceptable work with a farm built lathe and tools made from old gudgeon pins welded onto a piece of pipe. These were sharpened on the grinding disc in the shearing shed. No flash tool for him.

At the other extreme I used to give turning lessons to a retired builder who had massive workshop full of all the best machines, tools and timbers. His collection of wood planes alone would have been worth thousands.
I don't think he ever produced any work other than to make fancy display cabinets for his plane collection.

Most of us fit somewhere between these two extremes'.

There are no right or wrongs, just our own preferences.
Of course safety should always be paramount.

That's all folks

Cheers

Tim:)

Skew ChiDAMN!!
14th Feb 2014, 09:30 AM
He always went straight from the grinder to the lathe and did not mess around with any other "fuddy duddy" sharpening. So I have followed his actions and have done the same although my skews get a touch up with a stone.

Have I been missing out on something by not taking the intermediate step of sharpening again once off the grinder???

I think you misunderstand me. The polishing of the flute is done once, before the tool is ever used. From then on it's sharpened and used as per usual... and I'm another "from the grinder to the lathe" type turner.


P&N's often have ridges or grooves down the length of the flute and when you sharpen the tool, it's the intersection of the flute & bevel that's the cutting edge, right? So if the flute has a groove, then when sharpened the cutting edge will have a 'nick' where that groove meets the bevel. Or a small 'bump' if the flute has a ridge.

Thus polishing the flute once to remove these gives you a good profile for the cutting edge for the life of the rest of the tool. :)

This applies to any gouge, of course, not just P&Ns. But P&N gouges are very prone to this [manufacturing] fault, which is probably why they are so cheap considering the quality of the steel. It really doesn't take that long to clean 'em up and I don't mind a bit of work if it saves me significant coin. (An equivalent Thompson costs over twice as much but doesn't give twice the performance!)

Colin62
14th Feb 2014, 09:41 PM
Polishing the flute on a gouge is the equivalent of flattening the back of a cabinet making chisel or a plane blade

Kidbee
15th Feb 2014, 07:49 AM
I think you misunderstand me. The polishing of the flute is done once, before the tool is ever used. From then on it's sharpened and used as per usual... and I'm another "from the grinder to the lathe" type turner.


P&N's often have ridges or grooves down the length of the flute and when you sharpen the tool, it's the intersection of the flute & bevel that's the cutting edge, right? So if the flute has a groove, then when sharpened the cutting edge will have a 'nick' where that groove meets the bevel. Or a small 'bump' if the flute has a ridge.

Thus polishing the flute once to remove these gives you a good profile for the cutting edge for the life of the rest of the tool. :)

This applies to any gouge, of course, not just P&Ns. But P&N gouges are very prone to this [manufacturing] fault, which is probably why they are so cheap considering the quality of the steel. It really doesn't take that long to clean 'em up and I don't mind a bit of work if it saves me significant coin. (An equivalent Thompson costs over twice as much but doesn't give twice the performance!)

Yes, I did misunderstand you. I use P & N and have a new unused one, so will follow your advice and polish the flute and check out if it has any grooves.

Mobyturns
15th Feb 2014, 08:23 AM
Have I been missing out on something by not taking the intermediate step of sharpening again once off the grinder???

Yes!!!! :D

That depends of course upon what you turn, wether you want to turn or sand! & on practicality - time vs money - if you happen to be a production/volume turner.

Fortunately I had the benefit of meeting and learning from many turners, from the roughest straight from the wheel types to one of the fuddy duddiest sharpening guru's in the wood turning world, and plenty of very good turners in between.

Simple one off tasks like honing flutes on bowl gouges, and more routine tasks like a light hone after the grinding wheel, well rewards the effort & time spent honing with a far better cut which often equates to missing one or even two, and perhaps all, steps/grades in sanding. Now if you choose to turn mongrel wood full of nasties like embeded sand, nails, wire etc or some of our Aussie well dried concrete like timbers, why bother to even touch the tool after the grinder? Keep the grinder spinning, don't even bother to turn the grinder off.

Despite popular thought the burr does not do the cutting on gouges & skews - the edge does. Different story for scrapers though.

Now take a quantum leap with honing tools for delicate turnings - no tool straight from a conventional 80g ALOX grinder will turn delicate or a 1mm thin finial with any real success. Hone suitable tools to a keeness similar to a razor and you will never touch that finial with sandpaper. Sanding on these items destroys the detail & often the item itself. Honed tools are a must.


To the original question – which gouge? Only one??

The gouge quality is linked to the above – if you are a “straight from the grinder” or a “no hone” turner then the benefits from the higher quality steels may not be all that much of a benefit to you. If you hone then the ASP2030, V10 etc steels will certainly benefit but may not be as radical as the blurb suggests. Quality manufactured M2 HSS is all that most turners will ever require. It holds a good edge for a satisfactory length of turning time and is not brittle. The harder the steel generally means it is relatively brittle when compared to M2 HSS – nasties usually take out good chunks of steel. Price was a sticking point but now the “newer” steels are becoming far more competitive.

I’ve been using Hamlet ASP2030 (spindle & skews) & Thompson (bowl, spindle & skews) plus P&N and a range of M2 HSS Sorby, Hamlet, Crown, Henry Taylor tools. Which is better? The tool you have got! Learn to sharpen it well and practice. I have preferences for certain tools in certain applications and they all don’t come from the same stable or even the same steel type.

Now a preference for “U”, “Vee”, Supa, Parabolic, Master flute shapes and “bottom feeder”, “Ellsworth”, “Irish” grinds – best of luck sorting that one out. Each has a benefit in a particular application and has often been proven through much trial and effort. Work out what you prefer to turn and see what the “successful” turners making similar items use. Chances are each will have a different preference. If you get a chance to try another turners tools / grinds have a go, never know they may actually be onto something, then again they may not.

chuck1
16th Feb 2014, 09:25 AM
two advantages of honing I like are the Sharp tool needs less force to perform a cut or roll a bead, and in a production environment honing a tool dare I say gives you a break away from the lathe which is beneficial for the mind! turning 4 to 7 balusters an hour takes alot of concentration and even though I'm leaning against a bench honing I'm having a "break" . don't get me wrong I enjoy turning!

NeilS
16th Feb 2014, 06:49 PM
My go-to bowl gouge for difficult timbers is always my 13mm Glaser gouge (mild fingernail grind) on the inside.



Tim - is that an original Glaser or a Glaser Hitec (http://www.glaserhitec.com/shop/glaser-oval-bowl-gouges/)?

If one of the newer Hitecs, then I already have your opinion on that.

If an original, have you also had a chance to use one of the newer Hitecs and how do they compare?

The old 'Glasers' must be getting a bit rare now. I'd be sleeping with it under my pillow!

Pat
16th Feb 2014, 08:02 PM
Neil, I know of 1 other 1/2" Glaser Bowl Gouge in the wild and seen it at work. My 1/4" version is safely tucked away.:;

Chief Tiff
16th Feb 2014, 08:23 PM
I'll have to try Skew's tip with the polished flutes. Mine aren't too bad as I always hone both the flute and the edge but I might spend some dedicated time to doing it properly. Actually; I need to dedicate some time to actually doing some turning as it's been a few months since I span anything in anger...

I have my little lathe set up on a rolling table with the grinder on the opposite corner for easy sharpening. I do most of my turning straight off the grinder but when I do finish turning I have a 19mm thick MDF disc mounted on a faceplate that I use for honing. Give it a lick with polishing soap and it puts a beaut edge on anything; I hone all my knives on this wheel as well. On the face of the disc I glued some of that non-slip mesh stuff; I use it for finishing off the bottoms of bowls by jamming them between the disc and the tailstock; the friction holds the whole lot together tight enough to remove the chuck spigot off the bottom.

Next project is to have a disc I can mount behind behind the chuck...

smiife
18th Feb 2014, 08:06 PM
Thanks guys for your input, still not too
sure which way to go, but a lot of information
to take in, maybe too many choices at the end of the day:o
cheers smiife:2tsup:

NeilS
19th Feb 2014, 07:10 PM
P&N are Aussie



Partially, according to Bruce Bell... "The raw material is imported from Austria, as the quality standard of the material is excellent & high speed steels are not manufactured in Australia in the required grade & size".

So, the steel is Austrian, and the machining and the all important tempering is Australian.




There are no right or wrongs, just our own preferences.
Of course safety should always be paramount.



+1

You won't go badly wrong with any of the above suggested recommendations.

I have and use many of them and am not dissatisfied with any of them.

Yes, I have my favourites, but they may not do the same for you.

Whatever you choose, you are likely to be satisfied.

brendan stemp
19th Feb 2014, 07:41 PM
There's been no mention of the Vicmarc bowl gouges (apologies if there has). Has anyone used them?? They are using a very hard wearing steel so I would be interested to hear of anyone's thoughts on them.

nz_carver
19th Feb 2014, 08:40 PM
There's been no mention of the Vicmarc bowl gouges (apologies if there has). Has anyone used them?? They are using a very hard wearing steel so I would be interested to hear of anyone's thoughts on them.
Been using vicmarc for almost 2 yrs now they have out lasted other brands
I did try and try my best to kill one well I was up in Brisbane with know luck so I got a set of them:U
they hold a edge a lot better then most, once you get past the first 5mm or so
I myself like the handles but there not for everyone.

I use true grind and have found there are other brands that are hard to sharpen rite with the jig
I found this it not a problem with the vicmarcs.
I also like that you can take the gouge out of the Handel when you sharpen.

I use the vicmarc sharpening set up well in Brisbane and will be bringing one back with me next trip as was over wait last time:doh:

Tim the Timber Turner
19th Feb 2014, 10:59 PM
[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]
So, the steel is Austrian, and the machining and the all important tempering is Australian.


About 15 years ago I was lucky enough to visit the P&N factory in country Victoria where Bruce Bell and I were given a factory tour.

One thing that I remember was the tools were tempered by plunging in liquid salt.

No samples unfortunately.

Cheers

Tim.:)

NeilS
20th Feb 2014, 02:10 PM
There's been no mention of the Vicmarc bowl gouges (apologies if there has). Has anyone used them?? They are using a very hard wearing steel so I would be interested to hear of anyone's thoughts on them.

Brendan - Vicmarc uses the same powdered metal steel (V10 or A11, probably from Crucible Materials Corporation) as Doug Thompson. A very nice steel for woodturners, sharpens readily to a keen edge and is tenacious... holding its edge longer than M2.

V15 has even more vanadium content, therefore a bit more expensive, and that bit more tenacious, but in my experience doesn't take as keen an edge due to the larger particle size. A good steel for roughing out, it cuts on and on, in a fashion.

As yet I haven't gone with the Vicmarc offering as it is not clear from any of the sites offering the Vicmarc gouge for sale which 'parabolic' flute profile they have adopted; it could be any one of these profiles (https://www.google.com.au/search?q=parabolic+shape&client=firefox-a&hs=iqK&rls=org.mozilla:en-GB:official&channel=sb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=hWUFU6mWHoX5rQfcz4G4Bw&ved=0CEsQsAQ&biw=1525&bih=691&dpr=0.9). Some parabolic profiles are on the 'V' end of the spectrum while others are closer to the 'U'.

In case anyone is interested, there was an old thread on the Flute Profiles (http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=147465) of the various gouges that I started some time back.

NZ_Carver, any chance of a picy of your Vicmarc flute looking from the end?

So, Brendan, I can't comment on the performance of the Vicmarc gouges, but their steel composition sits close to the cost/performance sweet spot.

Tim the Timber Turner
20th Feb 2014, 02:31 PM
I ordered a 3/8 Bowl Gouge and a short quick release handle.

Love the shape and feel of the plastic handle.

Hate the length of the short?? handle nearly 400mm long with the reduction bush.

Love the way the gouge cuts, equally as good as my 3/8 original Glasser.

Hate The fact that I have to purchase a $15 reduction bush for each tool I want to use in the handle, or undo the grub screws with an Allen Key. This of course nullifies the idea of quick release and you may as well buy a standard handle.

I currently use this 3/8 Vicmarc gouge in a Woodcut QR handle which uses ISO Metric collets. This is a much better design as you can vary the tool length extension and store the tool reversed in the handle for transport.

Sorry Vicmarc, this QR handle misses the mark.

That's been my experience

Cheers

Tim

Christos
20th Feb 2014, 06:36 PM
The worst thing is there are too many choices. I am not going to tell you which one I have as I only continue to use two brands.

I will say this pick one size in the middle and see how you go. I can almost guarantee that you will be able to decide much better once you start using it. I was fortunate to visit one of the members and he allowed me to try his lathe and tools.

A club can do the same thing.

nz_carver
20th Feb 2014, 07:04 PM
Tim have you treys the blue Handles with the grub screws?

Tim the Timber Turner
20th Feb 2014, 07:56 PM
No! I have the quick release cam lock handle.

Great locking action by twisting the collar a few degrees in either direction.

Better action than my expensive camera tripod.

But!!!

I don't like having to buy a $15 reducing bush for each tool.

This is a deal breaker for me and I probably won't buy any more tools for this handle.

I also dislike the fact that the shaft of the tool is machined to a smaller diameter where it fits into the bush.

This means you can't adjust the length or reverse the tool in the handle.

I like to use a short bowl gouge for box making, not possible with this tool due to the reduced shank.

This handle was the short version but at 400mm it's too long to pass in front of you when standing at the lathe.

I must see if I can shorten it.

I think this tool was designed by an engineer, not a wood turner.

Finding plenty to complain about the handle let me finish by saying I love how the 10mm tool cuts.

It has an interesting flute, sort of like a V with a round bottom. The flute is fairly shallow at 5mm this leaves plenty of meat under the flute and this will help overcome the flexing which is common of smaller diameter tools.

Hey Neil!! you are welcome to call and try it out.

You know the deal!

Just knock on the workshop door with your elbow:2tsup:

Cheers

Tim:):)

RETIRED
20th Feb 2014, 08:24 PM
Just knock on the workshop door with your elbowAre your hands that contaminated?:kickcan:

Tim the Timber Turner
20th Feb 2014, 08:32 PM
Are your hands that contaminated?:kickcan:

No! No! you got it wrong.:no:

Neil has a great wine cellar.:U

I'm hoping his arms will be full:2tsup:

Cheers :)

Pat
20th Feb 2014, 08:42 PM
Tim, the Woodcut Collet Handle is 400mm (16"), but allows me the freedom to have as much of the shaft inserted in the handle . . .

Tim the Timber Turner
20th Feb 2014, 08:49 PM
Tim, the Woodcut Collet Handle is 400mm (16"), but allows me the freedom to have as much of the shaft inserted in the handle . . .

Pat please read post 37.

Cheers

Tim:)

NeilS
20th Feb 2014, 08:50 PM
Hey Neil!! you are welcome to call and try it out.

You know the deal!

Just knock on the workshop door with your elbow:2tsup:



:U.... coz I have a bottle of red in each hand.

Tim the Timber Turner
20th Feb 2014, 09:00 PM
:U.... coz I have a bottle of red in each hand.

One each!! well done Neil!!!:2tsup:

Cheers
Tim:)

NeilS
20th Feb 2014, 09:14 PM
:U.... coz I have a bottle of red in each hand.




I'm hoping his arms will be full:2tsup:



Correction... the contra seems to have gone up, an armful is now the going rate... :;

smiife
27th Feb 2014, 08:20 PM
Hi guys,
Just placed an order for the vicmarc bowl gouge
Already made the handle , will let you all know
how it goes:U
Thanks again to everone who has had input
in this thread
C Heers smiife:2tsup: