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TKO
7th Dec 2014, 10:13 PM
What about a Car restoration forum, a work in progress, up to finished restoration.

KBs PensNmore
7th Dec 2014, 11:28 PM
What about a Car restoration forum, a work in progress, up to finished restoration.

Great idea, could also have a sub forum "Parts, looking for or for sale"? What do you think? Could building a hotrod, be classed as a restoration?
Kryn

TKO
8th Dec 2014, 09:46 PM
Hi Kryn,

I don't think it matters what car you are working on, building or restoring, so long as one can see progress and how to get over any problems, which often arises, if you are a beginner, or a
well conversed restorer, I have restored two cars in the past but long before I had a computer
so restoration of them is not available although I have a photo, I am now restoring a small Austin 1953 A30 AS3, which I have kept a record of just about all the work that I have done on it so far,If there is Interest I will put up

Eddie

KBs PensNmore
9th Dec 2014, 12:46 AM
Hi Eddie, back in 1988, I built a Suzuki 4WD tray top up from a scrap. It started life as a 1 litre with a factory tray. I rebuilt it with an updated brake booster, a 1.3 motor reconditioned and fitted with GTI pistons, 5 speed gearbox, 1 litre transfer case and diffs fitted with 9.00 X 15 Hankook rubber, upgraded suspension of my own doing, 6 leaves in the rear. Under the bonnet it had a dual battery tray that incorporated a tool box that carried the spare parts, also had an air conditioner compressor for pumping tyres and running air tools. Body wise, cab was extended 150 mm behind the driver, interior was pretty much standard except for SAAS racing seats, a modified dash that had a pocket for bits and pieces, hand made overhead console, which held the CB and UHF radios plus a HF radio mounted behind the drivers seat, outside was a snorkel, a 40 litre water tank was fitted between cab and tray, under the tray was a 120 litre fuel tank that held a 20 litre reserve compartment. Basically it was like an upside down U with the tail shaft running in between the U. The tray was built with a canopy that had 3 liftup doors that held the "motel" as well as about 50 Kg of recovery gear, winch highlift jack etc. Up front was a bullbar of my own design, that later held a power winch, that could be used backwards, if required. All the manufactured items were built by myself, as I couldn't buy much Suzuki items back then, I ended up with a business making items for Suzuki's.
I kept all the receipts for everything that I had bought, I tallied up to $15,000:oo:. With still a pile of receipts left to count, I threw the rest out.:C
Regards
Kryn

TKO
9th Dec 2014, 02:51 PM
Hi Kryn,
I cannot for the life of me , get a photo into the post this is the second time today trying to answer your post I can not upload photo to this post, I have followed the instructing in the FAQ ,and they don't make sense to me, it says to upload a attachment ,you need to press the new post button or new thread ,not quick reply, well I know I wear glasses but there is no new post button any where I can see when I want to upload the photo, so messing about with the attempt to upload I loose what I have started to write and have to start again.
I liked the Suzuki build, you had put a lot of effort in, and not being the largest of cars you certainly put a lot of extra attachments on ,which makes it tall worth while if you have use for them, and as you say it led to better things, being able to make money making the Suzuki gear as a business.
I do not know why I can't upload as I only a short while back up loaded pics
in the forum has it been changed recently, or is it old age creeping in ?
have just had a thought am I still on IE as I notice I can not get back to your post it wont back up I will post this and check it out.

Well there you are I was just going to send I thought I would give it one more try, I wont risk another of the 1932 Austin 12/4, but this was built from a basket case, I renewed all the wood work and most of the panels done the upholstery and the top and then my son took it over and I started on a 1923 Dodge Tourer, I will try and dig up a photo of it, and then I will start on my WIP

Eddie

http://www.woodworkforums.com/images/attach/jpg.gif austin 12.jpg (91.6 KB)

this was taken in the ninety's

KBs PensNmore
10th Dec 2014, 12:52 AM
Nice looking restoration. You're better than I am, I still can't work out how to load pics at all!!!
I've a chance to pick up a Willys 2 door roadster soft top body, well what's left of it, the wood is almost non-existent, and the metal floor is not much better.
How do you pull the metalwork off the timber without damaging it. The metal panel, appears to be folded over the metal underneath that is nailed onto the timber :?.
Kryn

TKO
10th Dec 2014, 01:34 PM
Well I was lucky with both the cars that I restored there was little timber left to remove ,but you might find that where the meta is nailed to the timber it might be that the heads have been leaded over ,so you will have to prize it off as best you can as I haven't a clue as to how the willies are connected to the timber if you get, it go gently.I was lucky getting that photo in,I think what I was doing was not checking the attachment in the preview page and was under the impression it had not uploaded ,I seem to have a problem with this as well.What I do is go to reply and write my message and then try to load a attachment, I usually finish up losing the written piece ,because I cant upload the attachment an have to write again which is never the same .I will try to upload again and see what happens.

KBs PensNmore
10th Dec 2014, 06:36 PM
Thanks for that, will try to find any sign of leading next time I'm there. The 30 is that what it was like when you got it, or as it is now?
Are there any books available on how to do the old type panel work, or is it one of those things, learn as you go, or learn by your mistakes?:rolleyes:
Kryn

TKO
10th Dec 2014, 09:03 PM
That is what it was like when I got it, there was 2 other A30 cars, one is behind my shed and the other is at my sons tyre factory with two others so I have 5 altogether,Don't think that I will get them all finished.the one behind the shed is complete and was going till it was parked where I picked them up, and had been there about 7 years I think,will be my next one I hope
This is the other two and the furthest one is the complete one and the one I am working on is just behind them, my son is having a look at them before I bought them.

well I have managed to put a pic in again, I think I have found my problem, the pics are going in each time but only show up in the preview, all I did was, reply to post, write my post,
press attachment. when the upload manager comes on screen, press add files, then brouse, choose your pic and press open at the bottom, it then comes into the upload manager, I wait a second or two it drops down to the lower box ,if it don't drag it down, then press in line, then done, and when I looked in preview it was there, that
is what I am doing right or wrong, the pics are going in,I hope this helps,
I am sorting out some pics of the WIP.

Eddie

TKO
10th Dec 2014, 09:39 PM
This some of the rusted out areas that had to be cut out and repaired ,then new floors were made and welded in and all the boot floor and the petrol tank floor was renewed, the car was completely stript of every thing, and then turned on its side on to truck inner tubes, then the work really began Plenty of pics to follow, just got to sort them out hope you try an upload some pics Kryn .

Eddie
,

KBs PensNmore
10th Dec 2014, 11:30 PM
Gee's the rust ants certainly have been busy on the floor section. How do you do the ribbing strengthening on the floor panels, or don't you bother with the ribs? Would an English Jenny be of help to do this?
In '98 I did some work on my sons LH Torana, took out the battery tray as it was rusted, and the section on the other side as well, so it looked the same, the battery went into the boot. The firewall where the fan/heater sits, was removed and filled with straight sheet metal, no ribs, and metal finished, no bog whatsoever. The rear was touched as well, by tubbing the wheel arches, they only went out as far as the chassis on the back, that way no engineers report was required. His mates said it was impossible to get the size tyres under that he did, they couldn't work it out, as it looked standard.
That vehicle runs a EFI V8 out of a Commodore, instead of the original 4. Over the years I've done a bit of resto work on other peoples cars, 2 Y sections on an FJ, cut out the rust, folded new sections and welded in while it was on the car. It had to go for an inspection, and passed with flying colors, also have done sill panels inner and outer, this was put in the folder and set 2-3 mm apart and creased enough to get the radius. 1.6 metal was used for this, then sanded smooth, couldn't tell OE from replacement. Worst part was welding upside down and overhead on thin stuff.
One handy item I picked up some time ago, was an air operated tool that puts a step in the sheet metal to allow another panel to lay flush with the surface.
Regards
Kryn

TKO
11th Dec 2014, 04:10 PM
So you have had plenty of experience restoring the finer parts of a car which is handy with the more modern types, they have a lot of different methods of making cars, I was alright till they bought in the engine computers ,I have no idea what is in the engine compartment today,so if you get back to doing the Willies Jeep it will be different to working on modern metal ,I have heard of the joggler I think it is called ,haven't got one, would come in handy no doubt, at the moment I am not able to do much of any thing such as on the restoration had a mild heart attack 4 weeks ago,and just doing a bit here and there but coming good, back to driving tomorrow, done a bit more on the upholstery so another week or two I should be back to normal, feeling pretty good at the moment, so its nice to have the computer to play with.

Have you made an effort to post ,just give it a go, I am no wizard on the computer, I have only been doing it for about eight years and I still have trouble with it, self taught no idea really, and started it to late in life, Put a couple more pics on the repairing of panels,better stop or I will loose the lot , I notice I have put them in the wrong order as it is.

Eddie

KBs PensNmore
11th Dec 2014, 11:21 PM
So you have had plenty of experience restoring the finer parts of a car which is handy with the more modern types, they have a lot of different methods of making cars, I was alright till they bought in the engine computers ,I have no idea what is in the engine compartment today,so if you get back to doing the Willies Jeep it will be different to working on modern metal ,I have heard of the joggler I think it is called ,haven't got one, would come in handy no doubt, at the moment I am not able to do much of any thing such as on the restoration had a mild heart attack 4 weeks ago,and just doing a bit here and there but coming good, back to driving tomorrow, done a bit more on the upholstery so another week or two I should be back to normal, feeling pretty good at the moment, so its nice to have the computer to play with.

Have you made an effort to post ,just give it a go, I am no wizard on the computer, I have only been doing it for about eight years and I still have trouble with it, self taught no idea really, and started it to late in life, Put a couple more pics on the repairing of panels,better stop or I will loose the lot , I notice I have put them in the wrong order as it is.

Eddie

Hi Eddie, under the bonnet of the modern car is a nightmare, that's why modern mechanics are called "Parts Replacement Technicians", the computer tells them what to replace, similar to panel beaters are "Panel Replacement Technicians". I have a friend who is a mechanic, from the old school, made his own bearings, scrape, etc. even he takes his new car to a technician!!!! He doesn't even bother doing oil changes any more.
The Willy's not a Jeep but a sedan roadster soft top, which is why most of the floor is rusted out. By the way nice work on the floor panels. How did you get the reinforcing section in them?? What thickness zinc did you use?
Hope you get get better soon, it's a bugger being laid up. I spent 21 days in hospital back in 2000, broke both legs in a MVA, they were going to take my right leg off, as it was badly smashed, 7-8 pieces just below the knee. I have a steel plate that goes from the knee to the ankle with 21 screws in it, had 380 stitches on the right side of the leg alone, looks like a shark bit it. Left leg looks similar, I tell people it was a crocodile attack in the Murray River:D
I've not tried to post anything yet, as I don't have a digital camera, maybe Santa will bring me one. I'm pretty computer illiterate myself, but I can do CAD work, as I went to night school for that for my business, Autocad 2000 and Autocad Inventor, is what I use.
I wonder how long before we get kicked off from here, it would be nice to hear from others who have done similar. I know there is someone in WA that restored a motor bike that was in Model Engineers Workshop, can't remember his name, they have some bits of restoration work
from time to time as well as some tooling to make. Will have to make a separate file for them.
Regards
Kryn

TKO
12th Dec 2014, 01:17 PM
Hi Kryn, sorry about the jeep I should of known better I have a good library of older vehicles, and I now know what you might be letting your self into, would be a good restoration would not be to many of them about, I used the metal as near as possible for what they sell today as that on the car, the actual boot area I made with much thicker metal as the lower floor had reinforcing in the bend in the metal and my little gadget was not able to do it ,but up to 1.2 mm I could put in the floor reinforcing ,if you have not the machine to do this ,there is other ways to do it, make a metal former and hammer the metal to shape, as to the wood work ,if you have not many patterns to work from it then becomes a bit of a problem you will have to work from the metal areas, if you have the wood work tools necessary to do the required type of joints and rebates that might be required you will be alright and it is very interesting work to do, although my car is just about ready for the final coats of paint, I have many photos I have taken of how I got through all the problems of repairs and removing the rust from the metal parts , I know there is only us two at he moment ,and if they want to kick us off good luck to them, they are asking for interested forums, we are doing our best ,any way it can be a talk show as well. When I removed all the running gear I dismantled it all and put most of it through a big tub, of molasses,including back axle, springs, drive shaft complete ,which allowed me to dismantle the joints that were rusted solid, then repair, prime and paint, I also use electrolysis, on some parts.Do you know what year model the willies is, I can look it up and see what you have, would be interesting, I thin I wil have to get on to the moderator as there is som roblem with the printing of the post I will leave these few so that you can see wha I mean, it does not do it on any where else nd t's a pain t hav to continually correct it and the page flutters up and dwn lwhen you try t o back to last pst Its a PITA.Edde

TKO
12th Dec 2014, 02:22 PM
This is the hoto that I could not put in the last post,
,as I said being primed and painted,I am hoping to get some thing done with the missing letters as I scroll down it just flutters up and down will not let me see the last post or the
attachment area.

Eddie

Simplicity
12th Dec 2014, 03:06 PM
Interesting chat you two are having.
I've been watching in the back ground.
If you get stuck with any off the panel beating panel questions sing out and I will try to help.
I was panel beater for about 15 or so years 5 of them cutting out rust on VWs in England
So there you go your not alone lol

KBs PensNmore
12th Dec 2014, 04:22 PM
Looks like you use the same spray booth that I use Eddie. The parts after the Molls asses treatment look real good, does it take off the paint as well? I knew it was used for rusty parts. I looked on fleabay for books on restoration and found some $15.00 for one but postage was $22.00 from Qld, another from USA $22.00 with free postage!! I think he was trying to rip me off. This is the second time I've written this out, went to send, out of credit. As I use prepaid, I get no nasty surprises with big bills. Wish that there was a draft feature on here to save replies, instead of having to go into word etc. Des Bromilow was the name that I was thinking of when I mentioned about the motorcycle resto in MEW magazine, he did an article on the casting of an exhaust manifold for his vintage bike. Quite interesting, it was.
Thanks for the offer of panel beating tips, Simplicity:2tsup::2tsup: Have read a few books on it, from the library, but will take you up on the offer if required.
Regards
Kryn

crowie
12th Dec 2014, 05:21 PM
I'm enjoying this thread on Restoring Old Cars.... well done gents....crowie

TKO
12th Dec 2014, 11:02 PM
Welcome Simplicity, wish I had known you a couple of years ago, But better late than never, although I have finished my welding and panel repairs there is always some thing that will need a bit of professional advise ,so its good to know you are in touch.

Kryn I have done parts of the other cars in the molasses and kept them for spares I am slowly, stripping the other cars, and stowing them away, as some of the bodies will be to far gone before they get restored , you are right about the price of books, especially if they are good ones, I have a few handy books on car upholstery and car woodwork. but its not the same as having a expert show you how it is done, I used to do the graining on the old cars metal facia an door mouldings, they would bring the pieces to me repaired and primed, and I would undercoat and grain ad clear finish them, but hat was way back in the 80s and 90s,very fiddley job need a lot of space to hang them while painting ,wil look out a pic or two.
This is my molasses tub and it is still going,but getting a bit smelly after nearly two years,
and how it can clean the rusted parts up,and the drums I skimmed out on the lathe,
and I think it is the best way to o it, but be careful putting in parts with aluminium attached as it will affect the aluminium.
Thanks peter glad you will be watching still having trouble with the missing letters.

Eddie

KBs PensNmore
13th Dec 2014, 12:26 AM
Hi Eddie, what is the name of the book on the woodwork PLEASE and do you find it good value? The molls asses that you use, is it mixed with anything or neat and where do you get it from? The parts certainly come out clean, I'll remember about the ally not to go in it.
Regards
Kryn

crowie
13th Dec 2014, 08:30 AM
Happy Birthday today Eddie.....

TKO
13th Dec 2014, 12:58 PM
Thanks Peter the day as started good. still have the letters missing.

Kryn Wooden Body Framing ,by Alan Alderwick.

This is a handy book it is work done on a Mg and Alvis,which dose not go back to far, so not in the Antique line.

These are by C,W,Terry and Authur Hall, A Vintage Croft Series
Antique Auto Body, Wood Work,
" " " Metal Work,
" " " Top Work,
Are for very old Antiques, but gives a lot of information ,on the different parts of a car. if you are rebuilding one, handy to see how they built them in those days, especially the Top folding Iron work, Not useful for modern type restoration.

This is the Graining I use to do.

Eddie

A Duke
13th Dec 2014, 03:22 PM
Hi,
That graining is impressive, I believe the wood grain on the pressed steel dashes on some mid nineteen forties American cars, (eg. Oldsmobile and Buick) were done with a photographic process and could not be repaired.
Regards

TKO
13th Dec 2014, 10:19 PM
You are right I think most cars with all metal trim were done that way and when they wear out in them most handled places, as you say they would not be repaired, so I did quite a few cars of various shapes and sizes ,still have my kit for the graining but have not done any since the early 90s.there was back in the 50s a graining paper in the USA ,that you could use on prepared ground work, and you could use it a couple of times before it became to faint an the colour would be lost, and you then coated it with the finishing coat, but it was like the panelled timber today a repeated pattern, unfortunately The trade of graining and marbling has died out, but if you have to restore a car and you need to do the grain replacement, there wont be many people around to do it any more, which is a shame, any way thanks for the nice words, must get back to the WIP .

Eddie

KBs PensNmore
13th Dec 2014, 10:51 PM
Many happy returns for today Eddie:bdaysong:, hope you had a nice one. That graining is beautiful work, is it done by a curved rubber block, I vaguely remember my father having one. Thanks for the details of the books:2tsup: I'll look them up, when/if, I get closer to doing something with the Willy's.
Kryn

Chris Parks
14th Dec 2014, 03:17 PM
Hi Eddie, under the bonnet of the modern car is a nightmare, that's why modern mechanics are called "Parts Replacement Technicians", the computer tells them what to replace

If only it that true life would be a lot more simple.

TKO
14th Dec 2014, 10:30 PM
No they are done in water and oil stains ,Using special brushes ,the rubber graining pads you are talking about are a bit on the repartition side and can look very gaudy on doors and cars ,as they tend to bring the grained line into very thick lines ,but if you have any idea how wood actually looks when it has bee quartered or slabbed, it is impossible to make it look like the rear thing with the rubber gizmo.I had cleaned all the crud of the out side of the car floor, and gave it a good coat of Haymes Rust lockpaint, then a coat of Auto primer followed by a under coat and finished with stone chip paint Sealing all joints first, this is what the bottom looked like at this stage, ready to be put back up to the right way,

KBs PensNmore
15th Dec 2014, 12:03 AM
Excellent work Eddie, looks like she'll be around for another 100 years.:2tsup: That's the beauty of being able to turn the body over, all nooks and crannies can be gotten at and repaired properly.



http://d1r5wj36adg1sk.cloudfront.net/images/attach/jpg.gif IMG_0849 making new floors.jpg (http://www.woodworkforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=333885&d=1418271863)


How do you do panels like this? Is it 2 metal plates put into a large press or is it hammered? As it looks like a large pressing.
Kryn

KBs PensNmore
16th Dec 2014, 12:30 AM
Seeing as how we don't have an official forum as yet, I hope the mods don't mind me putting this on here.

An Old Racer brought back to life. "Terror of Turin"






Just watch them crank this baby




Interesting at the end of the video when they finally start the engine!




http://vimeo.com/113158655












Kryn

Goggomobile
16th Dec 2014, 07:27 AM
Chaps

Really great forum. I've been posting over in the welding section. Car restoration makes more sense. As you guessed I'm restoring three Goggos ... I'm a real novice and already made plenty of Blues.

im keen to do a blow by blow on my Goggo's ... Like most restorations I have to cover everything thing. Welding, upolstry, transmissions, painting, electrics, ....

The people in the Goggo club are great. Best help you can get .. I want to share my experience and pick into the grey haired matter out there. I have found it hard to find somewhere on the Internet to share my stuff .. Like most I'm not much of a computer wiz and cannot seem to get blogs in my brain.

Where do. I start .. Can I start a new thread on Goggo restorations ?

Randal

KBs PensNmore
16th Dec 2014, 05:08 PM
Hi Randal
Hopefully, it won't be long before we get a proper forum, until then, I don't think it would hurt to put it up here. When the moderator gives us a site, they could then move the whole lot across, hopefully. I hope I helped with the reply in the welding section.
Kryn

TKO
19th Dec 2014, 10:44 PM
Hi Randal, that's what this is all about restoring a car would love to see your Goggomobile restoration W.I.P.Hi Kryn, the panels are done on a swaging machine, it is only a cheap one, but does the job,as there is several different wheels that allow you to do a few different types of panels,and you can buy further wheels for different tasks if you need them, I am still having trouble with, posting as the words are missing letters not all the time, but it is a pita when you have to keep going back,and put in the missing letters and this takes up considerable time and really try's my patience.it only happens on this restore cars forum, not any where else on the wood work forum , I have made a complaint but have had no answer as yet, I did decide not to post any more, but it just beats the objet of starting in the first place, it takes to long to post as it is, I'm sorry for the delay answering your Question. I had to make a few tools when I took the wheels off of the car to remove the bearings ,they were quite simple to make, and the screw thread was used to make a tool to remove and put back the coil springs, which is a lot better and quicker than using the four bolt method, I found also that it was difficult to find the castle type nuts , and the pins and spherical bushes that were on the door, and brake parts, so I had to make them a well, yes you can get them from the UK but at a price, with the heavy postage ,so I have had to make quite a lot of stuff along the way, it has taken me well over anhour to make up this post with the messing about ,it should of been about ten minutes work just ridiculous, it is a PITA.Eddie

KBs PensNmore
19th Dec 2014, 11:36 PM
Hi Eddie, nice work on the tooling and hinge assy. I've asked before about a draft button on the reply, best reply was to do it in word or notepad, fit attachments, then copy and paste into reply to thread. I know its a PITA, but what can we do. Any chance of a photo of the machine used for the floor panels? Not only for me, but for others to see the type of tooling people use for resto work.
Regards
Kryn

TKO
20th Dec 2014, 09:43 PM
Yes I will pull it out tomorrow.and send a pic.I started this restoration 2 years ago this Christmas, so looking up the photos in my computer is a pains taking job as I a not very good at keeping things together, so I will post when I can sort the pics out .

Eddie.

crowie
20th Dec 2014, 10:03 PM
Yes I will pull it out tomorrow.and send a pic.I started this restoration 2 years ago this Christmas, so looking up the photos in my computer is a pains taking job as I a not very good at keeping things together, so I will post when I can sort the pics out .

Eddie.


You need one of the grandchildren or is it great children to help pop do the computer.....:wink:......

TKO
21st Dec 2014, 10:03 PM
Hi peter yes you are right I should get them to come and sort it all out.

Sorry Kryn have not sent the pic of the swager because the shed was to hot
to be in there when I had the time to dig it out, will do though.
most of the running gear is back on the car, after finishing the underneath painting and the car was turned up the right way and put on stands.
and was able to clean the engine department and prime and undercoat
ready to put the finish coat on so that I could put the new petrol and brake lines in.

Eddie

TKO
22nd Dec 2014, 02:57 PM
Well this is what I should of called it a bead roller that is what they are called,
they have lot f different dies that do a lot of different forms and shapes, this one is only a cheaply for the DIY people but with a little practice it will do good work, I put it in the vice to take the photo but it needs to be on a stand to do a floor panel, but metal formers will do the job but a its a lot of work making he formers for a one off job,there are 4 sets of roller dies with this one, but on the Net you can buy many more types than you would use in a DIY work shop.
also the net shows you videos on there uses.

Eddie

KBs PensNmore
22nd Dec 2014, 03:09 PM
Thanks for that Eddie, that is what I thought you used for making panels. Excellent work on the floor, can't even tell where the repairs were made.
All the best for Christmas and the New Year, to you and the Family,
Regards
Kryn

TKO
23rd Dec 2014, 10:08 PM
During the dismantling of the door window channels it was obvious that they would have to be replaced or repared I thought about the cost and where to get them,so I had a go at repairing them myself,it's a fiddly job to bend up so I made a former to the correct size so that it would match up with the old, I made the small pieces that fit to the door and fixed them with rivets, hope the pics explain, it seem there is not much interest in car restoring.

Eddie

Uncle Al
24th Dec 2014, 08:01 AM
Hi guys
I find this post quite interesting, and have contributed to the 1200 or so views the thread has received.
I haven't been involved with the restoration of vehicles, but have had some experiencing in motor racing, rallying and the repairs that go hand in hand with such activities.
I well remember a neighbour restoring a Vauxhall Viva and being fascinated in the way the 'drummy' doors were tightened by spot heating sections of the flat door panel then quenching with a very wet rag to shrink the metal.
A friend has restored a Volvo 122GT and I can appreciate the time, effort and expense involved.

There is a company in Picton NSW called Speedwerx that supplies equipment to the racing and restoration industries, and make quite a bit of their gear locally. (A bit unusual for any manufacturing in Australia these days!).
Have a look at http://speedwerx.com.au/pages/product-catalogue You may find something useful in their range.
The usual disclaimer of no financial interest etc. in this company applies.

Happy restoring, Alan...

crowie
24th Dec 2014, 02:06 PM
During the dismantling of the door window channels it was obvious that they would have to be replaced or repared I thought about the cost and where to get them,so I had a go at repairing them myself,it's a fiddly job to bend up so I made a former to the correct size so that it would match up with the old, I made the small pieces that fit to the door and fixed them with rivets, hope the pics explain, it seem there is not much interest in car restoring.

Eddie

Pretty damn good for such a young bloke.....:D....very well done Eddie....

Have a beaut day tomorrow with family and friends celebrating Christmas....cheers Peter

KBs PensNmore
24th Dec 2014, 05:57 PM
Thanks for the contact to Speedwerx, Allan, as you say unusual to see gear like that made here. Definitely some nice equipment there:2tsup:
Nice work on the glass trim Eddie, the moderator on here might as us to go to the motor vehicle section, if we don't get our own.
Have you looked back through some of the post in there, there is one by zuffen, I've finished my project now what? (http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=129838) Interesting vehicle to say the least. Don't know if he is still around, as I've not seen him come up on the forum. Could be a handy person to know, going by what he has posted.
Regards
Kryn

TKO
29th Dec 2014, 03:29 PM
Thanks Peter had a good Christmas, and hope you had the same, I am nearly back to normal now have managed to take the dogs for a walk at last, I think they thought I had forgotten them.

Hi Kryn, yes I followed up on the Zuffen posting very interesting, It seems very quiet on the Weston front as the saying goes, and there does not look like much interest in restoring a car, what do you think ? is it a waste of time posting and looking at your own W.I.P.

Eddie.
,

A Duke
29th Dec 2014, 05:48 PM
Hi,
1398 Views, I would not say no one is watching, it's not some thing that wants a lot of waffel and if you are not doing a rebuild there is nothing to show, but I think quite a few of us are watching with interest.
Keep up the good work

crowie
29th Dec 2014, 07:19 PM
Thanks Peter had a good Christmas, and hope you had the same, I am nearly back to normal now have managed to take the dogs for a walk at last, I think they thought I had forgotten them.
YES Eddie, Good Christmas with Boxing Day our the Family Day....Good news to hear you are getting back to full health!!

Hi Kryn, yes I followed up on the Zuffen posting very interesting, It seems very quiet on the Weston front as the saying goes, and there does not look like much interest in restoring a car, what do you think ? is it a waste of time posting and looking at your own W.I.P.

Eddie.
,

G'Day Eddie & Kryn;
PLEASE keep the Car Restoration WIP going as I for one am enjoying seeing what you are doing, especially love the photos with the notes...
Thank you gents for the time & effort to keep the thread going..
Cheers Peter

OldGrain
29th Dec 2014, 09:07 PM
Well i`m following your resto TKO with much interest having worked in the auto industry for decades. I particularly like the idea that instead of buying certain pieces you actually repair or remake thereby saving money while at the same time getting satisfaction of reproducing.That says a lot to me & probably others watching this story unfold.So continued good luck on your journey.

TKO
29th Dec 2014, 10:58 PM
Thanks Peter, A Duke,, Kryn and OldGrain. so its on with the W.I.P, I had to strip the gear box because it was full of black oil, well more like burnt oil and of course the rust ,that creeps in from any opening, there was a lot of wear in the selectors rods ,and as I had 4 gear boxes I decided to have a look at them and see if there was any chance of replacement parts that might help the rebuild, so clear the bench and strip them down, I had a good Idea what wanted replacing and knew what it would cost to buy them, so a good bit of time was spent checking for wear and trying not to split up a unit which I was given to understand would cause a noisy gear box ,had to get new bearings, gaskets I made,that was the easy part, Here I hope is a plan of the gear box, so with out this manual I would have been up the creek, so I decided to repair the two selector rods ,they are actually called reverse and 1 and 2 fork rods and after a bit of weld and grind they seem to be ok, having a few tools that will do the job helps a lot. I have managed to get to good gear boxes out of the four with new bearings and all the little bits and pieces that had worn out like distant washers for the lay gear, can make new bushes but would have to buy in things like needle bearings, although I was lucky not needing needle bearing.
Eddie

Gra
29th Dec 2014, 11:06 PM
Well i`m following your resto TKO with much interest having worked in the auto industry for decades. I particularly like the idea that instead of buying certain pieces you actually repair or remake

for some of us that is the only choice. My local dealer went bust about 70 Years ago...

wheelinround
30th Dec 2014, 08:16 AM
I'd have preferred to see a section on "Restoring Vehicles" of any sort Motorbikes, Cars, Trucks even the odd strange vehicle of yesteryear, still your wish seems to have been granted.

TKO its coming along nicely thanks for sharing .....watching now.

TKO is it angle of photo in gear box shot or are each of the in put tail shaft covers different?

A Duke
30th Dec 2014, 10:54 AM
Looking at those pictures I can almost smell the gearbox oil.
Regards

OldGrain
30th Dec 2014, 11:30 AM
Gday Gra. - "for some of us that is the only choice. My local dealer went bust about 70 Years ago..." - when i read that my warped sense of humour envisioned you sitting on a wooden crate still waiting.

TKO
30th Dec 2014, 03:16 PM
Good to see some interest ,and it does give some assurance that there is interest out there and observant you are as well, yes there is one different tail shaft cover it came loose not on a car and it is basically the same gear box in side, it is the middle one and I am certain it is from a Morris of about the same years, the one on the left has the rear seal cover on, and none at that stage had the dust cover on, which I found did not just slide off because they are tapped into groove to hold them on I think in three or four places, they would of been hard to replace ,that is buying new ones I gently hacksawed the part in the groove and they came off ok, so just had to tap a new spot when put back on, there are firms that still supply parts for that gearbox, in the UK, but it gets very expensive with the shipping costs.
Wheelinround as far as I am concerned motorbike, truck, or transport of any kind is welcome if they are interested in posting if its restoring, its the same thing to me , If nobody is objecting I say go for it, get your restos in, by the way I am not a mechanic, so advise is always welcome.
Eddie

TKO
5th Jan 2015, 11:26 PM
Having put most of the running gear through the molasses or the Electrolysis system, I set to repairing where I found the need to do so the four drums I skimmed on my lathe and put on new brake relined shoes, and painted the drums,put new brake pipes in the brake system,and tapped the master cylinder to take a pipe up to the engine fire wall ,as the cylinder is under the the car, and to check the fluid you had to remove the carpet to get at the filler plug,so this I hope will save ever running out of fluid and not knowing it,I have since altered the plastic tube and done it all in copper pipe, the petrol line is in steel,
Its amazing how the photos don't come out in the right order, just like all the letters get missed or in the wrong place, its the only sub forum that does it. and or ever having to correct it, its a PITA .
Eddie

TKO
8th Jan 2015, 08:50 PM
It's to quiet to go on
.


Eddie

jhovel
8th Jan 2015, 11:08 PM
Hang on, we've had Christmas, New Year and its thre middle of people's holidays. I think this forum is doing quite well.
I'm interested!

I'm currently 'fixing up' not actually 'restoring' a 1989 Subaru Brumby I picked up cheap - along with a 'spare' 1982 model one...
Just got them both going tonight. Will clean them both up a bit and put the 1982 one on Gumtree or eBay. The motor is smokey and there's a fair bit of rust here and there. At least it's pretty complete.

The '89 one now has 14" Sunraisia wheels, some used rally tyres, great bullbar and as good as no rust - and the little that's there will converted and painted shortly.
It is going to be used as a 'farm ute' to play with and to teach my grandchildren to drive.... :)
This is what it looked like when I got it/them where I picked it/them up:
336184 336185
You have no idea what a pain in the a*** moving a car with only three wheels is....
Will put up a couple of 'after' photos tomorrow.

Gra
8th Jan 2015, 11:40 PM
Gday Gra. - "for some of us that is the only choice. My local dealer went bust about 70 Years ago..." - when i read that my warped sense of humour envisioned you sitting on a wooden crate still waiting.



Nah got a 20 ltr drum for that :)

Goggomobile
14th Jun 2015, 08:24 AM
Guys
is this post still going .. I've been a bit out of action since Xmas .... U name it it's

happened .... I'm now back on track with my Goggomobile projects ... Do you want an update ...

Ps I went to Cooly Rocks on at Coolangatta last week end .. I've got some good pics ...

Randal

Uncle Al
14th Jun 2015, 08:47 AM
An update would be great. Very interesting thread and would love to see how things have progressed.

Alan...

crowie
14th Jun 2015, 09:52 AM
An update would be great. Very interesting thread and would love to see how things have progressed.

Alan...


:iagree: Yes Please,

plus :photo2: too please of the car and the trip, thank you...

cheers, crowie

Simplicity
14th Jun 2015, 11:42 AM
Have I missed any of the action
Matt

cava
14th Jun 2015, 12:09 PM
:iagree: Yes Please,

plus :photo2: too please of the car and the trip, thank you...

cheers, crowie

:whs:

RoyG
14th Jun 2015, 07:15 PM
A close friend has just bought a Riley that is in need of considerable work. He's discovered that a lot of the wood in the body work is rotten from water exposure. (Not surprising, and not a new problem - my Dad sold his Riley in 1960 because it had wood rot in the roof frames.) I guess the English wood and the glues used when they built the car were not suited to Australian conditions. Being as the owner of the car is a metal working guy, he has asked me if I'd like to get involved in the woodworking side of the restoration. I haven't decided whether I want to get involved yet.

But anyway - does anyone know what Australian timber is best suited to use in the body framing of a car ?

Any thoughts,

RoyG

Goggomobile
14th Jun 2015, 08:01 PM
Left to Right - Rare Dart, Coupe, Sedan
The Dart is only one of two in existence .. With doors !!!
These were part of 6 on display .. I hope to have mine ready next year for the next Cooly Rocks On.

KBs PensNmore
14th Jun 2015, 09:58 PM
Hi Goggomobile, any chance of some updated pics of your work, please?
Kryn

ubeaut
22nd Aug 2015, 12:02 AM
This forum has been set up and will go live hopefully Sunday night 23rd August or Monday 24th August 2015 on the new Metalwork site: metalworkforums.com (http://www.metalworkforums.com) (not yet open for posting).

Initially there will be 2 forums as suggested here they will be under the forum header:

AUTOMOTIVE METALWORK
and the forums will be:
AUTO RESTORATION
and
AUTO PARTS / Wanted, For Sale - HELP

All the posts that were here in this thread except for the 3 above have been moved to that forum but are not currently viewable.

Cheers - Neil :U

ubeaut
22nd Aug 2015, 12:06 AM
Anyone with suggestions for other forums in this new section please put them in here for consideration.

KBs PensNmore
22nd Aug 2015, 06:40 PM
A BIG THANKS to you Neil, for doing this, and for your generosity in running this fantastic forum.:2tsup::2tsup:
Kryn

DSEL74
23rd Aug 2015, 01:25 PM
As I posted in the voting thread.
Section fir links to machine manuals, catalogues etc for old gear.
Vintage machines sub group.
Parts Wanted, place to post about that missing item.