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Euge
21st May 2015, 10:46 AM
Identifying Trees Shrubs in SE Qld

Below is a useful and easy-to-use manual for identification of plants of SE Qld which some may find helpful in identifying trees and large shrubs.


Tree identification Manual
For the north-east Darling Downs region

http://www.nedlandcare.org.au/pdf/Manual%209-11-11.pdf

dai sensei
21st May 2015, 01:53 PM
Looks really interesting and useful, just wish it had more species, but you can't have everything.

One thing though, when I download it there are a heap of blank pages, and no photos or maps. Is it just me or is something missing?

Euge
26th May 2015, 12:46 AM
...... wish it had more species, but you can't have everything.

One thing though, when I download it there are a heap of blank pages, and no photos or maps. Is it just me or is something missing?

Yes, more species would always be better. Many enquiries for wood id seem to come from SE Qld so thought this may be a useful link.

No, I dont have problems with the link and blank pages ... its seens all there. May be your computer (I use a Mac).

Cheers.

dai sensei
26th May 2015, 09:48 AM
I have mac too but still blank pages, for example 2,12,14,16 all blank. Anyone else have similar problem?

Jeffen
26th May 2015, 10:32 PM
Downloaded on PC, no issues, but interesting to note, the pages you mention are all
images.


No solution, but I hope this helps.

Happy to email you the pdf to see if that shows the missing pages.

Jeff

tree lopper
1st Jun 2015, 07:19 AM
Thanks for a great resource. I'm in Brisbane and we have a lot of the same trees as the guide.

I thought it was interesting that they list bloodwoods as Eucalyptus still, rather than Corymbia so I suggest it was probably prepared quite some time ago. It's going to come in handy for tree id.

dai sensei
1st Jun 2015, 11:06 AM
I thought it was interesting that they list bloodwoods as Eucalyptus still, rather than Corymbia so I suggest it was probably prepared quite some time ago.

Bloodwoods aren't Eucs? Gee I am aware of only 2 Corymbia's and thought they were just a different species under the common name of Bloodwoods based on here http://www.anbg.gov.au/common.names/ (type in bloodwood, there are heaps)

Euge
1st Jun 2015, 12:16 PM
The renaming of some plants has been a very contentious issue, especially iconic ones like Eucalyptus and Acacia. (Africa and Americas lost out with their Acacias). Splitting of Eucalyptus was more contentious within Australia. Bloodwoods represent a fairly large proportion of our eucalypts.

"Corymbia is a genus of about 113 species of tree that were classified as Eucalyptus species until the mid-1990s. It includes the bloodwoods, ghost gums and spotted gums….

…. Molecular research in the 1990s, however, showed that they, along with the rest of the Corymbia section, are more closely related to Angophora than to Eucalyptus, and are probably best regarded as a separate genus.

All three genera - Angophora, Corymbia and Eucalyptus - are closely related, often difficult to tell apart, and are still commonly and correctly referred to as "eucalypts". Groups of naturalists and conservationists do not recognise the Corymbia genus and still categorise its species within Eucalyptus…."

ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corymbia

Not all botanists like or accept this reclassification of a large subgenus of eucalypts … but it has largely and braidly been accepted now.

Euge
1st Jun 2015, 12:38 PM
Here is a link to the paper where Bloodwoods were re-classified as Corymbia by botanists, Hill and Johnson.

Corymbia K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson (https://biodiversity.org.au/boa/instance/apni/562323) | sensu Hill, K.D. & Johnson, L.A.S., (1995) Systematic studies in the eucalypts. 7. A revision of the bloodwoods, genus Corymbia (Myrtaceae). Telopea. 6(2-3) (https://biodiversity.org.au/boa/reference/apni/40399) (https://biodiversity.org.au/nsl/services/apc?publication=Hill%2C+K.D.+%26+Johnson%2C+L.A.S.%2C+%281995%29+Systematic+studies+in+the+eucalypts.++7.+A+revision+of+the+bloodwoods%2C+genus+Corymbia+%28Myrtaceae%29.+Telopea.+6%282-3%29&search=true&advanced=true&display=apc&tree.id=1133571)

Some common bloodwoods include the spotted gum, lemon-scented gums, Marri (eg the ormanental flowering gum from WA), inland bloodwoods like ghost gum, coastal red bloodwood along East Coast, carbeen and many more.

Confusing as this may seem, calling them all eucalypts is not wrong as long as we recognise that some eucalypts have been classified as Angophora or reclassified (renamed) as Corymbia .

dai sensei
1st Jun 2015, 02:26 PM
Crap. It's hard enough to keep up with all the weird and wonderful common names, I have no hope when they change the botanical names :doh:. I also had no idea spotty, ghost and all those others you listed were Bloodwoods :o

Bushmiller
1st Jun 2015, 07:03 PM
Yes, the Corymbias are a new group (relatively) as has been stated, that were originally Eucalypt. So, for example, Eucalyptus maculata (spotted gum) became Corymbia Maculata.

Interestingly, the Angophoras (rough barked apple etc) were orginally Eucalypts too, but were declassified as Eucalypts quite a long time ago.

Regards
Paul

Euge
1st Jun 2015, 07:54 PM
Crap. It's hard enough to keep up with all the weird and wonderful common names, I have no hope when they change the botanical names. I also had no idea spotty, ghost and all those others you listed were Bloodwoods


Don’t despair … its a problem we all face when interested in the identity and naming of trees and their woods. Using their old names is NOT incorrect as you refer to the same species. Just be mindful that botanical names are often being revised and changed for various reasons and we cant stop it. The ambiguity of COMMON names, well that gives rise to many many problems. At least botanical names (old and new) refer to ONE species.

Re the bloodwoods, the best way to easily identify them, with reasonable certainty, is to look at their fruits. They have urn-shaped fruits of various sizes from about 0.5 cm to 5 cm. (The Angophoras in comparison have ribbed fruits.)

The biggest recent reclassification happened when our Acacias (over 1000 species) almost lost their Genus name (Acacia)! Yikes!! Instead it was agreed that the Acacias from other lands (eg Africa and the Americas) were renamed and Australia kept the name Acacia for Australia. Phew!