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sacc51
16th Oct 2015, 08:24 AM
I agree in part with the new cycling laws but the legislators seem to have gone off on a tangent totally ignoring drivers.

How often do you see cyclists riding two abreast, or worse still the cycle club dopes who ride three and four abreast on the hilly twisting roads through the hills. No reason for doing that and it is just plain ignorant. Riding two or more abreast should be illegal.

I'm an avid cyclist, I ride four to five days a week with my wife, never do I ride two abreast: ignorant, dangerous and just plain stupid!

Allowing cyclists to ride on pathways is a great idea but speed limits and using your bell to signal overtaking should be mandatory. Giving way to pedestrians causes too many problems, anyone who has ridden a 'shared' pathway knows that pedestrians refuse to move over and let you pass no matter how much you ring your bell or yell 'excuse me'. After all, they have right of way - and they are going to stop you in your tracks at every available opportunity. A shared path should be shared, not commandeered, ride/walk on the left and give way to pedestrians/cyclist wanting to pass.

I can remember riding my recumbent trike along the beachfront pathway in Port Kennedy WA a few years ago, I came up behind two women walking side by side, I rang my bell, yelled out 'excuse me ladies' but they refused to allow me to pass. Eventually, one stopped, turned to me and said 'we have right of way'. and kept walking side by side.

wheelinround
16th Oct 2015, 10:00 AM
New cycling laws??? For which state or are they National laws??

Cycling single file used to be law in NSW although never a handbook type I recall when younger and that never changed its the pack mobs who ride like sheep being herded both on the road and on footpaths or shared.

Your ride in WA were/are the laws there same as everywhere else ???

sacc51
16th Oct 2015, 10:45 AM
???

sacc51
16th Oct 2015, 12:12 PM
New SA state laws. In SA cyclist are permitted to ride two abreast. Pedestrians have the right of way on shared paths in every state, that's the right of way, not the right to block other users.