PDA

View Full Version : What to Use ?.



issatree
13th Jan 2017, 11:35 PM
Hi to All,
Maybe having to Turn 12 Knife Cutlery Handles, as the Bone ones are disintegrating.
Planing on using Red Gum, so what finish do you think I should use.
Not sure if they will be used constantly, but will need a good finish anyway.
Thinking 2 Part Plastic ???.

Paul39
14th Jan 2017, 02:56 AM
If they will be hand washed and dried immediately I would use tung oil. Start with 1/2 mineral spirits, 1/2 tung oil and soak in well. keep applying several coats, then switch to straight tung oil. I do this on the lathe and after many coats and buffing with a cotton athletic sock can get as much shine as I want with many coats & buffing.

This gets the waterproofing finish down into the wood, as opposed to sitting on top.

I have done this on an oak door threshold that has stood up to rain, snow, heat, and cold for many years. Just by soaking and painting, not buffing.

Mobyturns
14th Jan 2017, 07:14 AM
Red gum might be a problem with its grain, depends upon how fine the handles will be. A film finish like 2 pack plastic will blister over time once moisture gets under it and it certainly will. Using a product like Floods Deks Olje is also an option as it uses an application process similar to Paul's recommendation. A thinned oil finish like Organ Oil's range that is built up will be suitable for non dishwasher use, if hand washed and dried.

pommyphil
14th Jan 2017, 07:23 AM
Why not bone again?

hughie
14th Jan 2017, 10:37 PM
Redgum as long as it well seasoned, by that i mean really old 50-100 years or so. Iron-bark or for that matter any of our hardwoods well seasoned. How big do the handles have to be. I have a fair amount of very old fiddleback Redgum off-cuts too small for me to do much with, as I no longer make knives.PM me if your interested. The Redgum is very old tree maybe 200 years and it cut down maybe 50 years ago, so I guess its seasoned ok :U

I agree with Paul on Tung oil, if oil is a bit pricey try multiple coats of DO . But mix your own at 30/30/30 mix and give a week or so after the final coat to dry.

issatree
15th Jan 2017, 12:54 AM
Hi Hughie,
Well it seems our Handles are about 3" or 90mm.
Thank you for your offer, but I have some Burl Red Gum, which I think may do.
Anyway I have yet to hear from the Lady.
I think I can find some Tung Oil, as I know a Chap who had a steel drum business, & he was forever wanting to get rid of all the TO he accumulated, but what I had I gave away.
Thanks again for your reply & offer.

Phily
15th Jan 2017, 10:02 AM
Out of curiosity would something like Cactus Juice be an option?

powderpost
15th Jan 2017, 07:43 PM
Why not bone again?


Actually, bone was never used for those old cutlery handles, it was in fact a plastic material made from casien, which is a byproduct of milk.

Jim

dai sensei
15th Jan 2017, 08:10 PM
Out of curiosity would something like Cactus Juice be an option?

Yes, I always recommend stabilised timbers for cutlery, and most knife makers want their handles stabilised

John.G
15th Jan 2017, 08:42 PM
If the Lady wants something closer to the original, I've got some figured Silver Quandong somewhere

Nubsnstubs
16th Jan 2017, 01:49 AM
Issatree, if I was to do something like that, I would prepare them for installing onto the knife, but soak them in a pressurized tank for a bit with either Cactus Juice or other stabilizer. When cured, a little sanding and install onto the knife. Wood will be sealed better than a rubbed on finish and would probably be water proof. .......Jerry (in Tucson)

pommyphil
16th Jan 2017, 06:43 AM
Actually, bone was never used for those old cutlery handles, it was in fact a plastic material made from casien, which is a byproduct of milk.

Jim
Thanks Jim.I'm amazed, and stand corrected,though I will discuss with my friend Google.

rtyuiop
16th Jan 2017, 08:11 AM
I've only done a few experimental pens with it so far, but Rustin's plastic (a 2 pack plastic) would probably work well. Seems reasonably easy to apply, too... Only downside to me is that it doesn't feel like wood in the end, but I think that'll be the case with any super hard wearing finish.

Maybe stabilise the blanks first, then make the handle, then finally hit it with Rustins?

dai sensei
16th Jan 2017, 10:07 PM
Issatree, if I was to do something like that, I would prepare them for installing onto the knife, but soak them in a pressurized tank for a bit with either Cactus Juice or other stabilizer. When cured, a little sanding and install onto the knife. Wood will be sealed better than a rubbed on finish and would probably be water proof. .......Jerry (in Tucson)

Stabilising with CJ or similar makes the blanks water resistant if done properly, using vacuum, but unfortunately not waterproof. Pressure soaking will help though, if you don't have a vacuum system, but the wood/bone still needs to be 100% dry (i.e. 0%MC). If your blank isn't completely dry, when you put it in he oven to set, any moisture will be boiled away forcing the CJ out of your blank.

Professional stabilising uses extremely high pressures and a different resin that effectively turns the sample into a plastic product.


..Maybe stabilise the blanks first, then make the handle, then finally hit it with Rustins?

Thant's what I do for cutlery