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Simplicity
26th Jan 2019, 08:43 PM
Your Attention Please , Your Attention

Saturday 6th April 2019




Me ,myself and Sal, will be running a saw handle making day demo thingy.
From the steel palace in our backyard.

Numbers are limited to 10 participants .
The scoop of the day is ,you arrive by 10 am and hopefully by days end you have a new saw handle
Simple.

Details:

We live in the sunny sometimes, country town of Ballarat ,Victoria.

10am sharp start time.

You need to provide your own materials ,we will not be providing materials.

Plus ,your own basic tool kit.
Hand files, rasps, chisels ,sandpaperís.
Tho ,I have some if you donít have everything (we will get you there)
We can discuss this more as the thread developers.
But ,we will provide supplements(food and drinks , (not the alcoholic kind).
We will also help with the rough cutting of your saw handle (Bandsaw disk sander)and guidance if needed.

This is for anyone who wants to sit down for a leisurely Saturday and knock out a saw handle .
You may be a seasoned professional having done dozens already , or you may have never made a saw handle or tool in your life.
It doesnt matter, for the less experienced makers amongst you , i will provide my limited ability and experience in helping you, but this is not to say Iím a professional saw handle maker lol.
But ,Iíve done a couple!

Iím no longer making saws.
https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?share_fid=10646&share_tid=225537&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Ewoodworkforums%2Ecom%2Fshowthread%2Ephp%3Ft%3D225537&share_type=t


The day will be based around our very large out door table(your work station for the day)
So ,if your new ,help will not be far away you probably wonít even need to get out of your chair.

I would suggest if your new to saw handle making ,to choose a open grip type handle.
(There generally easier, has basically they have less timber than a closed saw handle).
Or ,to find an old saw that needs a new handle made for it.

Those wanting to really dip there toe in tool making ,would be advised to obtain a saw plate ,saw back if you want a back saw ,plus saw nuts.
Bring along your chosen bit of timber and get into it.

Cheers Matt.
First in first served.

DaveTTC
26th Jan 2019, 09:40 PM
I plan to be there


Dave TTC
The Turning Cowboy

Turning Wood Into Art

Simplicity
27th Jan 2019, 08:52 PM
I plan to be there


Dave TTC
The Turning Cowboy

Turning Wood Into Art
Look forward to seeing you there Dave.

Well thatís two bunnies making saw handles on a Saturday.

Cheers Matt.

Benny_
29th Jan 2019, 04:38 PM
Will be there.

Simplicity
29th Jan 2019, 05:10 PM
Will be there.

Excellent Benny will be looking forward to it.
Any ideas of what you want to make yet ?.

Cheers Matt

Benny_
29th Jan 2019, 05:23 PM
Excellent Benny will be looking forward to it.
Any ideas of what you want to make yet ?.

Cheers Matt

I reckon something like what you showed me on Saturday, though it does look difficult. Could you send me a link to the saw blade you showed me as well?

Simplicity
29th Jan 2019, 06:04 PM
I reckon something like what you showed me on Saturday, though it does look difficult. Could you send me a link to the saw blade you showed me as well?

Benny.
The link
Black burn tools.
Blackburn Tools - Simply Classic (http://www.blackburntools.com/)

Look for there Australia distributor under contact us.

I wouldnít say making a saw handle is a five minute job.
But like a lot of wood working stuff itís a lot of little steps one at a time.
If you canít see what you want or $$ is tight Benny shoot me a Pm.
Iím sure I can find some stuff to get you small saw started.

Cheers Matt,
Pinched this shot from google if this pic is yours thank you.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190129/8ac7b305006601d3942566b2f85b0619.jpg

Oldgreybeard
30th Jan 2019, 08:15 AM
My calendar is full for that date, which is probably good as my neck and shoulder is sore enough without any additional sore making

Bushmiller
30th Jan 2019, 08:50 AM
I would love to attend this one, but I have checked the roster and it is not possible. Why I say I would like to attend is because I have a small list of saws I wish to make up. I will show them here because it may give an idea for the more adventurous:

The first is Woodrough McParlin's classic Panther head saw featured on their No.12 model. Note that the handle is carved both sides:

448649448644448648
448671

The second is a Wheeler Madden & Clemson No.25 version of the thumbhole saw:

448646

and the third is a "toolbox" saw, which is a full size 26" handsaw with the handle let in so the overall length is contained to 26". Nearly all the major manufacturers had one of these: Disston, GH Bishop, Atkins too, I think. This is the Simonds version: The No.56.

448647

Arguably not all for the beginner :wink: .

This link may also be of use for handle templates from the TGIAG (Two Guys In A Garage) website:

https://www.tgiag.com/saw-handle-scans.html

Print them full size and you have a classic handle right there for your use.

All the best for the workshop. It will be a goodun' .

Regards
Paul

Edit: I added the panther head patent details (now expired :D) for the brave.

Bushmiller
30th Jan 2019, 08:55 AM
My calendar is full for that date, which is probably good as my neck and shoulder is sore enough without any additional sore making

OGB

Does that make you a saw loser? :rolleyes:

Sorry to hear of your discomfort. Aches and pains should be banned.

Regards
Paul

A Duke
30th Jan 2019, 11:23 AM
OGB

Does that make you a saw loser? :rolleyes:

Sorry to hear of your discomfort. Aches and pains should be banned.

Regards
Paul


I take pains to avoid them.
Regards

Simplicity
30th Jan 2019, 12:47 PM
I would love to attend this one, but I have checked the roster and it is not possible. Why I say I would like to attend is because I have a small list of saws I wish to make up. I will show them here because it may give an idea for the more adventurous:

The first is Woodrough McParlin's classic Panther head saw featured on their No.12 model. Note that the handle is carved both sides:

448649448644448648

The second is a Wheeler Madden & Clemson No.25 version of the thumbhole saw:

448646

and the third is a "toolbox" saw, which is a full size 26" handsaw with the handle let in so the overall length is contained to 26". Nearly all the major manufacturers had one of these: Disston, GH Bishop, Atkins too, I think. This is the Simonds version: The No.56.

448647

Arguably not all for the beginner :wink: .

This link may also be of use for handle templates from the TGIAG (Two Guys In A Garage) website:

https://www.tgiag.com/saw-handle-scans.html

Print them full size and you have a classic handle right there for your use.

All the best for the workshop. It will be a goodun' .

Regards
Paul

Thanks Paul,
For chipping in and thanks for the link to the saw handle templates.

Note point anyone wanting to attend and make a quick buck.
I may have a buyer in Queensland for a saw handle if you can carve a kitty cat on the front.[emoji6]

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
31st Jan 2019, 09:21 PM
I will be there as a participant if you will have me. Jools will probably be with me and can keep Sally company for the day. :2tsup:

I have half a dozen saws "in progress" at various stages from component parts to advanced planning so not sure what I will be working on the day but it will be something. :wink:

Simplicity
31st Jan 2019, 09:28 PM
I will be there as a participant if you will have me. Jools will probably be with me and can keep Sally company for the day. :2tsup:

I have half a dozen saws "in progress" at various stages from component parts to advanced planning so not sure what I will be working on the day but it will be something. :wink:

I have been patiently waiting your reply
Considering comments at Dave Gtg lol

Your both welcome

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
31st Jan 2019, 09:38 PM
I have been patiently waiting your reply
Considering comments at Dave Gtg lol

Your both welcome

Thanks Matt, Here's a little something I'm thinking about at the moment.

448792

Simplicity
31st Jan 2019, 09:44 PM
Thanks Matt, Here's a little something I'm thinking about at the moment.

448792

I have one on the Great Wall of saw if you want to take some 3D inspiration.

Cheers Matt,
Itís staying on Saturday after you leave [emoji849].

doug3030
31st Jan 2019, 09:49 PM
I have one on the Great Wall of saw if you want to take some 3D inspiration.

Cheers Matt,
It’s staying on Saturday after you leave [emoji849].

For the pic, I just laid the template over the existing handle, but when it becomes timber I want to move it forward about an inch so the end of the sawplate is about half way across the hand hole. I have a picture of what I want somewhere. I will try to find it tomorrow

doug3030
31st Jan 2019, 10:27 PM
For the pic, I just laid the template over the existing handle, but when it becomes timber I want to move it forward about an inch so the end of the sawplate is about half way across the hand hole. I have a picture of what I want somewhere. I will try to find it tomorrow

Found it:

448800

Bushmiller
31st Jan 2019, 11:07 PM
Doug

You will have to modify the shape of the saw plate to accept the new handle, which as you have probably assessed gives more control and power. If you removed the Disston D8 handle you would see a curved plate. However I would suggest cutting at an angle to keep the plate in the timber. The curve is easy in the steel, but difficult with the kerf in wood. The Disston is also a "covertop," which means the blade does not reach the top of the handle: More problematic again.

Really good project. What is the timber?

Regards
Paul

doug3030
31st Jan 2019, 11:21 PM
You will have to modify the shape of the saw plate to accept the new handle, which as you have probably assessed gives more control and power. If you removed the Disston D8 handle you would see a curved plate. However I would suggest cutting at an angle to keep the plate in the timber. The curve is easy in the steel, but difficult with the kerf in wood. The Disston is also a "covertop," which means the blade does not reach the top of the handle: More problematic again.

Been working on that:

448803


Really good project. What is the timber?

Thanks. I hope to finish a couple of simpler backsaw handles first, but if I don't have at least 15 projects in the pipeline I feel lost.

The backsaw handles are walnut, but I'm not sure I have enough left for the big ripsaw and crosscut saw. Possibly sheoak or rosewood.

Early days yet.

Bushmiller
1st Feb 2019, 01:17 AM
The backsaw handles are walnut, but I'm not sure I have enough left for the big ripsaw and crosscut saw. Possibly sheoak or rosewood.

Early days yet.

Doug

Nice timbers. Lucky you.

Regards
Paul

doug3030
1st Feb 2019, 07:25 AM
Nice timbers. Lucky you.

Thanks - I like to attribute it to good planning and judgement rather than luck.:wink:

Simplicity
1st Feb 2019, 07:50 AM
Doug you will also have to mindful of the original saw bolt holes, making sure the new ones donít end up on the edges of the old ones.

Cheers Matt,

doug3030
1st Feb 2019, 09:08 AM
Doug you will also have to mindful of the original saw bolt holes, making sure the new ones donít end up on the edges of the old ones.

Got that thanks. Do you speak from personal experience there, Matt? :rolleyes:

Simplicity
1st Feb 2019, 09:34 AM
Got that thanks. Do you speak from personal experience there, Matt? :rolleyes:

No not yet [emoji6]

doug3030
1st Feb 2019, 05:48 PM
You will have to modify the shape of the saw plate to accept the new handle, which as you have probably assessed gives more control and power. If you removed the Disston D8 handle you would see a curved plate. However I would suggest cutting at an angle to keep the plate in the timber. The curve is easy in the steel, but difficult with the kerf in wood. The Disston is also a "covertop," which means the blade does not reach the top of the handle: More problematic again


Doug you will also have to mindful of the original saw bolt holes, making sure the new ones donít end up on the edges of the old ones.

Here is a pic of the sawplate with the template in the place the new handle will be and the old handle superimposed in its original position.

448817

As can be seen this will place the old holes well behind the new holes so that will not be a problem.

I want to make sure that everyone understands that while I have a template of a D-8 handle, I am not necessarily trying to make a historical reproduction of a Disston saw. The sawplate I am using, while it is a Disston, it is not a D-8. As much as I have admired and appreciated Bushmiller's historical saw builds, that is not what I am about. All the saws I am planning to make are to be users. The interest in the thumbhole handle is to allow me to make allowances for my back problems by allowing me to do some of the work in the "two-handed-sitting-on-the-board-across-the-sawbenches" position. The differences in the sawplate geometry of the plate I am using and the D-8 plate may even require some adjustments in the hang angle or even stuff I haven't thought of yet. Since it is not a historical reconstruction it really does not bother me if the handle is not a covertop, but that sort of information is still of interest to me as I learn.

I have sawplates and brass backs for four backsaws, with Blackburn handles all cut out on a bandsaw, plus Disston saws to rehandle and resharpen to what I want for the full-sized crosscut and rip saws. After that I will probably have sufficient left-over sawplate for a couple of small gents saws and some specialty items. Some parts of this project will be what I take to Matt's handle-making day. I have no idea what it will be yet.

However I might just go and start a separate thread for the whole project before it takes over Matt's GTG thread and because it could become a valuable resource in its own right, so long as no "Large Outbuilding" comes along to interfere.

Simplicity
1st Feb 2019, 06:58 PM
Doug,
I have no problem you discussing your saw handle build here,I would go as far as encouraging it.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190201/5d96da14f9c32082b840e3fd6e863820.jpg
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190201/3ff61c85cf41e0ec5dc7c334219f3783.jpg

Cheers Matt,

Simplicity
7th Feb 2019, 07:01 PM
Shameless bump

Anybody else interested

Cheers Matt.

Bushmiller
7th Feb 2019, 08:31 PM
I would love to attend but alas, just too far away for the moment.

However, as a gesture of good faith, if the only thing preventing anybody coming along is a suitable timber for the handle, make it known here or, if you prefer, PM me and I will post something off to Matt so it will be there there for the big day. No charge as I have some spare bits and pieces :wink: .

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
7th Feb 2019, 09:09 PM
I would love to attend but alas, just too far away for the moment.

However, as a gesture of good faith, if the only thing preventing anybody coming along is a suitable timber for the handle, make it known here or, if you prefer, PM me and I will post something off to Matt so it will be there there for the big day. No charge as I have some spare bits and pieces :wink: .

Regards
Paul

Now that is outstanding generosity Mr Bushmilliar.
Thank you very much.

I can tell you folks, from personal experience Paul has some nice stuff.
I know because I have two very nice pieces of timber waiting to be turned in to saw handles.


Cheers Matt.

Chris Parks
7th Feb 2019, 11:50 PM
You need to provide your own materials ,we will not be providing materials.

Plus ,your own basic tool kit.
Hand files, rasps, chisels ,sandpaper’s.


Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?

Simplicity
8th Feb 2019, 10:20 PM
Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?

A CNC machine would possibly speed things up considerably but I donít have one nor the knowledge or brains to use one Criss.

Ok back to us basic shed dwellers.
I use a bandsaw to cut the blank, I also use a trim router with a small round over bit to hog off some off the waste.
But I find most of the work is just sanding and smoothing and fennsing the shape which just takes time.

But I think the most fussy thing to cut is the backsaw Mitre slot if your doing a back saw that is.

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
8th Feb 2019, 11:08 PM
Matt, what would the basic needs be to make a handle in a day, anything in addition to the above to speed things up?

Personally, I cannot see myself making just a handle in isolation. I would need the other components - the sawplate, brass back and sawnuts - available to make the handle to accept all the other components. You can't exactly make a handle then go out and find the sawplate to fit what you have cut. Unless you make your own sawnuts, you would have to drill the holes in the handle to suit the nuts, not make the nuts to fit the holes.

I would welcome input from the more experienced sawmakers here but, the way I see it, first you decide what you want the saw to do (rip/crosscut, fine detailed work or roughing out, hardwood or softwood etc). that will determine what sawplate you want and how to configure it - thickness, TPI, rip/crosscut, pitch, rake, fleam, length - and will determine if it will be a backsaw, panelsaw, gents saw, bowsaw etc. Then once you have all these details worked out then you design a handle that will hold all the bits and put your hand in a suitable position to use the saw comfortably and accurately.

I see little point in turning up and making a saw handle in isolation as the chances of it ever being united with all the other parts to make a practical saw are pretty remote. I might be off track here but that's how I see it.

Maybe Paul and Ian could provide some input to this.

Chris Parks
9th Feb 2019, 12:18 AM
So, the idea is to knock out the basic shape using your bandsaw and trim router then onto hand fettling the rest. I saw someone somewhere using a spindle sander for shaping, is this a good idea or not? I am inclined to have a bit of a trip down to say hello and make a handle if things go to plan, it should be getting a bit cooler by then.

Bushmiller
9th Feb 2019, 07:53 AM
I can post a little more detail at a later date if there is a request, but a brief comment is there are two distinct scenarios: Firstly you are making a saw up from scratch requiring all components including timber, saw screws and back if you are making a back saw, Secondly making a new handle for an existing saw in which case you already have the hardware. I would suggest that to complete the first scenario will be difficult in your time frame of a single day, but the second is very "doable."

You may be making a new handle for many reasons. The old handle could be broken, non existent or just plain butt ugly like anything made after WW2 and some even before that time. My sequence is cut out the rough blank, refine the outline, cut the saw slot, drill the holes for the saw screws and then do all the shaping of edges and other refinements that tart up a block of wood to make into something to be admired. Surface finishing may not be completed the same day but that depends on the style you chose. Ian uses a technique that could be done on the same day.

Regards
Paul

doug3030
9th Feb 2019, 08:50 AM
Secondly making a new handle for an existing saw in which case you already have the hardware. I would suggest that to complete the first scenario will be difficult in your time frame of a single day, but the second is very "doable."

Good point Paul. Even though I havetwo saws that I am making new handles for over time I am obviously concentrating more on the scratch builds of the backsaws in the project.

With a replacement handle build, you would still have the sawplate, brass back and sawnuts on hand to use to fit the new handle to.

Simplicity
9th Feb 2019, 12:37 PM
So, the idea is to knock out the basic shape using your bandsaw and trim router then onto hand fettling the rest. I saw someone somewhere using a spindle sander for shaping, is this a good idea or not? I am inclined to have a bit of a trip down to say hello and make a handle if things go to plan, it should be getting a bit cooler by then.

Chris,

You would be most welcome, and if we can assist in any way please shoutout.

A little bit more detail on what I do, with out the sarcasm [emoji849].
But as Paul and my self and Ian have discussed there is many ways to skin a cat.

First I get my saw blank cut to a rough square shape and thickness to about 22 mm thick
22 mm is my preferred thickness but not the rule.

Next I draw or use a pattern to draw out the shape of the saw handle on the stock.

I then now cut this roughly out with a bandsaw, but only on the outside of the handle, I donít bother getting rid of the waste on the inside quite yet.
Next and I feel this is the most important step of the whole saw making process.

I cut the saw slot for the blade in the saw handle cheek.
My reasoning is this, the trickiest bit to get right if itís not right you need to start again,hence why I do it very early on.

Once the saw slot is done and straight, I feel more comfortable doing the rest of the saw handle.

I now cut out the centre waste using forsner bits followed by using a disk sander and a bobbin sander to clean up and square the edge of the handle to the face sides and using various files on the inside weíre I canít reach with the bobbin sander,
Once the edgers are square i can then use the trim router with a small pattern round over bit to hog of the waste weíre needed.
Then follows the sanding rounding sanding sanding till itís all nice and smooth and feeling comfortable in my hand.
Finally the saw blade is reinserted and I start the process of drilling for the saw bolts extra.

This is for a handsaw a backsaw is slightly more involved as you have the back mortise as well to do.

I hope this helps in a little way.

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
9th Feb 2019, 03:15 PM
I was going through the timber stash looking for something for another job and I found this nice piece of sheoak.

Over the jointer and through the thicknesser it went.

Cleaned up alright and I should be able to get the two handles I need for my full-sized Disstons.

449199

Bushmiller
9th Feb 2019, 03:41 PM
Doug

I appreciate that the pic you posted is going to end up with a thumbhole handle a la D8/D-8, but I had meant to point out that the damaged handle is one of the classic shapes. I call that style the No.12 Lookalikes.

You can see where they were used in this old thread: Almost every manufacturer aspired to such a handle.

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f152/12-210480

In fact, although I have concentrated on Simonds saws for collector purposes, I have a few other areas of interest which include the No.12 "Lookalikes." This saw that I acquired recently is similar to yours in that it has the shape but lacks wheat carving. I don't know who made this one pictured as I have not received it yet: I may still not be able to identify a maker. very likely one of the major players.

449200449201449202

I expect you are sold on the thumbhole style, but this too is a very attractive handle. It would look magnificent in that she oak, but so would any handle :) .

Regards
Paul

doug3030
9th Feb 2019, 04:31 PM
I appreciate that the pic you posted is going to end up with a thumbhole handle a la D8/D-8, but I had meant to point out that the damaged handle is one of the classic shapes. I call that style the No.12 Lookalikes.

...

I expect you are sold on the thumbhole style, but this too is a very attractive handle. It would look magnificent in that she oak, but so would any handle :) .

Thanks for the info and link Paul.

Yes I do want the thumbhole handle as I explained before. I certainly do not dislike the original handle and in fact, it was intact when I got it. Due to unfortunate circumstances a visitor passing through the shed managed to dislodge the saw from its safe resting place causing it to fall onto the concrete floor handle end first and broke the bottom off as well as the top horn. It defies belief how far out of his way this person went to have his little accident.

Had that not happened I probably would not be bothering with rehandling it at all, but it is what it is.

As I said before, that saw will be my rip-saw.

The picture below is the one I will be making into my crosscut saw (currently filed rip). This one looks like a D-8.

449203

Bushmiller
9th Feb 2019, 06:40 PM
The picture below is the one I will be making into my crosscut saw (currently filed rip). This one looks like a D-8.

449203

Doug

I may have confused exactly what you were doing in my mind and not appreciated you were modifying two saws. That saw certainly looks like a D-8.

Regards
Paul

doug3030
9th Feb 2019, 08:44 PM
I may have confused exactly what you were doing in my mind and not appreciated you were modifying two saws. That saw certainly looks like a D-8.


Just to make sure it's clear, Paul.

Saw number 1. No 12 lookalike, currently filed rip - getting a D-8 thumbhole handle in sheoak and becoming my ripsaw.

Saw number 2. D-8 currently filed rip - refiling as crosscut, probably leave existing handle for now (it's in good condition) but later make a duplicate of its current handle in sheoak to match the other one.

doug3030
14th Feb 2019, 03:14 PM
I went out to the shed this morning fully intending to work on the Thumbhole handle for my saw.

I went to start up the 14 inch bandsaw and remembered why I had not used it for a few years. :rolleyes:

One of our offspring had been given permission to use the bandsaw for a small project and decided to also use it to cut up big blocks of beeswax. :oo:

She was making candles to sell at markets to make some money but finished up paying out $50 site fees and selling $10 worth of candles and bath bombs so she eventually lost interest in that.

But anyway, I was left with a bandsaw full of bees wax, so that turned out to be my project for the day. NEVER EVER let anyone cut up beeswax on your bandsaw. :no:

I am not sure how long the bandsaw ran before the blade slipped off the back of the wheels, brining that ill-advised activity to an abrupt end, but in that short time the entire inside of the cabinet got splattered, the blade guides were covered, the tyres were fully waxed; even the trunion got more than its fair share. There was wax everywhere.

I basically stripped the whole bandsaw back to its component parts, with the exception of removing the motor which remained unaffected, and the top wheel mount/blade tensioning mechanism, which was somehow spared the wax, probably due to it being located in the centre of the top wheel and the wax being distributed by centrifugal force.

Half a bottle of kerosene later I have a clean bandsaw. While it was all in pieces I did any maintenance that looked due, such as dressing the tyres and the blade guides. Tyres got spun on the drive wheel and sanded smooth (120 grit to remove the irregularities and 240 grit to finish) while ensuring the crown was preserved and the blade guides went on the metal lathe to be re-faced - first time I have used the lathe on steel. :cool:

It is nearly all back together now but final assembly will probably keep me busy until it is time to start cooking the roast lamb for Valentines Day dinner. So I probably won't get any saw handle making done today. Oh, and I better get all the beeswax out of the kitchen sink before I pick Jools up from the train too. :wink:

Bushmiller
14th Feb 2019, 04:47 PM
Doug

On the positive side I am guessing there was very little rust.

Regards
Paul

doug3030
14th Feb 2019, 06:38 PM
On the positive side I am guessing there was very little rust.

No rust to speak of Paul. There was more rust on the new blade that had been hanging around waiting for me to clean the bandsaw than there was anywhere else. :D

On the other side of the coin, somewhere along the line, probably when moving house the base has taken a knock and only three legs will touch the ground at a time. I loosened all the bolts but still no joy, so I removed each bolt one at a time and drilled the holes out a bit bigger. I didn't quite finish that before I had to go and get dinner started for Valentines Day.

449412

Simplicity
14th Feb 2019, 07:18 PM
No rust to speak of Paul. There was more rust on the new blade that had been hanging around waiting for me to clean the bandsaw than there was anywhere else. :D

On the other side of the coin, somewhere along the line, probably when moving house the base has taken a knock and only three legs will touch the ground at a time. I loosened all the bolts but still no joy, so I removed each bolt one at a time and drilled the holes out a bit bigger. I didn't quite finish that before I had to go and get dinner started for Valentines Day.

449412

Doug,
Will now be taking over head of catering at the handle saw day thingy.
Looks like weíre having roast for lunch.
I canít wait, I love a good roast.
Doug if you could just have your peoples talk to my peoples that would be much appreciate.

Cheers Matt.

Bushmiller
14th Feb 2019, 08:14 PM
Doug,
Will now be taking over head of catering at the handle saw day thingy.
Looks like we’re having roast for lunch.
I can’t wait, I love a good roast.
Doug if you could just have your peoples talk to my peoples that would be much appreciate.

Cheers Matt.

Umm. There's no such thing as free lunch :wink: , but I'm seriously tempted to travel.

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
14th Feb 2019, 09:22 PM
Umm. There's no such thing as free lunch :wink: , but I'm seriously tempted to travel.

Regards
Paul

Sally runs a full wet bar.

Oldgreybeard
15th Feb 2019, 08:08 AM
Sally runs a full wet bar.

Don't believe it - it doesn't work like that......only water in the full wet bar

doug3030
16th Feb 2019, 09:30 PM
With my bandsaw now working like new again, I was able to cut out a perspex template for the thumbhole handle. I also had to get my scrollsaw back into working order to do the handhole and thumbhole.

With the scroll saw working again, I also cut out the hand holes in two other backsaw handles which I had bandsawn a while ago. :2tsup:

Now I have three backsaw handles ready to fit and shape and a perspex template done.

These are tasks I am better off doing in my own shed with my own gear before heading up to Matt's handle making day. There will still be plenty of work to do on them when I get there.

449511

DSEL74
16th Feb 2019, 09:49 PM
What are you planning for work holding, when shaping all these handles on the day Matt?

Simplicity
17th Feb 2019, 07:01 AM
What are you planning for work holding, when shaping all these handles on the day Matt?

I have a few vices so hopefully we can get people clamped down[emoji23].
Depending how many attendees we have, I may need to look into asking people to bring there own vice.

Iím just concerned that the day turns into one big massive self help group with all these weird vices going around tho.

Cheers Matt [emoji23][emoji23].

Simplicity
17th Feb 2019, 07:03 AM
I have a few vices so hopefully we can get people clamped down[emoji23].
Depending how many attendees we have, I may need to look into asking people to bring there own vice.

Iím just concerned that the day turns into one big massive self help group with all these weird vices going around tho.

Cheers Matt [emoji23][emoji23].

doug3030
17th Feb 2019, 10:51 AM
Depending how many attendees we have, I may need to look into asking people to bring there own vice.

I could be persuaded to bring my travelling workbench. In addition to the holdfasts I use in the kids' mallet making classes at Dave's GTG I also have wonderdogs and a Z-Vise that I use on that bench. Plenty of space for two to work at, three is possible, even four if they are very good friends. :roll:

Bushmiller
17th Feb 2019, 12:03 PM
I have a few vices so hopefully we can get people clamped down[emoji23].
Depending how many attendees we have, I may need to look into asking people to bring there own vice.

Iím just concerned that the day turns into one big massive self help group with all these weird vices going around tho.

Cheers Matt [emoji23][emoji23].

I now have this image in my mind:

You are all seated in a circle. Matt holds the floor:

"My name is Matt and I'm an addict. I want to share my vices with you ." (Huge round of applause) :D

Regards
Paul

Bushmiller
17th Feb 2019, 06:56 PM
Aw.... pictures Doug?

You are putting me in a really awkward position.

I looked up images for addiction and that was, how can I put it, too realistic. So I looked for "indecent obsession" thinking it might be similar (pure conjecture on my part you understand), but there must have been some sort of musical group with this name and showed nothing very interesting at all. Anyhow it wasn't what I was looking for.

Then I thought "fetish" could come close. This is the definition



1.
a form of sexual desire in which gratification is linked to an abnormal degree to a particular object, item of clothing, part of the body, etc.
!important]"a man with a fetish for surgical masks"

2.
an inanimate object worshipped for its supposed magical powers or because it is considered to be inhabited by a spirit.


Now this was very interesting and although the second meaning was maybe more appropriate, I decided to research both in the interests of science and to a lesser extent to appease Doug. I am now much more worldly as a result of my research, but there was little I could post picture-wise without incurring some criticism.


So then I looked up vice and it seems I can't spell as the sort I wanted was listed under "vise." However there was nothing there that you haven't seen before (which was not the same story with fetish.)

So lastly here are my two dedicated handle making vices, which you have probably seen before, but are the best I could come up with under the circumstances (the circumstances being primarily censorship.

449572449573449574449575

In trying to find my vices (for handle making) I also turned up another picture I had saved as maybe useful and more quickly made.

449576

Sorry the pix are not more exciting. Those I rejected certainly were.

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
17th Feb 2019, 08:46 PM
Paul,
I assume all is well, that can be well, north of weíre Iím am sitting [emoji849].
Please check the use by dates, of the after 11 am beverages.
Thank you very much for a delightful or delicious if you want to fall that far, very narrow selection of beautiful English words.

Your red vice is that new !!
I just get back to reading the marquis de sade Iím fairly sure I heard there was a reference to saws in there somewhere.

Cheers Matt.

Bushmiller
17th Feb 2019, 11:14 PM
Your red vice is that new !!


Nope. It appeared in the thread you had on vices.

Regards
Paul

Bushmiller
18th Feb 2019, 11:51 AM
Matt

This was your thread. I hadn't realised it was so long ago.

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f44/grip-vices-205263

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
18th Feb 2019, 05:58 PM
Matt

This was your thread. I hadn't realised it was so long ago.

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f44/grip-vices-205263

Regards
Paul

Thanks Paul,

Well that was a trip down memory lane, and my vice has progressed about as far as how politicians becoming honest.

Cheers Matt [emoji849]

Simplicity
18th Feb 2019, 08:34 PM
A little update for those attending or those considering attending.

Iíve done a lot of soul searching, and this could be possibly the hardest some would say dumbest thing ever Iíve done.
But sometimes you just have to man it up, I even think woman should man it up too.
Tho they will possibly man it up better than me.
Ok with a big breath and Iíve never ever ever done this in a social media kind of way.
Iíve had a bit of saw cleansing, and will have a few saws to sell at the saw handle making thingy day.
Prices starting at $0,00AU and upwards.
Will post some pics on the weekend(Note point donít go losing sleep over it or getting to exciting think more bargain basement type saws.
Some still even have sort of teeth on them)

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
21st Feb 2019, 10:45 AM
Matt,

I am not sure whether to curse you or thank you for starting all this. It seems all the gear I need to make saw handles was in a state of disrepair or pending an upgrade.

First of all I had to fix my 14" bandsaw, then I had to put my scroll saw back together and now I have had to pull my drill press apart and build a dust box under it to incorporate sanding drums into the setup.

I took the auxiliary table off of the drill press and made and attached a plywood box under it with a port for a vacuum cleaner hose. The table has sacrificial inserts in the drilling area. I opened up the bottom of the insert mortise so that it now goes right through the table leaving a small lip on all four sides to support the sacrificial inserts for drilling and also the new inserts I made with holes a bit larger than the sanding drums that go into the drill chuck.

I had an offcut piece of 9mm MDF with a hardwood veneer on one side, which was the right thickness for the sanding inserts. The veneer should make them more durable and they are much smoother to make moving the workpiece over the sander easier. It made 14 inserts. I have eight sizes of sanding drums so plenty for spares in case I need ot make custom sized drums.

The port to attach the vacuum is removable by four screws to allow easy access inside the box if needed and also to allow a 4" dusty port to be attached if needed.

(Mandatory paragraph to appease the dust fanatics) Initial indications are that there would not be enough air able to enter the box for a 4" dusty to be worth while and the vacuum is working perfectly to remove dust from the table. I am using other collection methods to deal with any airborne dust that the vacuum misses or generates.

Anyway, the drill press auxiliary table is still fully functional and has only been modified by cutting out the base of the insert mortise. It works exactly the same as it used to, but now I have the added advantage of the sanding capability with no mess.

So thanks Matt, for motivating me to get on with some overdue jobs, but I'm not sure I really need to be this busy.

Six weeks to go.

449724449723

doug3030
21st Feb 2019, 03:01 PM
I just had another look at the pictures above and they don't really show much of the box - I need more light in the shed if I want it to double as a photography studio.

SO here's a picture of the box and the vac port prior to fitting.

449738

Simplicity
21st Feb 2019, 08:36 PM
Matt,

I am not sure whether to curse you or thank you for starting all this. It seems all the gear I need to make saw handles was in a state of disrepair or pending an upgrade.

First of all I had to fix my 14" bandsaw, then I had to put my scroll saw back together and now I have had to pull my drill press apart and build a dust box under it to incorporate sanding drums into the setup.

I took the auxiliary table off of the drill press and made and attached a plywood box under it with a port for a vacuum cleaner hose. The table has sacrificial inserts in the drilling area. I opened up the bottom of the insert mortise so that it now goes right through the table leaving a small lip on all four sides to support the sacrificial inserts for drilling and also the new inserts I made with holes a bit larger than the sanding drums that go into the drill chuck.

I had an offcut piece of 9mm MDF with a hardwood veneer on one side, which was the right thickness for the sanding inserts. The veneer should make them more durable and they are much smoother to make moving the workpiece over the sander easier. It made 14 inserts. I have eight sizes of sanding drums so plenty for spares in case I need ot make custom sized drums.

The port to attach the vacuum is removable by four screws to allow easy access inside the box if needed and also to allow a 4" dusty port to be attached if needed.

(Mandatory paragraph to appease the dust fanatics) Initial indications are that there would not be enough air able to enter the box for a 4" dusty to be worth while and the vacuum is working perfectly to remove dust from the table. I am using other collection methods to deal with any airborne dust that the vacuum misses or generates.

Anyway, the drill press auxiliary table is still fully functional and has only been modified by cutting out the base of the insert mortise. It works exactly the same as it used to, but now I have the added advantage of the sanding capability with no mess.

So thanks Matt, for motivating me to get on with some overdue jobs, but I'm not sure I really need to be this busy.

Six weeks to go.

449724449723

Doug,
Glad I could be of assistance, the drill press thingy table bit thingy looks excellent.
Iíve never consider a career in motivational speaking but immmmm [emoji56][emoji56][emoji56].
Is there much money in it.

Cheers Matt.
Did you say only six weeks till I need to be ready
ďSALLY SALLY SALLYĒ

doug3030
28th Feb 2019, 11:31 AM
I got my new toy today - Liogier Handle-maker's Rasp

449984

Brett (FenceFurniture) put it up for sale in the Marketplace http://www.woodworkforums.com/f221/liogier-handle-makers-rasp-9-sapphire-coated-brand-100-a-226382#post2128735

I have a lot of handles to make so this should come in handy right now and in the future with other projects other than saw-making too.

Bushmiller
28th Feb 2019, 11:44 AM
Doug

I saw that you bought that. Good choice.

Regards
Paul

doug3030
28th Feb 2019, 01:53 PM
I saw that you bought that. Good choice.

Thanks Paul,

I have a couple of Auriau rasps, which have convinced me that it's worth paying out for quality rasps.

Hopefully Liogier is of a similar quality to the Auriau ones.

Simplicity
28th Feb 2019, 06:56 PM
Thanks Paul,

I have a couple of Auriau rasps, which have convinced me that it's worth paying out for quality rasps.

Hopefully Liogier is of a similar quality to the Auriau ones.

Doug,
Are there any chance you will be bringing them with you in April.
I would like to have a closer look if I may.

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
28th Feb 2019, 07:03 PM
Doug,
Are there any chance you will be bringing them with you in April.
I would like to have a closer look if I may.

If I am making timber handles, they will be in my toolbox :2tsup:

Yes, you can check them out, mate :cool:

Simplicity
13th Mar 2019, 09:40 PM
Shameless bump.


Cheers Matt.
(Not to far away now folks)

doug3030
13th Mar 2019, 10:38 PM
Shameless bump.

I am slowly getting stuff together for this event.

I raided the scrap bin at Williamstown metal yesterday and purchased some offcuts of half-inch brass rod to make up some saw-nuts.

I still haven't got the sheoak thumb-hole handle cut out yet, although I have fixed my scrollsaw and modified the drill press to double as a drum sander to make the job easier.

Too many projects and so little time. How did I ever find time to go to work?

I'll have to get back into the workbench build when all this is over.

doug3030
15th Mar 2019, 06:19 PM
Since Matt recently reminded us that his sawhandle making day is only three weeks away, I thought I had better get a wriggle on.

Here's what I did today:

450875

Is it wrong to fall in love with a saw handle?

Bushmiller
15th Mar 2019, 06:32 PM
Is it wrong to fall in love with a saw handle?

It's fine providing it doesn't morph into an indecent obsession, but I don't wish to say any more on the subject. :wink: As it happens I now eagerly await the curves. Looking good.

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
15th Mar 2019, 06:34 PM
Since Matt recently reminded us that his sawhandle making day is only three weeks away, I thought I had better get a wriggle on.

Here's what I did today:

450875

Is it wrong to fall in love with a saw handle?


Doug,
Itís certainly not wrong to proud of ones own work,
With regards your being in love with soon to be born saw handle
I ainít going there [emoji849][emoji849][emoji849][emoji849]

Cheers Matt,

doug3030
15th Mar 2019, 06:37 PM
It's fine providing it doesn't morph into an indecent obsession,

I will do my best to ensure it does not develop into a paraphilia :rolleyes:

I hope to make some sexy sawnuts over the weekend so that I can take my mind off of the handle. :wink:

Simplicity
15th Mar 2019, 07:17 PM
Doug,
Now the big question because it is obvious you are developing a fondness for this particular piece of timber.

Now a saw handle,when is the tricky saw slot going in.
The pressure is now on especially since your now emotionally involved.


Cheers Matt,

doug3030
15th Mar 2019, 07:35 PM
... when is the tricky saw slot going in.
The pressure is now on especially since your now emotionally involved.

So far, Matt, all I have done is cut out the shape and sand the saw-marks off.

With that profile defined, I think it best to cut the kerf for the saw-plate and drill the holes for the sawnuts while the handle still has flat sides.

I believe it would be more difficult to do those tasks if the handle shaping took place first.

It is also probably a good idea to cut the kerf as early in the piece as possible as it is the step with the greatest risk of disaster.

I haven't decided what to use for cutting the kerf yet - I need to measure the sawplate and find something with a similar kerf.

Simplicity
15th Mar 2019, 07:54 PM
So far, Matt, all I have done is cut out the shape and sand the saw-marks off.

With that profile defined, I think it best to cut the kerf for the saw-plate and drill the holes for the sawnuts while the handle still has flat sides.

I believe it would be more difficult to do those tasks if the handle shaping took place first.

It is also probably a good idea to cut the kerf as early in the piece as possible as it is the step with the greatest risk of disaster.

I haven't decided what to use for cutting the kerf yet - I need to measure the sawplate and find something with a similar kerf.


Doug Doug,
My whole point your just at the hot lust stage of the dating thing.
I would do the saw slot if it was me right about Now.
If it all goes pear shape you havenít wasted a lot time on the saw handle.
You still get to shed a tear, but you ainít in the divorce court screaming your lungs out about all the effort you put into the love affair.

Iíve used a hacksaw blade in the past to start a slim saw slot.
That then can be opened up using the same saw plate you intend to use on the saw.(But with no set)

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
15th Mar 2019, 08:05 PM
My whole point your just at the hot lust stage of the dating thing.
I would do the saw slot if it was me right about Now.

If its all the same to you I will eat my dinner first, before it goes cold



That then can be opened up using the same saw plate you intend to use on the saw.(But with no set)

This is a rehandle job - saw is already set

Chris Parks
16th Mar 2019, 12:32 PM
Mat, I am out for this unfortunately, I really wanted to come down and say hello to everyone but it is not to be.

Bushmiller
16th Mar 2019, 12:33 PM
If its all the same to you I will eat my dinner first, before it goes cold



Ha, Ha. Sounds like a man going in to battle. Remember to have a squat first too! :wink:

Rob Streeper identified a good method to me of cutting the saw slot.

1. Mark your kerf with either fine pencil or better still use a marking gauge.
2. With a fine tooth saw without set, saw along the line only to the depth of the teeth. In practice this is probably no more than 2mm.
3. With a similar saw, but with the teeth set, deepen to, say 10mm.
4. Now you can use another saw to open up the kerf to suit the thickness of the plate and cut to the required depth.

The principle is that once you have a shallow kerf all around the slotted part of the handle it is much easier to avoid drifting off.

Since using Rob's method I have not had a failure as far as the saw slot goes (plenty of other disasters). The only drawback with this method is having a number of suitable saws. I have a couple of el cheapo gentlemen's saws I use for the first two steps above. A hacksaw blade as Matt has suggested might also work for opening up the kerf in step 2, but I am not sure how well it would track for the step 1 as it relies on a "wave" rather than "set."

Regards
Paul

doug3030
16th Mar 2019, 01:10 PM
Mat, I am out for this unfortunately, I really wanted to come down and say hello to everyone but it is not to be.

Pity you can't come and join the party Chris.


Rob Streeper identified a good method to me of cutting the saw slot.

...

The principle is that once you have a shallow kerf all around the slotted part of the handle it is much easier to avoid drifting off.

The sawplate is 1.1mm thick.

The blade on my 14 inch bandsaw cuts a kerf 1.1mm thick. I might try an experiment on a piece of the scrap I cut off the sawhandle. I will cut the kerf first with a japanese saw and see if the bandsaw will follow it nicely, against a high fence. The bandsaw is well tuned and can cut thin veneers accurately so I think it might be worth a go.

Simplicity
16th Mar 2019, 01:27 PM
Mat, I am out for this unfortunately, I really wanted to come down and say hello to everyone but it is not to be.

Chris,
Thanks for letting us know, itís a shame you canít make it.
But we understand, itís quite a drive for a one day event.

Cheers Matt,

doug3030
21st Mar 2019, 04:33 PM
In preparation for Matt's weekend, I had a workshop visit today from Benny

Benny came over for a bit of a hand with getting a handle blank started and to make some sawnuts on my metal lathe.

We discussed a few aspects of timber selection for saw handles and used one of the templates from Blackburn tools' website to mark out a handle from some Banksia Benny brought with him.

We had time to talk our way through the lathe work for one saw-nut, with a bit of finishing work to still be done, hopefully next week.

It was a pleasure to have Benny in the shed for the day. He is a young man who is keen to learn, respectful of the equipment and a pleasure to teach. I really enjoyed the day. :2tsup:

Here are some pictures of the day in progress. Benny is the personification of concentration.

451195
451196
451197

Simplicity
23rd Mar 2019, 08:25 PM
Doug/Benn


That looks like a great day of activity.
Well done to you both .
I must apologise for my lack of attention here lately, just a bit going on in my world away from the forum.

But I am very much looking forward to the day which is just around the corner now.

Cheers Matt.

doug3030
23rd Mar 2019, 08:37 PM
Doug/Benn


That looks like a great day of activity.
Well done to you both .

It was an absolute pleasure helping Benny spread his woodworking wings a bit wider.

I was hoping he would post a photo or two of his saw handle in progress. It really is well done.

Benny, have you worked out yet when you are coming back to finish the preparations for Matt's day?

Benny_
24th Mar 2019, 03:35 PM
It was an absolute pleasure helping Benny spread his woodworking wings a bit wider.

I was hoping he would post a photo or two of his saw handle in progress. It really is well done.

Benny, have you worked out yet when you are coming back to finish the preparations for Matt's day?

Thanks a lot, I had a lot of fun as well.

I have been pretty busy recently so forgot to post photos. Went straight out of my head after Thursday! Here are the photos of the saw handle, + my first item of metal turning (saw nut). The wood is banksia serrata.

I think Thursday this week at the same time would work fine.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190324/fc72423264546228f1d04cd6c83e1389.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190324/e03e78ebeb705fb20eb85329b3ca02f5.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190324/2429d6cbc2c26c88c65d1269d3b0d06c.jpg

Bushmiller
24th Mar 2019, 04:27 PM
Benny

My conscience says I should warn you of the slippery road to hand saw addiction.

But I'm not going to. :)

Nice saw handle and timber. :cool:

Regards
Paul

doug3030
24th Mar 2019, 06:38 PM
Benny

My conscience says I should warn you of the slippery road to hand saw addiction.

But I'm not going to. :)

Too late Paul, the bug has bitten him. His eyes glaze over and he hyperventilates when he sees all of my "works in progress". I have to keep them out of sight when he is in the shed. :rolleyes:

But hey that is a good thing. :2tsup:

doug3030
28th Mar 2019, 04:45 PM
Nine days out from Matts GTG and Benny is back in my shed honing his skills.

After a quick refresher on how to make sawnuts on the lathe, I left him to it and sat at my bench and worked on some of my own projects.

While Benny was making sawnuts with very little input from me, I was working on my solar power system ready for Easter camping.

451564

Once the lathe work was done I showed him a jig I made for squaring up the shank on the milling machine. Real easy to use.

451565

Benny got the slot cut in his handle for the sawplate using one of my Japanese saws and managed it very well.

451566


And after I had finished my solar power work I cut the sawplate slot in the thumbhole rip saw handle :cool:

451567

A great day and lots of learning and skill building took place for both of us.

Looking forward to the GTG

Bushmiller
28th Mar 2019, 04:58 PM
Well done both of you. I would really love to come along to Matt's GTG.

There are only two things stopping me: I am 1493.2Km away and secondly I will be at work. Other than that.....

Regards
Paul

doug3030
28th Mar 2019, 05:00 PM
There are only two things stopping me: I am 1493.2Km away and secondly I will be at work. Other than that.....

Pretty lame excuses really, Paul when you think about it. :rolleyes:

Seriously I am sure you will be with us in spirit. We will miss your expert input though.

Bushmiller
28th Mar 2019, 07:19 PM
Seriously I am sure you will be with us in spirit.

Yes I will.

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
28th Mar 2019, 09:27 PM
Well done both of you. I would really love to come along to Matt's GTG.

There are only two things stopping me: I am 1493.2Km away and secondly I will be at work. Other than that.....

Regards
Paul

Paul,

If it would help, I can call the power plant and tell them you lied on your CV.
Would that help?

Cheers Matt,

Simplicity
28th Mar 2019, 09:31 PM
I feel like a complete slacker here not promoting this.
But in all fairness I think Iím just providing catering next weekend.
Seeing how expertly these two gentlemen(Benny and Doug)are going.
I know I will be just shadowing there awesomeness.

Absolutely top stuff guys.[emoji106][emoji106][emoji106][emoji106]

Cheers Matt.

Bushmiller
29th Mar 2019, 12:37 PM
Paul,

If it would help, I can call the power plant and tell them you lied on your CV.
Would that help?

Cheers Matt,

Right at this moment that would not help much. You will still be 1493.2Km away!

:rolleyes:

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
29th Mar 2019, 04:20 PM
Right at this moment that would not help much. You will still be 1493.2Km away!

:-)

Regards
Paul

Paul,
To be perfectly frank and honest your negative fives are really not needed.
Iím feeling the glass is being viewed half empty.
1493.2 km will only take effort on the first step the rest will follow.
Just smell the flowers and drift on down man.
[emoji6][emoji6][emoji6][emoji41]

Cheers Matt.
Currently keeping an eye on a bushfire 12 km away[emoji849].

Bushmiller
29th Mar 2019, 07:28 PM
Matt

Was that negative vibes? If so, I am humbled and cringe before you, but on the subject of vibes, if you have not seen the film "Kelly's Heroes" you really should. Starring a whole host of cult actors, the hippy tank commander, played by a hirsute and goggled Donald Sutherland, probably steals the show and may have been the first human to utter the phrase "negative vibes." Or was it Dylan off the "Magic Roundabout?"

Regards
Paul

Simplicity
29th Mar 2019, 08:15 PM
Matt

Was that negative vibes? If so, I am humbled and cringe before you, but on the subject of vibes, if you have not seen the film "Kelly's Heroes" you really should. Starring a whole host of cult actors, the hippy tank commander, played by a hirsute and goggled Donald Sutherland, probably steals the show and may have been the first human to utter the phrase "negative vibes." Or was it Dylan off the "Magic Roundabout?"

Regards
Paul

I have an its brilliant absolutely brilliant.
What could be more delightful then driving a Sherman tank through Europe listening to classical music.
On a bad PA system lol

Cheers Matt,

Bushmiller
29th Mar 2019, 08:25 PM
I have an its brilliant absolutely brilliant.
What could be more delightful then driving a Sherman tank through Europe listening to classical music.
On a bad PA system lol

Cheers Matt,

And shooting psychedelic paint instead of shells. My memory is that the tank itself it had enhanced performance so they could escape conflict and in particular it reversed very impressively. It is actually the only film I deliberately went to see twice at the cinema. Just think what Sergeant Oddball could have done if he had had access to bluetooth technology. :cool:

Regards
Paul