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chatometry
22nd May 2022, 11:20 PM
Hi everyone
This is Paolo, from the PZC Chatometry – A standard system to measure wood chatoyance (http://www.chatometry.com) team.
I just wanted to share something about what we've been doing last years. Basically, we identified a reliable method to measure wood chatoyance, which is the way many wood species shift their color depending on the lighting direction.
This is a common example (all pictures show wood sanded to 1500-grit with no finish):

Eucalyptus – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/eucalyptus/)

Now the useful info: we put together a summary table based on thousands of samples, showing the typical chatoyance value of many wood species - here:
Summary Table – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/woods/)
Each wood can be clicked to reach its specific page, which shows some example of chatoyance on that wood.

I hope these data can actually help some of you :)
Paolo

NeilS
25th May 2022, 08:17 PM
Many thanks Paolo.

Excellent work on Chatoyance measurements and the website on your results.

I mostly work (woodturn) with our Australian Blackwood (Acacia Melanoxoylon) and I know from experience the striking chatoyance it exhibits, so I looked that up and, yes, it is way up there at the top of your species list... :)

For those who are not familiar with the term... it comes from French, "il de chat", cat's eye.

chatometry
26th May 2022, 03:01 AM
Yes, indeed.
You can see an example in this page:
Acacia (misc) – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/acacia-misc/)

Unfortunately it is not cheap to purchase it from here. We would need at least 4 more samples (each coming from a different individual tree) to create a dedicated page and typical value for Acacia Melanoxylon.
Is it common in Australia?

Fekit
26th May 2022, 08:12 AM
Is it common in Australia?

Yes, it is, and it is widespread from, Far North Queensland to Tasmania, so effectively the entire eastern coast of Australia.

Acacia melanoxylon (https://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/acacia_melanoxylon.htm)

It also varies significantly in appearance across that geographic distribution.

What sample size pieces do you use?

chatometry
26th May 2022, 08:40 AM
Thank you, very interesting. I heard there are some trees in Italy too, but still I couldn't find any pieces.

Anything that is at least 120x38x0.6mm (so even just a little piece of veneer) works for us, except for end-grain cutoffs. Even small firewood pieces can be turned into samples, provided a 120x38mm piece can fit inside. The tricky part is finding pieces from different individual trees (or from different sources).

Fekit
26th May 2022, 08:55 AM
Well, at that size and really negligible weight I'd be happy to send over a couple of pieces. If they get past customs at your end, all well and good if not, well you get that.

I have some melenoxylon from Cardwell in North Queensland. Where do I send it?

BobL
26th May 2022, 09:35 AM
Well, at that size and really negligible weight I'd be happy to send over a couple of pieces. If they get past customs at your end, all well and good if not, well you get that.

I have some melenoxylon from Cardwell in North Queensland. Where do I send it?

Wood will usually easily make it through customs as long as it doesn't have any bark or evidence of bugs. Most countries won't blink an eyeat wood but I was surprised at how much interest a canadian customs officer took in the pieces I had brought from Australia to Canada. They were inspected with a head magnifier and the inspector wanted to know all aennout them - turned out he was a woodie.

NeilS
26th May 2022, 03:32 PM
Yes, indeed.
You can see an example in this page:
Acacia (misc) – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/acacia-misc/)

Unfortunately it is not cheap to purchase it from here. We would need at least 4 more samples (each coming from a different individual tree) to create a dedicated page and typical value for Acacia Melanoxylon.
Is it common in Australia?

It's common here in South Australia, but it's not a big tree so supply isn't plentiful. The primary demand for it is as a cabinet timber and for turning.

The amount of chatoyance varies greatly as does the colour. Where I live in the Adelaide Hills it can be a deep rich colour like the sample on your website, with quite spectacular chatoyance, especially on large platters.

It also grows on the sandy soils in the south east of our state and that can be very pale.

IME, it is not obvious what the chatoyance will be like on any one piece until you have fine sanded it, which allows you to then see into any reflective cell structure.

Log Dog
26th May 2022, 08:45 PM
Acacia Celsa rivals Blackwood for Chatoyance
Flindersia Brayleyana too!
Log Dog :)

Fekit
26th May 2022, 08:52 PM
I'm happy to be corrected, but are you not talking about figure as opposed to chatoyance? I have some fairly run of the mill timbers with respect to figure in the grain, however, the chatoyance is stunning.

Log Dog
26th May 2022, 09:02 PM
I'm happy to be corrected, but are you not talking about figure as opposed to chatoyance? I have some fairly run of the mill timbers with respect to figure in the grain, however, the chatoyance is stunning.
LOL no I'm talking chatoyance Feckit
Highly figured(particularly fiddleback) wood will often generate the most wonderful chatoyance.
Log Dog :)

Old Croc
26th May 2022, 09:52 PM
LOL no I'm talking chatoyance Feckit
Highly figured(particularly fiddleback) wood will often generate the most wonderful chatoyance.
Log Dog :)
Wow, this is getting confusing. I just call it fiddle back and any other pattern just figured.
Whatever floats your boat.
Rgds,
Crocy.

Log Dog
26th May 2022, 10:11 PM
Fiddleback grain will often display a 3D appearance that changes when viewed at different angles
This is known as wood chatoyance
Log Dog :)

Camelot
26th May 2022, 10:15 PM
Tigers Eye

Log Dog
26th May 2022, 10:23 PM
Tigers EyeWhen referring to jewellery
Log Dog :)

Camelot
26th May 2022, 11:56 PM
When referring to jewellery
Log Dog :)

"chatoyer" = shine like a cats eye and a Tiger is just a big cat, so yes the name was given to a semi-precious stone, however it just really means the wood as the ability to change its appearance depending on the viewing angle due to how the light hits the surface.

chatometry
27th May 2022, 12:10 AM
Well, at that size and really negligible weight I'd be happy to send over a couple of pieces. If they get past customs at your end, all well and good if not, well you get that.

I have some melenoxylon from Cardwell in North Queensland. Where do I send it?

This would be AWESOME!!!
I will send a private message.
Thanks
Paolo

chatometry
27th May 2022, 05:18 AM
This would be AWESOME!!!
I will send a private message.
Thanks
Paolo

I sent a private message, but it does not appear in the sent messages... I hope @Fekit got it.

chatometry
27th May 2022, 05:24 AM
Acacia Celsa rivals Blackwood for Chatoyance
Flindersia Brayleyana too!
Log Dog :)

Can they also rival the current n.1 (acacia koa)?

We tested about 100 species, out of thousands and thousands out there, so statistically there has to be something exceeding koa...!

chatometry
27th May 2022, 05:54 AM
Technically, chatoyance is a microscopic property that causes light to be reflected in a way that depends from fiber orientation (anisotropic reflection). Curl is caused by a wavy distribution of fibers, so fibers have different directions in different positions on the surface. This, combined with anisotropic reflection, yield the amazing "curly" look we all know. This page shows some examples
Curl PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/what-is-wood-chatoyance/curl/)

This page shows some other figures:
Other Figures PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/what-is-wood-chatoyance/other-figures/)

An extreme example is found in flecks, where fibers are perpendicular to main fibers, and so they are 90 out of phase in the anisotropic reflection cycle. A good example is this...
Hi-res chatoyance / chatoyancy on unfinished Louro Faia wood veneer - YouTube (https://youtu.be/uhMFizwqzDA)

Paolo

Log Dog
27th May 2022, 08:00 AM
Can they also rival the current n.1 (acacia koa)?

We tested about 100 species, out of thousands and thousands out there, so statistically there has to be something exceeding koa...!They eat Koa for breakfast LOL
Log Dog :)

Fekit
27th May 2022, 09:16 AM
Hey Paolo

Mate I've just had a look at that youtube video. It might be worth your time to have a look at the following thread of mine.

Silky Medullary Madness (https://www.woodworkforums.com/f222/silky-medullary-madness-247159)

Log Dog
27th May 2022, 09:28 AM
We tested about 100 species, out of thousands and thousands out there, so statistically there has to be something exceeding koa...! Yes I believe that certainly their are species out there that rival Koa
Don't get me wrong...Koa is stunning
However here in OZ we have nearly 1000 species of Acacia
Many yield beautifully figured wood
Also we have a number of rainforest species that also yield wonderful wood
Qld Maple,Maple Silkwod,Black Walnut,Miva Mahogany,Silky Oak etc
And then there's nearly 1000 odd species of Eucalypts
Again many of them delivering the most wonderful figure
We are very fortunate to have such an abundance to choose from
I haven't mentioned some of the other obscure species that occur throughout the outback
Montana,Conkerberry and the like!
You obviously love wood...I applaud you for that
I implore you to dig deeper and investigate some of the species that I have mentioned
I can say with great confidence that they will rival any other species elsewhere on the planet for beauty and of course,chatoyance
Happy to send you some samples to
Keep up the good work old mate
Log Dog :)

BobL
27th May 2022, 09:56 AM
Can they also rival the current n.1 (acacia koa)?

We tested about 100 species, out of thousands and thousands out there, so statistically there has to be something exceeding koa...!

There are over 800 known species of Eucalyptus alone. By comparison, "Pinus" is spread world wide but only has 111.

Something that might be worth knowing is how chatoyance changes in time. I say this because I believe a wood's true visual character can only really be observed after it it is freshly milled. No amount of sanding or polishing even with the finest grits can ever really capture its true colour and reflectance etc. When I mill something I can often see it changing rapidly afterwards even in just a few minutes (mainly colour) but also reflectance. I realize this has no practical value but it may be something that contributes to the actual values of chatoyance you measure.

NeilS
27th May 2022, 02:26 PM
Acacia Celsa rivals Blackwood for Chatoyance
Flindersia Brayleyana too!
Log Dog :)

Yes, LD, Qld Maple (Flindersia brayleyana) is also way up there. Here is a nice examples of one piece that I turned...


512287

Wrongly or rightly, I don't expect to see that amount if figure in some wood without chatoyance, but often see wood with chatoyance that has no figure.

On the difference between figure and chatoyance, according to Paolos' s Chatoyance website...


Chatoyance is often highlighted by figure; however, chatoyance can be considered as a property of the material, while figure is related to the specific piece of wood under analysis. Figure creates contrast patterns which make chatoyance much more evident; yet if there is no chatoyance, the figure wont show.

It's the irregular wood grain in a piece of wood that presents the fibres in different orientations that allows for the variations in light reflection.

Chatoyance gives the illusion of being able to see below the surface of the wood, which highlights some figure patterns, like quilting.

However, many patterns that we call figure don't depend on this illusion and are simply the result of the grain pattern that is exposed on the finished surface, like the mendullary rays in oaks.

I'll leave you wood specialists to sort us out if you think we are wrong about any of this...:U

Log Dog
27th May 2022, 02:35 PM
Yes, LD, Qld Maple (Flindersia brayleyana) is also way up there. Here is a nice examples of one piece that I turned...


512287

Wrongly or rightly, I don't expect to see that amount if figure in some wood without chatoyance, but often see wood with chatoyance that has no figure.

On the difference between figure and chatoyance, according to Paolos' s Chatoyance website...



It's the irregular wood grain in a piece of wood that presents the fibres in different orientations that allows for the variations in light reflection.

Chatoyance gives the illusion of being able to see below the surface of the wood, which highlights some figure patterns, like quilting.

However, many patterns that we call figure don't depend on this illusion and are simply the result of the grain pattern that is exposed on the finished surface, like the mendullary rays in oaks.

I'll leave you wood specialists to sort us out if you think we are wrong about any of this...:U


Wonderful piece of Qld Maple
Beautifully crafted I.must say!
Worth noting that it is quartersawn too
Perhaps another variable that enhances chatoyance
Log Dog :)

Fekit
27th May 2022, 03:35 PM
I also see the fundamental structure of it all over the place too. Take the following for example.

512292

I'm not actually certain what this wood is apart from being non-ferrous. Anyway, as you can see there is figuring & chatoyance in this piece, but what many people would have not realised before is that this forms as an actual physical character within the structure of the tree, that piece you see feels as rippled as it looks.

I have also noticed over the years that this can emanate all the way to the exterior of some trees.

chatometry
28th May 2022, 02:02 AM
Yes I believe that certainly their are species out there that rival Koa
Don't get me wrong...Koa is stunning
However here in OZ we have nearly 1000 species of Acacia
Many yield beautifully figured wood
Also we have a number of rainforest species that also yield wonderful wood
Qld Maple,Maple Silkwod,Black Walnut,Miva Mahony,Silky Oak etc
And then there's nearly 1000 odd species of Eucalypts
Again many of them delivering the most wonderful figure
We are very fortunate to have such an abundance to choose from
I haven't mentioned some of the other obscure species that occur throughout the outback
Montana,Conkerberry and the like!
You obviously love wood...I applaud you for that
I implore you to dig deeper and investigate some of the species that I have mentioned
I can say with great confidence that they will rival any other species elsewhere on the planet for beauty and of course,chatoyance
Happy to send you some samples to
Keep up the good work old mate
Log Dog :)

My issue is exactly in finding samples, because many of these wood species you mentioned are just not available here. Would you really be up for supporting with samples?
This would be awesome.
If we want to cover some Australian species with some statistic significance, we need samples from different logs within the same specie (or group of species), so help from other people would really really be helpful!

chatometry
28th May 2022, 02:10 AM
So true. We did a few tests about sunlight effect on chatoyance:

Sunlight exposure on purpleheart – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/case-studies/sunlight-weather/sunlight-exposure-purpleheart/)

Sunlight exposure on field maple – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/case-studies/sunlight-weather/sunlight-exposure-on-field-maple/)

UV light exposure – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/uv-light-exposure/)

In fact, EVERYTHING affects chatoyance...

chatometry
28th May 2022, 02:11 AM
Yes, LD, Qld Maple (Flindersia brayleyana) is also way up there. Here is a nice examples of one piece that I turned...


512287

Wrongly or rightly, I don't expect to see that amount if figure in some wood without chatoyance, but often see wood with chatoyance that has no figure.

On the difference between figure and chatoyance, according to Paolos' s Chatoyance website...



It's the irregular wood grain in a piece of wood that presents the fibres in different orientations that allows for the variations in light reflection.

Chatoyance gives the illusion of being able to see below the surface of the wood, which highlights some figure patterns, like quilting.

However, many patterns that we call figure don't depend on this illusion and are simply the result of the grain pattern that is exposed on the finished surface, like the mendullary rays in oaks.

I'll leave you wood specialists to sort us out if you think we are wrong about any of this...:U




Beautiful piece!!!!

NeilS
28th May 2022, 10:50 AM
So true. We did a few tests about sunlight effect on chatoyance:

Sunlight exposure on purpleheart PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/case-studies/sunlight-weather/sunlight-exposure-purpleheart/)

Sunlight exposure on field maple PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/case-studies/sunlight-weather/sunlight-exposure-on-field-maple/)

UV light exposure PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/uv-light-exposure/)

In fact, EVERYTHING affects chatoyance...

Those tests gave some interesting results, Chatometry.

I was also interested in your test results on progressively sanding to finer grits

Progressive grit sanding PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/progressive-grit-sanding/)

I mostly sand to #400 and your results show on at least one species a drop in chatoyance between #320 and #600, so I may not be hitting a sweet spot above #600.

The affect of different finishes on at least one species is also interesting...

Finishing Curly Maple PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/finishing-curly-maple/)

chatometry
29th May 2022, 12:19 AM
Thanks Neil

I've been discussing with some people about this drop in chatoyance during the progressive grit sanding test, and we came to this conclusion: it was due to the fact that the 320-grit disc we used was a partly worn one, thus giving an even smoother surface than the 600-grit disc (which was new). So I believe that, in general, a higher grit always yields a higher chatoyance, and a worn disc corresponds to a higher grit new disc.
However, some more tests of this kind are planned.

Take a look at this set of tests:
Surface preparation on Curly Maple – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/surface-preparation-on-curly-maple/)
We showed that (at least on curly maple finished with BLO or shellac) sanding to a higher grit provides better chatoyance on the finished product. No sanding at all gives even better results (at least on this curly maple veneer).
We plan to check if the common knowledge "a good planing is better than any sanding" is true.

yvan
29th May 2022, 09:46 AM
This timber was purchased dressed 40 years ago and kept under our house for 30 of them before being turned into a mantlepiece.

Cheers,
Yvan

PS Apologies for the pic's orientation...most irritating!

Mobyturns
29th May 2022, 09:59 AM
...we came to this conclusion: it was due to the fact that the 320-grit disc we used was a partly worn one, thus giving an even smoother surface than the 600-grit disc (which was new). So I believe that, in general, a higher grit always yields a higher chatoyance, and a worn disc corresponds to a higher grit new disc.
However, some more tests of this kind are planned. ....

Perhaps it has more to do with a worn sandpaper disc burnishing the surface rather than sanding. The worn grits will sand to some extent however the filled pores between the grits or the matrix will burnish the surface.

Thank you for sharing this very interesting research.

NeilS
29th May 2022, 10:30 AM
This timber was purchased dressed 40 years ago and kept under our house for 30 of them before being turned into a mantlepiece.

Cheers,
Yvan

PS Apologies for the pic's orientation...most irritating!

If it changes in appearance (colour, tone, optical movement) as you walk past it then that is chatoyance. If it remains static I would just call it figure.

Nice bit of wood, either way!

NeilS
29th May 2022, 11:50 AM
Take a look at this set of tests:
Surface preparation on Curly Maple – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/surface-preparation-on-curly-maple/)
We showed that (at least on curly maple finished with BLO or shellac) sanding to a higher grit provides better chatoyance on the finished product. No sanding at all gives even better results (at least on this curly maple veneer).

We plan to check if the common knowledge "a good planing is better than any sanding" is true.

Traditional Japanese carpenters definitely favour a sharp finely tuned plane finish as do many western wood workers.

A point of clarification... were any interim grits used in that Curly Maple test between #240 and #1500, as you did in the 'Progressive grit sanding' test?

Your 'Progressive grit sanding' test results were very instructive, but that was without adding a finish at any grit point. If you did use interim grits between #240 and #1500 in your Curly Maple surface preparation test that helps to partly answer a question about adding a finish to pieces that are sanded above #240.

chatometry
30th May 2022, 08:46 AM
This timber was purchased dressed 40 years ago and kept under our house for 30 of them before being turned into a mantlepiece.

Cheers,
Yvan

PS Apologies for the pic's orientation...most irritating!

Nice piece! Do you know what wood it is?

chatometry
30th May 2022, 08:52 AM
Traditional Japanese carpenters definitely favour a sharp finely tuned plane finish as do many western wood workers.

A point of clarification... were any interim grits used in that Curly Maple test between #240 and #1500, as you did in the 'Progressive grit sanding' test?

Your 'Progressive grit sanding' test results were very instructive, but that was without adding a finish at any grit point. If you did use interim grits between #240 and #1500 in your Curly Maple surface preparation test that helps to partly answer a question about adding a finish to pieces that are sanded above #240.

Yes, interim grits were used to reach the final 1500-grit.
However, no interim finish was applied.

I know that a better technique involves sanding, then finishing, then finer sanding, and so on. This could be an objective for the next test.
Would you suggest a specific recipe?
Proposal:
Sanding to 240
Medium shellac
Sanding to 400
Medium shellac
Sanding to 1500
Dense shellac (as many coats as required to achieve chatoyance stabilization)
?

Thanks
Paolo

yvan
30th May 2022, 08:55 AM
Nice piece! Do you know what wood it is?

Oops, I should have mentioned it: myrtle

NeilS
31st May 2022, 08:55 AM
Proposal:
Sanding to 240
Medium shellac
Sanding to 400
Medium shellac
Sanding to 1500
Dense shellac (as many coats as required to achieve chatoyance stabilization)
?



Yes, Paolo, that would fill in the missing data point between #240 and #1500.

The practical benefit of that is that most craft woodturners go higher than #240 and few go as high as #1500. Somewhere between #360 and #600 is where most turners stop, but if there is a proven benefit of going higher with a particularly chatoyanced piece of wood then some of us might add the additional higher grits to our sanding procedure.

chatometry
31st May 2022, 09:07 PM
Thanks Neil
I will run this test.

Paolo

Log Dog
20th June 2022, 10:10 PM
Happy to send you some samples of Acacia Celsa
I took this pic in torchlight to try and capture any chatoyance
The grain has 'lit up'
Log Dog :)

chatometry
22nd June 2022, 07:11 PM
Happy to send you some samples of Acacia Celsa
I took this pic in torchlight to try and capture any chatoyance
The grain has 'lit up'
Log Dog :)

Amazing. Acacia seems to be the most promising genus, and those species that yield brownish wood should be the best. However, it might be worth trying to dye one of the lighter ones and see what happens...

chatometry
23rd June 2022, 04:07 AM
Yes, Paolo, that would fill in the missing data point between #240 and #1500.

The practical benefit of that is that most craft woodturners go higher than #240 and few go as high as #1500. Somewhere between #360 and #600 is where most turners stop, but if there is a proven benefit of going higher with a particularly chatoyanced piece of wood then some of us might add the additional higher grits to our sanding procedure.

...eventually, test done!
The results are shown here:

Incremental grit and finishing on Curly Maple – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/incremental-grit-and-finishing-on-curly-maple/)

It appears that sanding to a higher grit generally provides better results, although going above #800 is not always useful.

Honestly, this is just one test campaign on one wood species with just one finish, plus it was made on veneer, so I cannot really generalize the results to other wood species with other finishes in solid form. Still, in such a complex world, I would sand my crafts to a high grit either before or during finishing, at least where easy (flat surfaces and turned surfaces).

I hope this helps, and any suggestions for further testing are welcome.

Paolo

NeilS
23rd June 2022, 11:42 AM
...eventually, test done!
The results are shown here:

Incremental grit and finishing on Curly Maple – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/incremental-grit-and-finishing-on-curly-maple/)

It appears that sanding to a higher grit generally provides better results, although going above #800 is not always useful.

...

I hope this helps, and any suggestions for further testing are welcome.

Paolo

Yes, very useful Paolo.

Many thanks

chatometry
19th September 2022, 05:50 AM
Many thanks Paolo.

Excellent work on Chatoyance measurements and the website on your results.

I mostly work (woodturn) with our Australian Blackwood (Acacia Melanoxoylon) and I know from experience the striking chatoyance it exhibits, so I looked that up and, yes, it is way up there at the top of your species list... :)

For those who are not familiar with the term... it comes from French, "il de chat", cat's eye.

You will be happy to hear that our current most chatoyant sample [by far, among about 2000 samples] is an acacia melanoxylon sample with over 35 PZC :)

NeilS
19th September 2022, 09:49 AM
You will be happy to hear that our current most chatoyant sample [by far, among about 2000 samples] is an acacia melanoxylon sample with over 35 PZC :)

Yes, very happy to hear that your test results have confirmed that.

I put my hand up to send you samples of some of our other woods, but workshop time has been taken up with back orders for the gallery, so I didn't make it in time to add to the other samples that are on their way to you.

Thanks for the update Paolo.

Regards

Log Dog
20th September 2022, 10:31 PM
Will get some of Acacia Celsa to you as soon as I can get into my container...it is very full at present :C:B

Log Dog :)

chatometry
21st September 2022, 02:54 AM
Yes, very happy to hear that your test results have confirmed that.

I put my hand up to send you samples of some of our other woods, but workshop time has been taken up with back orders for the gallery, so I didn't make it in time to add to the other samples that are on their way to you.

Thanks for the update Paolo.

Regards

Thanks Neil
So I understand you shipped some samples to "Clear Out", am I right?
Paolo

PS soon we'll be able to share some more results about fine sanding!

chatometry
21st September 2022, 02:56 AM
Will get some of Acacia Celsa to you as soon as I can get into my container...it is very full at present :C:B

Log Dog :)

What an awesome curl!
We still have no Acacia Celsa samples at all, so yours would be very appreciated!
Paolo

Log Dog
22nd September 2022, 12:09 AM
Paolo
These would light up a Christmas tree :q

Log Dog :)

chatometry
22nd September 2022, 07:35 AM
Is it still Acacia Celsa?

Log Dog
22nd September 2022, 08:06 AM
Is it still Acacia Celsa?Yes it is Paolo

Log Dog :)

NeilS
22nd September 2022, 09:59 AM
Thanks Neil
So I understand you shipped some samples to "Clear Out", am I right?
Paolo



No, unfortunately, I haven't been able to fit in the time to put my samples together and to get them away to Clear Out or directly to you. Still a bit away off at this stage.

chatometry
22nd September 2022, 10:05 PM
No problem at all... I am still thinking and worrying about the endless list of Acacias that live on your continent!

Log Dog
23rd September 2022, 12:13 AM
No problem at all... I am still thinking and worrying about the endless list of Acacias that live on your continent!Around 1000 species occur in the Great Southern Land Paolo

What a rich genus Acacia is...with many species here producing the most delightful timber.

Have milled some breathtakingly beautiful Melanoxylon in the past however Celsa is my favourite for figure and colour

As a standing tree it is imposing too

For those that love wood...we are the 'lucky country'

Here's some Melanoxylon the I milled some moons ago

Log Dog :)

chatometry
23rd September 2022, 06:50 AM
And what did you do with that beautiful piece of blackwood? I am curious about the final result!
Paolo

Log Dog
23rd September 2022, 08:39 AM
And what did you do with that beautiful piece of blackwood? I am curious about the final result!
PaoloAccoustic guitar Paolo

Log Dog :)

chatometry
24th September 2022, 06:46 AM
Must be a first class guitar. Nice piece!
Thanks for the info.
Paolo

Log Dog
25th September 2022, 01:14 PM
Paolo
Some wonderful chatoyance in this piece of Qld Maple

Most figured Qld Maple that I have ever milled :q

Log Dog :)

chatometry
25th September 2022, 08:52 PM
Just added a post about ultra-fine sanding on the finishing section

chatometry
27th October 2022, 08:12 PM
Yes, very happy to hear that your test results have confirmed that.

I put my hand up to send you samples of some of our other woods, but workshop time has been taken up with back orders for the gallery, so I didn't make it in time to add to the other samples that are on their way to you.

Thanks for the update Paolo.

Regards

Here we are! Blackwood is officially, by far, the most chatoyant of all mapped species!
See
Australian Blackwood – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/australian-blackwood/)

chatometry
27th October 2022, 08:20 PM
Acacia Celsa rivals Blackwood for Chatoyance
Flindersia Brayleyana too!
Log Dog :)

In fact, we also got very high results from Flindersia Brayleyana: it turned out to be n. 4 after Blackwood, Koa and Bintangor.
See Maple, Queensland – PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/maple-queensland/)

As for Acacia Celsa, you will have to provide some samples to prove your theory! :D

Paolo

Log Dog
27th October 2022, 08:42 PM
In fact, we also got very high results from Flindersia Brayleyana: it turned out to be n. 4 after Blackwood, Koa and Bintangor.
See Maple, Queensland PZC Chatometry (https://www.chatometry.com/maple-queensland/)

As for Acacia Celsa, you will have to provide some samples to prove your theory! :D

PaoloYes Paolo...I need to get organised and get you some samples :B

Where and whom do I send them to?

Log Dog :)

chatometry
27th October 2022, 11:49 PM
PM sent :2tsup: