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View Full Version : No more sharpening chisels :-)



SawDustSniffer
14th Nov 2006, 02:16 PM
I have recently purchased a "mixed lot" 60 peaces of carbide inserts off ebay US$20 , and attached a few to the ends off 10mm dia steel rod with a tapped screw , and a peace of 1mm cork between .i use a 300mm Jarra handle with a chuck mounted in the end to hold the 10mmDia chisel bits .

Thay cut timber very well and you will never have to sharpen them ,
( there made for cutting HighSpeedSteel )
I now use them for rough shaping on my wood lath and save my sharp chisels for finishing , it's such a time saver i thought i should tell you guys ,
Ive made 40 drumb sticks out of iron bark , 25mm Dia 400mm long , and the tips of the "carbide inserts " still look mint (ive had them so hot ,smoke came out of the saw dust when i put it down )

look for rombus shapes <> 3 chisel shapes in 1 , 1 sharp point , pointing left & pointing right

Cliff Rogers
14th Nov 2006, 02:22 PM
G'day SDS, welcome aboard.

Do you have any photos?

TTIT
14th Nov 2006, 08:50 PM
I like the idea Sniffer, especially for some of the timber I use, but the bolt head looks like it would stop the shavings clearing the tool - how do they go in that respect? :confused:

ss_11000
14th Nov 2006, 09:11 PM
sounds like a brilliant idea. any chance of a video being made up ( see the ww forums videos thread )

cheers

joe greiner
14th Nov 2006, 11:32 PM
Great idea, SawDust. US$20 for 60 is a jolly good price. Generally > US$2 each from Grizzly, ENCO, etc.

Insert holders for metal lathes generally have a ledge to position the insert. Do you find bolt grip is sufficient for wood cutting? Also, please clarify function of your cork spacer.

JG

SawDustSniffer
14th Nov 2006, 11:52 PM
i would have to set up my web cam next to my lath for video , the bolt through the eye of the carbide tip was the easyest way i thought of fixing them at the time , cince i hammerd the steal flat on an anvil and sanded the hammer makes out with a belt sander ,the cork mat was to take up any uneven area's of the seat , now i have used them and found that thay dont ware out ,the next one's i make i will solder them on with an oxy and silver solder ,
i have had saw dust between the cutting tip and timber work , a quick wipe with my thumb clears it , burnt my self once ( hot tip ) but soldering should fix that miner problem

woodturn.com.au
16th Nov 2006, 06:46 PM
I have recently purchased a "mixed lot" 60 peaces of carbide inserts off ebay US$20 , and attached a few to the ends off 10mm dia steel rod with a tapped screw , and a peace of 1mm cork between .i use a 300mm Jarra handle with a chuck mounted in the end to hold the 10mmDia chisel bits .

Thay cut timber very well and you will never have to sharpen them ,
( there made for cutting HighSpeedSteel )
I now use them for rough shaping on my wood lath and save my sharp chisels for finishing , it's such a time saver i thought i should tell you guys ,
Ive made 40 drumb sticks out of iron bark , 25mm Dia 400mm long , and the tips of the "carbide inserts " still look mint (ive had them so hot ,smoke came out of the saw dust when i put it down )

look for rombus shapes <> 3 chisel shapes in 1 , 1 sharp point , pointing left & pointing right

Might have to give that a go ourselves....not a bad idea

SawDustSniffer
16th Nov 2006, 07:13 PM
So other people can try them and give there feed back
i will give one made up bit to the next 3 people that type " I'LL HAVE ONE" below
and Care/of post office address
in Australia only
I will make the 10mm dia rod as long as a A4 evelope
you can cut it down and make a handle

Wood Butcher
16th Nov 2006, 07:21 PM
So other people can try them and give there feed back
i will give one made up bit to the next 3 people that type " I'LL HAVE ONE" below
and Care/of post office address
in Australia only
I will make the 10mm dia rod as long as a A4 evelope
you can cut it down and make a handle

" I'LL HAVE ONE" :D
(but if you don't mid I'll pm you my address)

I am interested in seeing what they are like to use in schools. Anything that may help students is a boon to me!
(wouldn't mind finding out where you can get those tips from too!)

ss_11000
16th Nov 2006, 07:39 PM
"I'LL HAVE ONE" :cool:

thanx for the opportunity to try em.

fxst
16th Nov 2006, 08:13 PM
'I'LL HAVE ONE' thanks
be a different idea to try :) I'll pm my address to ya if thats ok
Pete

SawDustSniffer
16th Nov 2006, 08:18 PM
wood butcher
ss_11000
fxst
pease Email me @ kvanlaaum@yahoo.com
i will pay post

seach for "carbide inserts on ebay

scooter
16th Nov 2006, 08:48 PM
Well done SDS, generosity like that is one of the building blocks of the forum community we are all lucky enough to share.


Cheers..................Sean

hughie
17th Nov 2006, 12:45 AM
seach for "carbide inserts on ebay
[/quote]

Or check your local engineering machine shop. They discard all the used carbide tips, generally in the bin.
The Tungsten Carbide grinding wheel is not very expensive in places like Carbatec or Hare & Forbes I think around $15-20, been awhile since I bought one.

Watch out though as you will get a truck full of em.:D
and they are free :D

ss_11000
28th Nov 2006, 04:56 PM
got mine today. thanx again mate.
looks great and cant wait to give it a go.

TassieKiwi
29th Nov 2006, 07:42 AM
I reckon I saw them at McJing

Wood Butcher
29th Nov 2006, 07:45 AM
Got a nice little package in the mail a couple of days ago. Thanks very much.
Now just have to make a better handle than the bodgy job I used to give the tips a test run.

ralphtaff
3rd Dec 2008, 09:34 AM
Well wont you know it a good deal and here i am in the U S of A so to far but the Ci1 tool sells fore about 199.00 us dollars over here and it has the specks that you all are talking about. i seen the videos on the tool and i want one real bad but also i can not afford the store bought one so if my boys do not buy the inserts and the screw from Easy Wood Tools here in the U.S. i will buy them myself and make a tool like that.:D:D

hughie
3rd Dec 2008, 10:14 AM
Oooley dooley $199USD :o thats expensive, darned expensive. Defintely build your own ar that rate, or find somebody else to do it....... I think know some body who could........... :D

ralphtaff
3rd Dec 2008, 12:45 PM
OOPPPss. I hit the wrong button it is $119.00 still expensive. sorry about that i got in a hurry as i type one fingered and i have to look at the keys to be able to type. I am a hunt and peck typer with one finger at a time. kind of slow but it gets it done.

hughie
3rd Dec 2008, 12:48 PM
OOPPPss. I hit the wrong button it is $119.00 still expensive. s


:U me too! Hunt and Peck School of Fine Typing.

But as you say still dear for what it is, no doubt some knock offs will surface at budget prices.

ralphtaff
3rd Dec 2008, 01:02 PM
yea. the copy caters will be out there soon. if not already so you need to try one of the real thing first then try the other one then you know which one is best.when you heat the insert to weld it on to the metal bar you will lose some of the temper and it might not stay sharp as long. i personally would not heat the insert. use a bench grinder on the bar stock to get it flat. The bar stock does not have to be hard steel the regular soft steel will do. the tip or insert will take all the abuse and it should be able to take it.

Frank&Earnest
3rd Dec 2008, 01:16 PM
Look what the cat brought in! A 2 year old thread preceding our current debate, which confirms that the issue whether carbide cutters made for steel work well for timber or not has been going on for a while. I am starting to believe that once we are agreed that their purpose is roughing ("rough" being the operative word) and the "money cut" must always be made with more refined tools, it does not matter much. As somebody else said, if you can get them dirt cheap and resharpen them, there is no real advantage in buying special ones made for timber, given that there is little need for sharpening anyway. So, the real point here is that, as hobbyists, the fun is in the trying, the finer points of relative effectiveness are rather moot.

Frank&Earnest
3rd Dec 2008, 01:20 PM
. The bar stock does not have to be hard steel the regular soft steel will do. the tip or insert will take all the abuse and it should be able to take it.

Does not have to be HSS but needs to be hardened steel, the downward force on the bar is rather strong. Mild steel could bend too much.

hughie
4th Dec 2008, 12:49 PM
Shafts square or round can be made most things. But if you want some sort of quality, it would be best to go to high tensile or some variety of carbon steel.

I see the C1 Rougher uses stainless and most likely its 316 or similar as this grade. this very stiff and the rust proof aspect perhaps has a suggestion of quality about it.

But there are superior steels available such as high tensile 4140, price wise probably a bit dearer. Then there are a large range of heat treatable carbon steels just as good if not better.


As to TCT etc. Its amazing that this technology has been around in engineering for 30-40 years. In the wood industry probably a similar time, but in wood turning its relatively new.

All the C1 inventor has done has capitalize on exisiting technology and good luck to him.But many will instantly recognise many parrallels from there related industries and away we go with the copies. Then given the number of exotic cutting tips and materials out there we will see that the C1 is just scratching at the surface.

But none of these exotics will come cheap, it will be a balance of durability over cost. I guess for most hobbyists it will be too dear. But for wood turning industry in general we aint seen nothing yet.

woodwork wally
4th Dec 2008, 09:01 PM
Does not have to be HSS but needs to be hardened steel, the downward force on the bar is rather strong. Mild steel could bend too much.


Nope the 10.mm. round or square is fine as I have been using for some weeks now and not a quiver to it . The McJing one appears to standard not super according to the colour of the sparks and the ease of cutting and drilling . some folks are using stainless but that is expensive overkill also cheers WW Wally

Frank&Earnest
4th Dec 2008, 11:25 PM
Nope the 10.mm. round or square is fine as I have been using for some weeks now and not a quiver to it . The McJing one appears to standard not super according to the colour of the sparks and the ease of cutting and drilling . some folks are using stainless but that is expensive overkill also cheers WW Wally
Not everybody is as skilled as you are, WWW:). I managed to shatter a spotted gum handle trying the insert on a ss bar, mild steel would have bent.:- Of course, how soft or hard is a bit like the proverbial piece of string if we do not know the specific grade.
I agree with Hughie that ss is more for show than actual effectiveness, though.