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OGYT
16th Dec 2008, 12:17 PM
My shed has open eaves, and when I went out there at 6:30AM this morning it was 21F degrees . I built a fire in the pot belly, and by noon, the temp at my lathe (about 3m away from the stove) was only up to about 33-35F, and at the end of the shed where my sanders are, it was about 25. I couldn't stand it. Had to quit turning after making only two of those little spreaders. The gloves didn't help... I hate turning with cold fingers.
(It's now 7:15 PM, Dec 15.)
Is it winter in the down under? How cold does it get in your shed?

Gra
16th Dec 2008, 12:23 PM
it is supposed to be summer here, but we have had something like 8' of rain in the last couple of days...:((:((


I don't know how cold it gets in my shed, but under a certain temp I cant go out there anyhow (The arthur in my back plays up).

rsser
16th Dec 2008, 12:31 PM
Gotta suffer for your passions Al!

Since we're in the Sthern hemisphere, we get our winters when you get your summers.

I love the cold weather ... as long as there's a metre of snow and XC skis under me.

Have you thought about 12 v heated garments that bikers use? Gloves, jackets etc. Course you'd be tethered to the power source but once comfy prob wouldn't want to move far anyway. Or maybe strap a motorbike battery to a bum belt. The sealed glass mat units don't weigh much.

Gra
16th Dec 2008, 12:32 PM
Gotta suffer for your passions Al!

Says he with reverse cycle Air in his shed :p:p

robutacion
16th Dec 2008, 01:21 PM
My shed has open eaves, and when I went out there at 6:30AM this morning it was 21F degrees . I built a fire in the pot belly, and by noon, the temp at my lathe (about 3m away from the stove) was only up to about 33-35F, and at the end of the shed where my sanders are, it was about 25. I couldn't stand it. Had to quit turning after making only two of those little spreaders. The gloves didn't help... I hate turning with cold fingers.
(It's now 7:15 PM, Dec 15.)
Is it winter in the down under? How cold does it get in your shed?

Hi OGYT,

I'm starting to enjoy the cold "cooler" weather, after spending nearly 20 years in the tropics and in the Queensland desert and outback. The big difference is that, up here, cold means 10 degrees Celsius, 5 degrees C. and under is freezing and 0 C. is rare!

Up where I was before, anything under 25 degrees C. is cold weather so, 10 to 20 C is the norm in this area and its nice for a change. I haven't stoped going to the shed because of the cold weather, but I do, because of the heat in some summer days. The lathe shed roof is only 10" higher then me 5'.9", and with days of 40C and higher, I just can't breath, that's when I work only after sun set in most summer days.

I'm not sure what I would do, if I was living in your neck of the woods, but I would most certainly consider making a "donkey" with all the off-cuts and shavings, saw dust from the turnings, and probably a little firewood to supplement the fire going.
I am pretty certain that some people has built these sort of wood "heaters" up your way, nor a remember what they call them but the name "donkey" is a common name of the water heaters built in the "bush" isolated properties, for heating the water for showers, etc. at the property shearing sheds. These are large metal cylinders, with a water reservoir built-in. The same could be built for heating a shed. I should have a pic somewhere from, from the last one I've used in a property in NSW.
Lets see............looking..... looking............ found it!:D

Cheers:2tsup:
RBTCO

hughie
16th Dec 2008, 01:31 PM
Al,

Where I am its perhaps heat is more of an issue. It does get cold but its not really a problem for me.

Skew ChiDAMN!!
16th Dec 2008, 01:55 PM
Time to close in the eaves and insulate the shed, eh? :D

Although we're down south (the cooler part of Oz) we're in what I'd call a moderate temperate zone. Generally between about 15-30C. (60-90F-ish?) Mind you, it can drop below freezing or shoot up to over 40C (>100F) on the odd occasion... and it seems like Maw Nature has a wicked sense of humour, as these peaks are usually after a spell of the "opposite" weather just so's we feel it more. :rolleyes:

For a while there I had a sawdust burner going (a modified 44gallon drum) but I converted it into the 1st stage of my DC system. Something I kick myself over when we have the cold snaps.

It's the rain that's the real annoyance here... too much in Winter, near none in Summer. They say it's a sign of gobal warming, but I don't believe 'em... in reality it's a conspiracy of the international marketing corporations. Whole squadrons of sponge-covered U2s are flying overhead, sucking up our water to guarantee that the USA has a white Xmas. (And a profitable sales lead up.) :wink:

rsser
16th Dec 2008, 02:58 PM
Hmm, they must've been grounded to due fuel costs recently Skew.

+1 to insulation. Bulk for thermal mass if you don't get high summer temps; otherwise double sided foil batts.

FWIW, I divided my garage into two (what? space for cages on 4 wheels, joke!), and the turning space is fairly small but well insulated and has a reverse cycle Air Con (Gra, I suffered for an hour working out the necessary output :p) . Course, with your winter temps Al, a heat pump wouldn't cope.

That Donkey looks trick RBTCO. Could run hydronic heating in Al's workshop :2tsup:

Texian
16th Dec 2008, 03:09 PM
Skew,
The U2's are not bringing it to this part of Texas. We (near Austin) have had almost half of our "normal" average rainfall this year, with little if any predicted for the rest of the year. Maybe they are using it to make snow for the "slide down the hill" people.

rsser
16th Dec 2008, 03:16 PM
Tex, I fear there's no normal or average rainfall any more. :-{

Gil Jones
16th Dec 2008, 03:29 PM
Those U-2s squeezed out their sponges over Southwest Georgia last week to the tune of around 6" of rain, and a tornado. Then flew up to the Northeast, and dropped an ice storm that put out the lights in a couple million homes (many of which are still out) and such.
I run a two-ton heat pump for my shop, and while it does a great job here in Georgia, it would have a problem at the temps that Al is mentioning in Texas

Rum Pig
16th Dec 2008, 04:07 PM
We could do with some of those UFOs up here at the moment. It has not stop raining all day and we are already 200mm+ for the month, I can not keep up with the mowing at the moment :no: so come to me you little green buggers:D.

Cold weather no problem here I run my air cons at 24 degrees C and that seems to cold at times our average temp is about 33 degrees C with humidity at about 90% if it ever falls below 20 D/C then I will be complaining about the cold.

aak
16th Dec 2008, 04:39 PM
Al,

You should move over here to Melbourne, the best place on earth!:D

Regards
Andy

Gra
16th Dec 2008, 04:39 PM
Al,

You should move over here to Melbourne, the best place on earth!:D

Regards
Andy

:whs:

Ruddy
16th Dec 2008, 05:04 PM
Al,

You should move over here to Melbourne, the best place on earth!:D

Regards
Andy


Al,
This is not a good idea unless you want to experience the four seasons most days of the year.......:oo:....
I hope it warms up for you

Ruddy

Skew ChiDAMN!!
16th Dec 2008, 08:17 PM
We could do with some of those UFOs up here at the moment. It has not stop raining all day and we are already 200mm+ for the month, I can not keep up with the mowing at the moment :no: so come to me you little green buggers:D.

There's the problem! That's where the U2's are dumping their loads after running out of fuel... :wink:

Rum Pig
17th Dec 2008, 08:48 AM
There's the problem! That's where the U2's are dumping their loads after running out of fuel... :wink:

I would offer to fill there ships up but paying $1.40+ for Diesel at the moment I think i will have to let them keep dumping, 44mm yesterday and they are still in fuel trouble because it still raining.:~
I wounder if they get the Chrissy bonus:rolleyes:

OGYT
18th Dec 2008, 10:36 AM
RBTCO, I used to have something similar to that donkey, but not quite as large. It was made out of two horizontal 30 gal drums, one above the other. A door in the bottom one, to be the entrance to the fire box. The top one is connected at the back with a 6" pipe, the flue goes out the top barrel at the front. The top barrel acts as a heat collector. The Bottom barrel has to have a lining of fire brick to keep from burning through the thin metal. It worked a lot better than that little pot belly I have now.
I gave it to my son when he needed a heater in his barn. I may have to build another one. That donkey sure looks like it'd take the heat... and put it out, too.

Skew, I insulated the walls when I built the shed, and intended to finish the eaves and insulate the roof. That was in 92. Still too busy to get around to it. Every year, I decide to do it in the spring. Always get busy doing something else.:B

Aak, don't tempt me. I've wanted to go to Australia since 67, when I had a chance and didn't take it. But I guess I'm just too old to think about taking that trip now. I spent most of my life travelling with the US Army, dragging my family all around the world. But never got to go South of the Equator. I've been out now for 30 years, and still don't hanker for travel. :doh:

It sure would be interesting to have my seasons turned around. Going South means warm, here. Going South means cold, down under. I'd never make it. I get confused too easily. :D

NeilS
18th Dec 2008, 11:47 AM
Al - we get overnight frosts in many places in southern Australia, but the temp rises to tolerable levels by mid morning during sunny weather. We only get sub-freezing temps all day in a few isolated, mostly alpine, areas.

Up here next to Mt Lofty in the Adelaide Hills we rarely get down to sub-zero (last year min was 3.6c/38.5f when we had a few snow flakes), but generally the temp hangs around 5-10c/40-50f in my workshop, if unheated, for most of our long wet (foggy) winters. Comfortably above your temps, however, too cold to work without gloves... surprising how cold steel feels in the hands at those temps...:(

Then, come high summer time everything goes into reverse for a few weeks. Not as hot up here as down on the Adelaide plains, but I did register 39.7c/103.5f one day last summer during a two week heat wave.

So I'm considering passive solar heating and insulation for my new workshop. Exhausting DC system outside is also not an option for most of the year for the same reason.

Neil

aak
18th Dec 2008, 12:36 PM
.....

Aak, don't tempt me. I've wanted to go to Australia since 67, when I had a chance and didn't take it. But I guess I'm just too old to think about taking that trip now. I spent most of my life travelling with the US Army, dragging my family all around the world. But never got to go South of the Equator. I've been out now for 30 years, and still don't hanker for travel. :doh:

It sure would be interesting to have my seasons turned around. Going South means warm, here. Going South means cold, down under. I'd never make it. I get confused too easily. :D


Hi Al,

I made the move in 1980 for very different reasons to you. The best thing I did!:2tsup:Lived in Perth for 12 years, (it was and is much warmer than over here and do miss the open ocean at times), then due to needing to find work moved to Canberra, was there for 3 years and since then I live in Victoria.

Can not recommend this place highly enough. Melbourne has everything to offer both work opportunity and cultural events wise people may want. The climate is excellent in my view, neither too cold, neither too hot for 95% of the year. The odd hot days I can easily put up with. As far as having four seasons every day is concerned, yes it is true to some degree, but nothing like the four seasons at your place or in Hungary where I came from. When I retired a few years ago I moved to the outskirts of Melbourne and now live on the East side of the Bay, far from the inner city rat race.

Yes, Christmas is warm in the Southern Hemosphere, which was and is strange a bit, but there are lots of other good things to compensate!

If you are happy to find new friends then this is an excellen place to settle away from the cold winters.

Regards
Andy

rsser
18th Dec 2008, 12:45 PM
Al, yeah seasons are upside down here.

And the sun is in the wrong place your side of the world!

First trip to the Nthrn hemisphere orienting myself with the sun in the wrong place messed with my mind.

Expect you've done all this but here's some tips for keeping warm in low temps, learned from camping out in the snow:

1. Eat well
2. Wear a beanie
3. Wear a fleece neck warmer
4. Don't stand on concrete - put down some rubber mat
5. Wear polypropylene gloves
6. Run 20 x round the workshop every 15 minutes ;-}

Best wishes for the festive season.

Ed Reiss
18th Dec 2008, 12:54 PM
hmmmmm.....electrically heated turning tools!:2tsup:

rsser
18th Dec 2008, 12:57 PM
Nah, Ed, just stick to abrasive woods and sharpen often ;-}

aak
18th Dec 2008, 01:02 PM
.....
6. Run 20 x round the workshop every 15 minutes ;-}


Ern, I love this tip.:2tsup: It is especially effective if one raises the alternate knees to chest high when running around the workshop!:D While Al may be able to cope with this exercise, I would be buggered after a few laps! I am panting already just thinking about it.::p

Regards
Andy

rsser
18th Dec 2008, 01:18 PM
LOL.

Yeah, when I'm skiing back country it's good to get to the campsite at about 3.30pm. Set up the tent, sleeping bag and mat. Get everything ready to cook dinner and then head out for a hard short circuit ski. Gets the body temp up. Then dive into the tent, rug up, even in the bag if nec., cook and eat dinner and lie down. Nice and warm at that point. Pity it's only about 5.30 pm. Bladder strength is good when you have to last til 7 am, but that's another story.

NeilS
18th Dec 2008, 10:04 PM
Expect you've done all this but here's some tips for keeping warm in low temps, learned from camping out in the snow:

1. Eat well
2. Wear a beanie
3. Wear a fleece neck warmer
4. Don't stand on concrete - put down some rubber mat
5. Wear polypropylene gloves
6. Run 20 x round the workshop every 15 minutes ;-}

.

Ern, sure found No.4 essential on my concrete floor in winter. Have two 20mm thick mats, and in high winter I find both are needed, one on top of the other! Also, couldn't survive without my thermal undies.

As for No.6, who has a workshop large enough (or organised enough) to be able to run 'round' in it? Does running on the spot count.... :U.

Neil

rsser
19th Dec 2008, 05:44 AM
Anything to generate body heat Neil.

Could try squats holding the tailstock ;-}

NeilS
19th Dec 2008, 08:55 AM
Anything to generate body heat Neil.

Could try squats holding the tailstock ;-}

Brings to mind a New Zealander joke.... but won't go there :no:, in case Manuka Jock sees it... :~.

Neil

celt40
20th Dec 2008, 10:05 AM
Hi
Up here in "Bonnie Scotland" UK i have not done much turning as the temp floats around 2-3C. We are now getting to that time of year that we don't get as many warm days like that. The temp last week was as low as -2C in my shed, too cold.:U

Ed Reiss
20th Dec 2008, 12:58 PM
Nah, Ed, just stick to abrasive woods and sharpen often ;-}

Ern...thanks for reminding me to order up some more Mallee!:doh:

rsser
20th Dec 2008, 02:44 PM
Ask for Brush Box as well Ed.

Celt40 ... brr! (btw, what local woods are there for turning up your way?)

ticklingmedusa
20th Dec 2008, 06:28 PM
Right now its a sultry 45 f here in Diego tonight, inside the shop its 68.
You need a roadtrip my friend.
Your key is under the mat and the broom is in the corner.
Bring wood and you will go home with wood.
Fuel is relatively cheap again.
Since you are on dawn patrol/ day shift there will be no worries
about getting time in on the machines.
I'll take the nights.
I know you are a Oneway man but you'll like the Nova.
I was grumbling about the weather & spinning this stubborn chunk of
eucalyptus and I found this thread when I came in for tea.
I reckon I'm not as cold as I thought.

When I told my brother you were coming and he started singing
the theme song to the Beverly Hillbillies.

Kinfolk said "Jed move away from there"
Said "Californy is the place you ought to be"
So they loaded up the truck and moved to Beverly.

Hills, that is. Swimmin pools, movie stars.

In the meantime microwave those blue ice packs or dual hotwater bottles
and put one in each jacket pocket.
Cats might work if they held still.
Maybe microwave em first.
The low 20s is simply barbaric.
tm

hughie
20th Dec 2008, 06:46 PM
The low 20s is simply barbaric.Amen to that brother. :U sounds so good if it wasnt warm here I would join you. :2tsup:

OGYT
21st Dec 2008, 02:54 AM
You need a roadtrip my friend.
Your key is under the mat and the broom is in the corner.
Bring wood and you will go home with wood.
tm

Now that's an invite that is truly tempting!!
No flying or sailing involved! :2tsup:

wheelinround
21st Dec 2008, 10:39 AM
So turning frozen wood not fun eh Al

as for warming a couple of rice heat bags in your pockets or like old bike riders used to do newspapers wrapped around the legs and body to keep the cold out.

Best come spring seal those eves lay timber flooring for insulation and wood heater or similar.

Or sit in doors on the putter making plans and chatin on forum :2tsup:

celt40
21st Dec 2008, 10:45 AM
Ern
Most of our UK timber is very plain. Wych Elm, Elm, Sycamore, Ash, Beech & garden fruit trees are quite common but also quite uninteresting. Yew, Laburnum & Burr Elm is always good to use but not so easy to get hold of. There can also be some nice Spalted woods. I use mostly driftwood as i live on the coast. Not only is free but some of it is quite well seasoned due to the salt water.

NeilS
21st Dec 2008, 11:25 AM
Ern
Most of our UK timber is very plain. Wych Elm, Elm, Sycamore, Ash, Beech & garden fruit trees are quite common but also quite uninteresting. Yew, Laburnum & Burr Elm is always good to use but not so easy to get hold of. There can also be some nice Spalted woods. I use mostly driftwood as i live on the coast. Not only is free but some of it is quite well seasoned due to the salt water.

Hi Jock - I'm all for using local woods, so your 'local' wood supply from the ocean seems ideal. Does the salt water bleach out the colour from inside the driftwood the way it does on the outside, or is that sun bleaching on the outside? I assume that you do get some sunshine up your way.

Surprised that you find your fruit woods plain, they come in some lovely colours and figures down our way. I also enjoy the blond finely figured character of Sycamore when I can get it. Younger people quite like the lighter coloured woods. Spalted Sycamore also comes up a treat if it hasn't gone too far.

A bit off topic, but I thought worth a comment.

Neil

rsser
21st Dec 2008, 12:33 PM
Yeah, and Ash is good for texturing and colouring ... if you like that kind of thing.

I've got a Yew bowl blank that the brains trust debated a design for at the barbie here last night.

orificiam
21st Dec 2008, 04:25 PM
Hi Al sorry to ear it's to cold to turn.I've just come in from my shed, I took this photo
before coming in for lunch.my wife can't understand how I can spend so much time
in the shed.Well apart from the smell of wood and those shavings flying over you.
well what about the view out of my window. "didn't mean to rubb salt in to the wound"
Keep Warm and have a Merry Xmas.Cheers Tony.:)

OGYT
22nd Dec 2008, 03:14 AM
No worries about the salt, Tony. Merry Christmas to you, too. :)
Looks like it never gets cold there in KPV..........

celt40
22nd Dec 2008, 09:54 AM
Neil yes the driftwood is often bleached inside with the salt. Sometimes if the timber has come down the rivers and is beached soon after, the inside is still quite "normal"
Sorry i ment that the fruit tree wood is better grained, but i just love wood and i am glad to work with any of the hard woods. Must not sound as if i am having a moan!!!:U

Manuka Jock
24th Dec 2008, 11:38 AM
Brings to mind a New Zealander joke.... but won't go there :no:, in case Manuka Jock sees it... :~.

Neil

Try your luck pal :p

but remember , We Kiwis immigrated with our womenfolk ,
unlike the convicts who were transported with sheep ..............:D

NeilS
24th Dec 2008, 12:20 PM
.....but remember , We Kiwis immigrated with our womenfolk ,
unlike the convicts who were transported with sheep ..............:D



Good one Jock!

I knew that I was going to come off second best had I gone there... :U.

Happy Xmas.

Neil

Manuka Jock
24th Dec 2008, 12:58 PM
Good one Jock!

I knew that I was going to come off second best had I gone there... :U.

Happy Xmas.

Neil

:2tsup:

Happy Hogmanay Neil

rsser
25th Dec 2008, 05:56 PM
We Kiwis immigrated with our womenfolk , unlike the convicts who were transported with sheep ..............:D

Could make a crack about which looked better but will forbear.

Best wishes for the festive season Jock; hope the new year brings lots of lucrative work.

Manuka Jock
25th Dec 2008, 07:20 PM
Could make a crack about which looked better but will forbear.

Best wishes for the festive season Jock; hope the new year brings lots of lucrative work.


I hope it does too . I got a week and a half's work in :)


Cheers Rsser ,
Compliments of the season to you and yours .

:merrychristmas: