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ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 10:59 AM
only in miniature...


YouTube - Torspootfrezen

Paul39
4th Feb 2009, 11:42 AM
I remember seeing a device that held a spindle, and had a track with a carriage, on which was mounted a router. A cable ran over a pulley at the end of the spindle and was connected to the carriage. When you turned a crank the spindle slowly turned and the router moved along the spindle. It would make a spiral cut just like the big machine.

Sears Roebuck may have sold it. Hopefully someone on this forum knows more.

ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 11:53 AM
Routers are scary. Maybe I'll buy a round file. :)

Are scrollsaws dangerous?

Paul39
4th Feb 2009, 12:16 PM
Pretty much anything that is sharp and turns or moves is dangerous. The faster anything cuts wood, the faster it cuts you. I think scroll saws are not terribly dangerous. Chain saws are probably the most.

I just bought a good sized one with an 18" / 457mm bar. I am very respectful and careful with it.

The secret is to not get the parts of your body in the way.

A strip of poster board wound around a round spindle in a spiral to your taste, then a line drawn along one edge on the wood, and then cut out with a round wood rasp would get the spiral cut with a minimum of expense.

Leave it in the lathe to hold while you mark and rasp.

Ed Reiss
4th Feb 2009, 12:53 PM
Cool machine!!!

ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 01:03 PM
Leave it in the lathe to hold while you mark and rasp.

Planning ahead - is there anyway to stop the lathe from turning while you are rasping? Like a break...

Grumpy John
4th Feb 2009, 01:09 PM
With careful practice you can get that effect with a skew chisel :D DAMHIKT.

RETIRED
4th Feb 2009, 01:11 PM
Planning ahead - is there anyway to stop the lathe from turning while you are rasping? Like a break...Has it got a spindle lock?

You need an indexing head.

ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 05:03 PM
With careful practice you can get that effect with a skew chisel :D DAMHIKT.


How???

ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 05:07 PM
Has it got a spindle lock?

You need an indexing head.

I don't know and a what?

lol

I've entered new realms...

Grumpy John
4th Feb 2009, 05:25 PM
How???

Sorry Eliza, that comment was meant as a joke. Anyone who has used a skew chisel has had at least one massive dig in, and this can lead to a spiral runnning the length of the spindle being turned. I'm sure if you ask, some forum members will be able to supply pictures of said spirals.

Added: I checked out your website, and your art is absolutely fantastic.

ElizaLeahy
4th Feb 2009, 05:43 PM
Thank you! :)

arose62
4th Feb 2009, 07:30 PM
google "router lathe" - I've seen them for sale in Carbatec, Timbecon and other places.

Cheers,
Andrew

Eg:
http://www.timbecon.com.au/products/hand-held-router-accessories-344_0.aspx

previous post by "Johnc":
Router Handbook by Patrick Spielman (Sterling Publishing NY) has a rather simple router lathe made of timber and an electric drill using a simple sled based router. This may be similar to what you are trying to track down.

and this thread:
http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=15030

joe greiner
5th Feb 2009, 01:37 AM
Try a forum search for [legacy mill]. Ten hits just now. Yes, Sears sold such a contraption eons ago. In the video, note that cutting is done in only one direction, not on the return trip. This is to force backlash against only one side of the "programme," for consistency. Rotary Tables, aka Dividing Heads and such, work best this way too.

The tricky part of making the skew spiral, is following the original spiral for the second cut. With just the right combination of diameter and speed, you can make them with a spindle gouge too.:-:D

Cheers,
Joe

Paul39
5th Feb 2009, 07:57 AM
A spindle lock would be a brake or pin that would keep the work piece from turning while you rasped or carved on it.

A dividing head is a round plate or one of the pulleys on the spindle that has a series of evenly spaced holes around the edge. Usually a pin mounted on the head stock will fit in the hole selected to lock the work piece in position.

If you wanted to make a column with six flutes, you would stop the work piece 1/6th of the way around and chisel, scrape, or route your flutes.

If your lathe is not furnished with a pin lock, a cheap and dirty brake would be to take the tool rest out of the banjo, slide the banjo to the left and out so about 3 inches sticks out from the bed.

Tie a 3 to 4 foot piece of clothes line or 1/4 inch + - rope to the banjo, take 2 or 3 turns over the top of your work piece or chuck and bring the rope back to the banjo, pull it tight, and take a turn or two and tie it off.

For a dividing head, make a circle of cardboard an inch or two larger than your chuck, mark it equally in as many places around the edge as pleases you. A plastic protractor and ruler used to extend the degree markings to the edge will work.

Cut a hole in the cardboard to fit tightly on the spindle nose. Take off your chuck, put the cardboard all the way on, replace chuck.

Make a pointer from a piece of coat hanger wire, or turn one from a nice piece of wood, tape that to your headstock so that it points to the edge of the cardboard, and you now have a dividing head.

One could use a sheet of aluminum, or a pie pan the right size, but this will get something to try with a minimum of expense and labor.

Manuka Jock
5th Feb 2009, 09:29 AM
Thank you! :)
Eliza , do you have a link to your website ?
I could not see it on your profile , or at the bottom of your posts .

Jock

ElizaLeahy
5th Feb 2009, 09:44 AM
I'm going to have to do some research, I can see.

Jock - www.elizasart.com is one of them www.painted-pet.com is another.

Hope you enjoy them! :)

(I'll make a sig one of these days)

Ed Reiss
6th Feb 2009, 06:43 AM
Eliza...in the latest issue of Woodturning Design (spring 2009, which just came out), there is a very informative article by David Reed Smith on blanking out and turning knitting needles, that might be of value in your pursuit of turning hair pins.

Woodturning Design is available in your area at Carrol's Woodcraft Supplies, Drysdale, Victoria.

Checked out your website...your drawings are superb:2tsup:

ElizaLeahy
6th Feb 2009, 07:31 AM
Eliza...in the latest issue of Woodturning Design (spring 2009, which just came out), there is a very informative article by David Reed Smith on blanking out and turning knitting needles, that might be of value in your pursuit of turning hair pins.

Woodturning Design is available in your area at Carrol's Woodcraft Supplies, Drysdale, Victoria.

Checked out your website...your drawings are superb:2tsup:

Thanks Ed! I'll check it out!

dr4g0nfly
7th Feb 2009, 05:51 AM
I remember seeing a device that held a spindle, and had a track with a carriage, on which was mounted a router. A cable ran over a pulley at the end of the spindle and was connected to the carriage. When you turned a crank the spindle slowly turned and the router moved along the spindle. It would make a spiral cut just like the big machine.

Sears Roebuck may have sold it. Hopefully someone on this forum knows more.

Trend do a Router Lathe - I think it's what your talking about, see the link,

http://www.trend-uk.com/en/UK/product/R_LATHE/6/lathe/routerlathe_.html

lubbing5cherubs
7th Feb 2009, 10:54 PM
Check this link out it does miniature it made for pen size
http://www.bealltool.com/products/turning/lathewiz.php
enjoy Toni

ElizaLeahy
8th Feb 2009, 09:02 AM
Check this link out it does miniature it made for pen size
http://www.bealltool.com/products/turning/lathewiz.php
enjoy Toni


That's a clever little machine!