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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Ballarat, Victoria
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    Default WIP Celtic Chest

    Hi everyone.
    I joined this website I think years ago but never really made much use of it....possibly as i was on and off with my wood working.

    I am getting back into woodworking again, I'm not that good but i enjoy the process which is what matters. I know in time I will learn more and become better at things.

    I am currently working on making a Celtic knot chest that I designed. I am making it out of old pellet wood....which I think might be quite terrible wood for carving...not sure if its just me and maybe not sharp enough tools or not.

    Anyway I have spent about 3-4 days now making the chest, pictures below.

    DSC00426.jpg
    DSC00425.jpg

    I am kind of all over the place with how I do things, like I will do some cutting, then some assembly, a bit of carving then some staining....and then just jump around doing different things. I know its not the way most people would do things but I am happy.

    Still need to finish making the feet, decorative wood rope and then the lid

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Mornington Peninsula
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    2,493

    Default

    Looking good.

    When you finish it, you can come over and start on mine.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Waitpinga
    Posts
    835

    Default

    Hi Spoonman, Not sure there is a 'formula' for making wood stuff. If there is most of us here wouldn't know or care! Chest looks rustically wonderful! Like the recycled element too. I try to have a similar philosophy by using as much found and recycled wood as I can.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Ponchatoula, LA, USA
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Hard to tell what the wood is in the pallets you used - could be most anything from pine to oak to some exotic wood. I do think you've done a wonderful job on the carving, though!

    Claude

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    McBride BC Canada
    Posts
    3,414

    Default

    Carving sharp tools might have made a small difference. They fail in the face of what you have done.
    The process changes for every carving = don't feel the least concerned as none of us were faced with
    the puzzles of bringing off what you have done. Damn good work. My final opinion.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ballarat, Victoria
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the positive comments. Yes I am unsure what the wood is. I thought it might be pine but some of it seems to have more wood grain character to it than what I would see for sale at the hardware store....although some of it does seem kind of weak which I didn't think would be the case with a hardwood. I like carving more than building the box, so its rough as guts and would never pass a fine furniture...but to be honest, I like that. Maybe its the style of the box with the carving that suits the rough look, with gaps everywhere and cuts that aren't straight. I was thinking about that today. I appreciate peoples skills in making precision furniture, but I don't think that is something everyone should aspire to....rough as guts is has its own charm too...and i think it demonstrates my interest more in carving and making an object rather than spending additional time to make it precision.

    In terms of tool sharpness, I thought my tools were pretty sharp, could cut paper or hair off my arm...but they dull quickly which I think is because they are cheap tools....so maybe don't hold an edge well.

    Anyway, here is what the box looks like today. I finished all the feet and have them glued and clamped. Had to redesign the back legs to fit the sides as the original design feet didn't allow to pieces back to back due to not enough room

    I blacked out the back ground to give more focus to the design. Next will be the lid which will be a big task for what I have in mind

    Monday-Front.jpg

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Waitpinga
    Posts
    835

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    [QUOTE=Spoonman;1948049]I appreciate peoples skills in making precision furniture, but I don't think that is something everyone should aspire to....rough as guts is has its own charm too...

    Couldn't agree more! It would be a boring old world if we all worked the same.

    In terms of tool sharpness, I thought my tools were pretty sharp, could cut paper or hair off my arm...but they dull quickly which I think is because they are cheap tools....so maybe don't hold an edge well.[QUOTE=Spoonman;1948049]

    Recycled wood like this can have a lot of fine sand and dust impregnated in the grain. This is particularly true of pallets which are often dragged over dirt etc. This particulate matter is essentially microscopic pieces of rock and they absolutely rip the hell out of a cutting edge. Even top quality tools are no match for this stuff. Whenever I have to work in wood I know has been laying in dirt (stumps, fenceposts, old pallets etc.) I try to minimise this by pressure washing the wood and letting it dry thoroughly before commencing work. Even then, I have to be prepared to sharpen a lot more frequently.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Braidwood NSW
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Wow it looks amazing! I love the rustic look. Always reminds me of early Australia when people built beautiful things with what they had. I do admit my other half has made many things from bit and pieces lying around (through necessity) and they've been strong and have a very personal touch. Your chest has heaps of charm and heaps of character. Absolutely magnificent! Well done!

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ballarat, Victoria
    Posts
    29

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    [QUOTE=Whittling;1948092][QUOTE=Spoonman;1948049]I appreciate peoples skills in making precision furniture, but I don't think that is something everyone should aspire to....rough as guts is has its own charm too...

    Couldn't agree more! It would be a boring old world if we all worked the same.

    In terms of tool sharpness, I thought my tools were pretty sharp, could cut paper or hair off my arm...but they dull quickly which I think is because they are cheap tools....so maybe don't hold an edge well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spoonman View Post

    Recycled wood like this can have a lot of fine sand and dust impregnated in the grain. This is particularly true of pallets which are often dragged over dirt etc. This particulate matter is essentially microscopic pieces of rock and they absolutely rip the hell out of a cutting edge. Even top quality tools are no match for this stuff. Whenever I have to work in wood I know has been laying in dirt (stumps, fenceposts, old pallets etc.) I try to minimise this by pressure washing the wood and letting it dry thoroughly before commencing work. Even then, I have to be prepared to sharpen a lot more frequently.
    Thanks for your information about the pellet wood. I never really thought about it but that would make a lot of sense to why my chisels are currently as sharp as a spoon.
    They need a full blown re-sharpen too which takes me quite a long time as I spend a lot of time on each one. I didn't understand why they seemed to be getting so dull so quickly as when I have carved pine from the hardware store, they have stayed sharp for so much longer..only needing a slight strop now and then.
    I will just accept that this is how it is with this pellet wood.
    I do enjoy sharpening too though...as I try my best to take my time and enjoy every process of wood working..and I see sharpening as a part of the process. I think it is good way to approach it personally. That way I get satisfaction out of everything i do...and I enjoy the skills I have taught myself just in sharpening....I find it very satisfying carving with a razor sharp tool you have sharpened yourself.

  11. #10
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    Apr 2011
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    Ballarat, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by Featherwood View Post
    Wow it looks amazing! I love the rustic look. Always reminds me of early Australia when people built beautiful things with what they had. I do admit my other half has made many things from bit and pieces lying around (through necessity) and they've been strong and have a very personal touch. Your chest has heaps of charm and heaps of character. Absolutely magnificent! Well done!
    Thanks Featherwood. I am liking the way it is turning out too. I'm not 100% sure what I like about its lack of refinement but it just works for me. Maybe it says that you don't need to master wood working to make something you are proud of and enjoy.....and maybe it says to others the same thing too. Insode the box the bottom planks aren't planed at all so there is 2 planks in particular that have a wide gap where the timber isn't smooth....and for some reason I really love this.....maybe it reminds me of what you have said about early Australia with people doing the best with what they had, and the best of their abilities? I'm not sure but I think I will approach other items in a similar way in the future.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Albury Well Just Outside
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    13,303

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    One thing that I find quite nice about wood working there are more than one way of making something. Of course there are some things that just have to follow a path but even that path can vary when you come across a problem.

    The chest you are building is interesting not sure what you have planned for the top but definitely pulling up a chair to see what you come up with.

  13. #12
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    Apr 2011
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    Ballarat, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christos View Post
    One thing that I find quite nice about wood working there are more than one way of making something. Of course there are some things that just have to follow a path but even that path can vary when you come across a problem.

    The chest you are building is interesting not sure what you have planned for the top but definitely pulling up a chair to see what you come up with.
    Yes it's true about more than way most of the time. I often stop and think about different ways to do something. I am self taught so may not be doing things the "proper" way...but as long as it doesn't fall apart I'm not fussed.

    Yes the top will be interesting. I have a few ideas floating around for the sides of it, but not the top yet. I sometimes just stand looking at what I am making and visualize different ideas in my mind.
    I have decided though that a flat lid just won't work for the current design...so the lid will have some thickness to it...I am thinking around 125mm thick at present. The only thing I need to be aware of is that by making a lid so thick that when I open the lid, it will need some clearance from the wall to allow for the thickness of the lid. I thought of a detail to avoid this problem, but I have decided to not adjust the thickness at all to suit this detail and just live with the box needed some clearance to the wall. But that idea may still vary some.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Perth
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    470

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    Hi Spoonman, I didn't notice this chest is your work, your not quite the novice you made out to be on my post This is very good considering you have used pallet wood which is probably hard to carve and a Celtic knot is no easy pattern. I like others really like the rustic look. Great work, looking forward to seeing it when the lid goes on.

  15. #14
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    Mar 2016
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    Lake Dallas, Texas
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    14

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    This looks very impressive.

  16. #15
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    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ballarat, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robthechisel View Post
    Hi Spoonman, I didn't notice this chest is your work, your not quite the novice you made out to be on my post This is very good considering you have used pallet wood which is probably hard to carve and a Celtic knot is no easy pattern. I like others really like the rustic look. Great work, looking forward to seeing it when the lid goes on.
    haha, I still feel like quite an amateur. I think the small photo hides a lot of mistakes and bad technique....but I have a little understanding of the basics of carving but still learning. I often watch youtube videos to try and get a better understanding of tools to use and ways to do things....but I haven't found all the answers yet to best way to do things. I think the basic knowledge and skills I have is enough to get done what I want at present. My next big thing will be to try carving in the round. That looks quite challenging

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