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  1. #1
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    Default Can I use 18mm "Pallet Grade" Ply for this torsion style bed base?

    Can I use 18mm "Pallet Grade" Ply for this torsion style bed base?

    Torsion Bed Base.jpg

    Hardwood Pallet Grade Plywood 2440 x 1220 x 18mm | eBay
    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

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  3. #2
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    Nov 2012
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    Your mattress needs open air to breath. As a guide, you shouldn't cover more than half the area on the underside of a mattress. At the same time, a mattress needs to be supported for about half the area. That's why slats are often used.

  4. #3
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    Default

    Thanks for the reply.

    I plan on using this on the top of the base:
    LONSET Slatted bed base - Full/Double - IKEA

    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Sydney
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barrysumpter View Post
    Can I use 18mm "Pallet Grade" Ply for this torsion style bed base?
    What are your questions/concerns?
    Is the fact that it's "pallet grade" your concern? Is that concern because of face condition, or structural strength, or ??

  6. #5
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    Default

    It was the structural strength of pallet grade.
    But am convinced all will be well with the torsion box design.
    I was happy with my previous supplier but they don't sell my ply anymore.
    It wouldn't have been structural grade for the price I was paying.
    I've used it for all my work shop fit outs without issue.

    The face looks OK.
    If not, we can paint, stain, bleach or face it with something else.
    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

  7. #6
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    Default

    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

  8. #7
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    May 2007
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    Default

    Obviously there is pallet grade and stuff actually used in pallets. I reused some stuff from a deconstructed pallet awhile ago and it makes that lot look high structural, good 2 face furniture grade.
    Franklin

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Perth W.A
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    713

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by justonething View Post
    Your mattress needs open air to breath. As a guide, you shouldn't cover more than half the area on the underside of a mattress. At the same time, a mattress needs to be supported for about half the area. That's why slats are often used.
    Very good point as damp will get trapped and cause mould. You could cut the ply into strips though, which would be fine.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by justonething View Post
    Your mattress needs open air to breath. As a guide, you shouldn't cover more than half the area on the underside of a mattress. At the same time, a mattress needs to be supported for about half the area. That's why slats are often used.
    Very good point as damp will get trapped and cause mould. You could cut the ply into strips though, which would be fine.

  10. #9
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    Oct 2007
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    Alexandra Vic
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    Default

    My reading of the bed layout drawing is that it is open rather than sheeted on the bottom, but I may be wrong.

    Even if I have misinterpreted the drawing, I doubt whether the overall design would qualify as a torsion box as the storage drawer openings in the end and sides reduce the rigidity of those members significantly, and the internal gridwork is fairly sparce. However as a structural unit to support the base you linked to, plus mattress and a couple of bodies, I believe it should be adequate. I would advise that you personally check the plywood prior to purchase, but the additional pics that you added suggest that you may have done this. From the ebay listing the quote the material as being popular core with hardwood facing, which I suspect is an officeworkers attempt at 'poplar core'. The images in the listing give the impression that the material may be void free, but many plywoods these days have voids even though the carry grades that don't allow for voids, such as 'Marine ply".

    Personally, I would add a batten along each side of the central divider to give you something to attach the top sheets to, I would not like to butt two loaded sheet edges side by side on a single 18mm wide sheet edge.

    I would also be concerned about the overall weight of the unit as regards to getting it into the bedroom as a complete assembly through potentially tight access situations. Obviously you can be more aware of the access situation than I am, but having dealt with similar structures in the past and getting them into and out of bedrooms through narrow passages with limited room to swing in the passage or the bedroom, I can attest that a knock down bed frame is easier to handle in tight spaces.

    Ventilation between the base and mattress is being handled by the slat system you plan to use, but I suggest that you try and raise the main frame of the floor a small amount to ventilate under the base as well, particularly if it will be mounted on a concrete slab floor. We started with a platform base on a concrete slab in our first house and in the first winter the inside of the platform became covered in mould and mildew. It was subsequently cleaned with bleach and bondcreted, but also had a number of 2in holes cut into each surface with a holesaw to allow it to breath. We also bondcreted the floor to ensure that it was well sealed, and had no further issues for the 20 or so years that we used the platform. But I suspect a modest air gap under the the platform would be more acceptable than 20 2in holes around the edges and another 20 on the platform.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Alexandra Vic
    Age
    64
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    2,530

    Default

    My reading of the bed layout drawing is that it is open rather than sheeted on the bottom, but I may be wrong.

    Even if I have misinterpreted the drawing, I doubt whether the overall design would qualify as a torsion box as the storage drawer openings in the end and sides reduce the rigidity of those members significantly, and the internal gridwork is fairly sparce. However as a structural unit to support the base you linked to, plus mattress and a couple of bodies, I believe it should be adequate.

    I would advise that you personally check the plywood prior to purchase, but the additional pics that you added suggest that you may have done this. From the ebay listing the quote the material as being popular core with hardwood facing, which I suspect is an officeworkers attempt at 'poplar core'. The images in the listing give the impression that the material may be void free, but many plywoods these days have voids even though the carry grades that don't allow for voids, such as 'Marine ply".

    Personally, I would add a batten along each side of the central divider to give you something to attach the top sheets to, I would not like to butt two loaded sheet edges side by side on a single 18mm wide sheet edge.

    I would also be concerned about the overall weight of the unit as regards to getting it into the bedroom as a complete assembly through potentially tight access situations. Obviously you can be more aware of the access situation than I am, but having dealt with similar structures in the past and getting them into and out of bedrooms through narrow passages with limited room to swing in the passage or the bedroom, I can attest that a knock down bed frame is easier to handle in tight spaces.

    Ventilation between the base and mattress is being handled by the slat system you plan to use, but I suggest that you try and raise the main frame of the floor a small amount to ventilate under the base as well, particularly if it will be mounted on a concrete slab floor. We started with a platform base on a concrete slab in our first house and in the first winter the inside of the platform became covered in mould and mildew. It was subsequently cleaned with bleach and bondcreted to seal it, but also had a number of 2in holes cut into each surface with a holesaw to allow it to breath. We also bondcreted the floor to ensure that it was well sealed, and had no further issues for the 20 or so years that we used the platform. But I suspect a modest air gap under the the platform would be more acceptable than 20 2in holes around the edges and another 20 on the platform.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
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    Glen Iris, Vic, Australia
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    Default

    Any suggestions other than using a 1/4" roundover bit to soften the sharp edges?
    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

  13. #12
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    Default

    A plane followed by 120/180 sandpaper - the way it would have been done before routers.
    Tom

    "It's good enough" is low aim

  14. #13
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    Default

    Well, I don't have a 1/4" so used a recently purchased 1/8".
    With the makita trim router.
    Makes quick work.
    Looks really nice.

    went right to 240 on the clean up.

    Is that 120 or 180 sandpaper or is it 120 then 180 sandpaper?
    Thanks,
    Barry G. Sumpter
    May Yesterdays Tears Quench the Thirst for Tomorrows Revenge

  15. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barrysumpter View Post

    Is that 120 or 180 sandpaper or is it 120 then 180 sandpaper?
    Either or both
    Tom

    "It's good enough" is low aim

  16. #15
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    Default

    When using sandpaper, start at the lowest number and work through to the higher number.
    Whether you start at 120 or 180 will depend on the condition at start, the desired finish and also your stamina.

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