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  1. #1
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    Default Angled edge lap?

    I've got a fun little project. My Nephew wants to make a little record holder like pictured.

    IMG_0741.jpg
    IMG_0742.jpg

    He's got some lovely rough sawn Huon Pine boards that will be just perfect for this IMO.
    Looking at the pics, I see an angled edge lap joint. I don't know what's inside... it might be reinforced somehow, or it might not. Perhaps not the strongest joint, especially since vinyl records are heavy, and I think this design is intended to be knockdown construction with no glue.

    How might I go about making this?
    I have the equipment needed to mill the parts from RS stock.
    If I go with angled edge lap for joinery, I could cut a housing to reinforce the joint. Like this.

    IMG_1270.jpg

    I'd probably do this on the table saw. Start by cutting the angled laps with the blade tilted to the desired angle. Then cut stopped housing by hand with chisels, clean up the bottom with router plane.

    Does this sound like a reasonable approach?

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  3. #2
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    Default

    I would keep the joinery simple and only cut angled dadoes in the two feet. To stop the feet from "tripping" you could put a dowel in the joint or simply screw in from the bottom.

    If you did want to go fancy then I would forget the table saw and either use a router or do the whole thing by hand.

    Just my 2c
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  4. #3
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    Thanks Chief.

    I like your idea of only cutting a housing in the feet. Simple is good.

    Whatchya mean by 'tripping'?

  5. #4
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    By "tripping" I mean rotating about their longitudinal axis if a force is applied at right angles to them; ie if a record was being pushed in or pulled out from the side rather than from above.
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  6. #5
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    Gotcha. Pull the record, and the whole side comes out with it. Disaster.
    Aaaaah, you mean no lap joint at all, just deep angled dadoes that house the full thickness of the side pieces. Hence the need for pinning or screwing to avoid tripping.

    Not sure it's simpler TBH. I could pin it with a dowel or screw, but it will require some accurate angled drilling, which can be a real PITA.

  7. #6
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    Default

    It's going to sound like a terrible hack (because it is), you can take Chief's suggestion and put a screw in from the bottom but it doesn't even have to be an angled hole, as long as the screw goes through the base and into the side. Just make sure the screw length and entry point are ok and you could just put a small screw vertically through the base and into the side. It'll all be hidden by the bit of the side inside the dado.

  8. #7
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    Here’s what we ended up with. I went with simple. The feet were cut with a dado stack on an angle, and cleaned up with chisels. I dialled it in with shims for a perfect friction fit. It doesn’t need screws IMO. Rock solid, and I don’t think wood movement will be a problem with this orientation. Finished up with a very light chamfer with a block plane.

    Quite a fun project. I ended up resawing some nice Vic Ash for the book-matched gain on the sides, and used up a nice short piece of Blackwood I had lying around. It’s an awesome combo.

    It’ll probably get finished in Osmo. Perhaps the most fun part was making this with my nephew, and teaching him a few things. We had a great time!
    0969A74D-2F5E-44C8-92DB-08BFEA822989.jpg

  9. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rogerwilco
    ... He's got some lovely rough sawn Huon Pine boards that will be just perfect for this IMO. ...
    Record Rack.jpg

    Rather unusual looking "Huon Pine".

    Nice design and execution. "Simple is not easy". [No where to hide any mistakes.

  10. #9
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    Yes! The piece of HP was just one short board, something like 120x25x700. Nowhere near enough. And the other bits of myrtle were basically off cuts. Had a lot more fun resawing a hunk of 45mm Vic Ash I had in the rack, and pairing that with some Tas Blackwood had around. It’s a pretty reliable combo I reckon. I’m also really enjoying taking a piece of wood, and getting the best out it, as opposed to trying to ‘use up’ random scrappy bits. If you’re gonna spend a bunch of hours building something by hand, it seems obvious to treat yourself to nice materials!

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