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  1. #1
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    Default Drill at an angle

    want to hang my sash clamps, pipe clamps etc etc on a wall.
    The only space I have suitable I can drill into and fit dowel timber, however how can I use a cordless drill and make all holes at a slight angle so when everything is in place they dont slide off the dowel pieces.??
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    want to hang my sash clamps, pipe clamps etc etc on a wall.
    The only space I have suitable I can drill into and fit dowel timber, however how can I use a cordless drill and make all holes at a slight angle so when everything is in place they dont slide off the dowel pieces.??
    set up a bevel gauge at the angle you need and place it next to where you want to drill. Start drilling vertically so the bit bites, then tilt to match the gauge.

  4. #3
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    I've found the easiest way is to make the hole through a small block of wood at the angle you want with the same size drill bit on a drill press.
    The hold the block with the bit through the hole up against the wood you want the rack on - like taz says, start with making a shallow hole vertically.
    That way you get the same angle every time.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I've found the easiest way is to make the hole through a small block of wood at the angle you want with the same size drill bit on a drill press.
    The hold the block with the bit through the hole up against the wood you want the rack on - like taz says, start with making a shallow hole vertically.
    That way you get the same angle every time.
    of course use a template, derrr why didnt I think of that?
    answer we have been on a learning crash course with our 80w laser cutter, had a guy over from Adel for 2 days and taught us more than I thought possible.
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

  6. #5
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    It's often easier to use a spade bit rather than a normal twist drill, the tip on the spade will help keep it in position, where the flutes on a twist tend to want to walk across the face of the timber. Use the guide block as well.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  7. #6
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    Not sure about your individual situation, nor that of BobL or taz01, but I would start drilling perpendicular to the surface (in the case of a wall - horizontal), then adjust the drill to the desired angle.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Handyjack View Post
    Not sure about your individual situation, nor that of BobL or taz01, but I would start drilling perpendicular to the surface (in the case of a wall - horizontal), then adjust the drill to the desired angle.
    That's basically what I said, except I also said to get the same angle use a template.

    Another trick I have heard of but not used is to drive some (~3) small brads into the bottom of the template that rests on the wood being drilled into and then bite them off with pincers so that only a mm or so protrudes above the underside of the template. if the template is then held firmly against the wood being drilled the 4 brads will have enough grip top present the template walking under the effect of the slanted bit. which means there's no need to drill a short vertical hole first. A mate of mine drilled over 100 angled holes with this template and brad method.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I've found the easiest way is to make the hole through a small block of wood at the angle you want with the same size drill bit on a drill press.
    The hold the block with the bit through the hole up against the wood you want the rack on - like taz says, start with making a shallow hole vertically.
    That way you get the same angle every time.
    Or - taking this idea one step further, you could make an actual rack by taking a piece of timber, drilling it on your drill press at the right angles etc, then insert your dowels in that, and then hang that piece of timber on the wall. Means you can move it later.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Man View Post
    Or - taking this idea one step further, you could make an actual rack by taking a piece of timber, drilling it on your drill press at the right angles etc, then insert your dowels in that, and then hang that piece of timber on the wall. Means you can move it later.
    I did a similar sort of thing to make a metal rack.
    The holes are drilled at 5 off perpendicular into 6mm thick steel strap.
    The 1/2" steel rods are inserted into the holes and welded from behind.
    The rods also have their outer 40 mm bent at a slight angle to reduce the likelihood of stuff rolling off.
    A rack is painted but short length of poly pipe is put over the rods to eliminate the paint being knocked off and getting rusty.
    The straps are suspended from a purlin and also attached to the wall.
    The photo was taken back in 2011, a lot more stuff on it how
    stackedrack.jpg

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by malb View Post
    It's often easier to use a spade bit rather than a normal twist drill, the tip on the spade will help keep it in position, where the flutes on a twist tend to want to walk across the face of the timber. Use the guide block as well.
    This method would work the best for you, the spade bits are far superior in getting a detailed hole in that situation, an auger bit would be another option

  12. #11
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    Cheers guys,
    I like the idea of a block of wood with 'template hole' drilled through it,
    I like the idea of little pricks poking through to hold onto base.
    I like the idea of a splade bit....if Ive got one the right size, Trying to go cold turkey and stay away from bunnings for 2 weeks, failed 3 times already.
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

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