Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default Greatest drum sander cabinet...I've ever made ;)

    Hi guys,

    After finishing my router table cabinet I proceeded to make a cabinet for my new Supermax 25-50 drum sander.

    It's tassie oak, with hand cut dovetailed pine drawers with frame and panel tassie oak fronts to match the frame and panel doors.

    Mortise and tenon construction -

    IMG_20200410_222324_016.jpg

    Tongue and groove boards for the side panels and floor panel -
    IMG_20200413_213832_423.jpg

    5lb mallet came in handy during glue up!

    IMG_20200417_224302_583.jpg

    A few sliding dovetail joints throughout -

    IMG_20200419_211445_576.jpg

    IMG_20200412_210847_713.jpg

    More to follow shortly.

    Cheers, Dom

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Top was a sheet of ply edged with tassie oak.

    IMG_20200422_070420_851.jpg

    Drawer dovetails. You don't really see them on the finished piece but I know they are there.

    IMG_20200426_202634_396.jpg

    Drawers glued up. On a side note, can't believe pine costs more than furniture grade hardwoods like American Oak etc!

    IMG_20200430_093407_353.jpg

    Mortise and tenon for drawer and door rails and stiles.

    IMG_20200504_220220_756.jpg

    Cheers, Dom

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    The sander was fitted to the base and some casters installed.

    IMG_20200529_075001_354.jpg

    Drawer fronts and doors were assembled. I made the doors and drawer fronts with solid floating oak panels. I decided to run the draw front grain vertically and from the same piece of timber (book-match glue-up for the approx 350mm width) as the doors to get a coherent and grain matched appearance. I tried to use straight grain throughout the piece to give a cleaner look.

    DSC_1693.jpg

    The sliding dovetail junction of the door and drawer dividers.

    IMG_20200529_075001_305.jpg

    Doors and drawers fitted.

    IMG_20200512_205527_258.jpg

    And basically finished.

    IMG_20200516_222026_337.jpg

    IMG_20200529_075001_303.jpg

    DSC_1768.jpg


    Now I just need some dust hose and I can try it out.

    Cheers, Dom

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    blue mountains
    Posts
    4,215

    Default

    Very nice Dom. Better than most of the furnishing in my house. Still having a plesant work space is good.
    Regards
    John

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by orraloon View Post
    Very nice Dom. Better than most of the furnishing in my house. Still having a plesant work space is good.
    Regards
    John
    Thanks John.

    Yeah I figure it's good practice for actual furniture projects and as you say having a nice workspace is a plus. I like that there is no pressure when making shop furniture/projects - leaves you free to try things and just get on with it rather than stressing too much about aesthetic design choices.

    Cheers,

    Dom

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Bentleigh East
    Age
    46
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I've seen $3k TV units with less joinery than that. It's beautiful

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
    I've seen $3k TV units with less joinery than that. It's beautiful
    Thanks a lot!

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    2,739

    Default

    Delightful work, Dom, well done.

    Quote Originally Posted by DomAU
    ...On a side note, can't believe pine costs more than furniture grade hardwoods like American Oak etc! ...
    Was very surprised by your statement so I checked with my usual timber supplier. His quotes for Tas oak were more than double his price of radiata - for select grade. Either you have a great source for American Oak, or the wrong supplier....


    There is also a really subtle psychological factor in having something so good in your workshop. It subconsciously sets the standard for all future work.

    Many years ago, as I kept buying crap tools, a friend suggested strongly that I buy "just one aspirational tool; something buy Chris Vespers, Terry Gordon or Colen Clenton". Then everytime I handled that tool I would be reminded that better was possible and achievable.

    I think your sander cabinet may fill a similar role.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    Delightful work, Dom, well done.



    Was very surprised by your statement so I checked with my usual timber supplier. His quotes for Tas oak were more than double his price of radiata - for select grade. Either you have a great source for American Oak, or the wrong supplier....


    There is also a really subtle psychological factor in having something so good in your workshop. It subconsciously sets the standard for all future work.

    Many years ago, as I kept buying crap tools, a friend suggested strongly that I buy "just one aspirational tool; something buy Chris Vespers, Terry Gordon or Colen Clenton". Then everytime I handled that tool I would be reminded that better was possible and achievable.

    I think your sander cabinet may fill a similar role.
    Thanks Graeme,

    Yeah the pine was from the big green shed and came to about $3800- per cubic vs about $2300- for the Tassie Oak and about $4000- last time I bought American Oak.

    Yeah I agree with you. Especially using fine tools - I agree there is a psychological boost/effect on top of any actual functional benefit.

    Cheers, Dom

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    3,650

    Default

    Love to get tas oak at your prices

    I just bought some pine and tas oak for some workshop drawers last weekend.
    Pine was 185x19mm and tas oak was 160x19mm.

    Pine worked out at $3080 a cubic m and tas oak was $5790 a cubic m

    A 3 metre length of tas oak the same size as the pine was $8000 a cubic m.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    428

    Default

    Dom, your grain selection and orientation is absolutely spot on. I'll one up orraloon - your garage furnishings are better than all the stuff inside my house, not just some.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sutherland Shire, Sydney
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,229

    Default

    That cabinet is workshop furniture, certainly not 'just' a stand for a thickness sander.
    Some very nice joinery there, it will last a lifetime and then some.
    Very impressed.

    Alan...

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lappa View Post
    Love to get tas oak at your prices

    I just bought some pine and tas oak for some workshop draws last weekend.
    Pine was 185x19mm and tas oak was 160x19mm.

    Pine worked out at $3080 a cubic m and tas oak was $5790 a cubic m

    A 3 metre length of tas oak the same size as the pine was $8000 a cubic m.
    Probably because I always buy my Tassie Oak as structural grade timber rather than furniture grade. Takes a bit of careful selection with maybe 1 in 20 pieces suitable but that's the tradeoff I guess!

    Cheers, Dom

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Al View Post
    That cabinet is workshop furniture, certainly not 'just' a stand for a thickness sander.
    Some very nice joinery there, it will last a lifetime and then some.
    Very impressed.

    Alan...
    Thanks Alan, much appreciated!

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alkahestic View Post
    Dom, your grain selection and orientation is absolutely spot on. I'll one up orraloon - your garage furnishings are better than all the stuff inside my house, not just some.
    Haha, thanks mate. In terms of joinery quality it's nicer than any furniture in my house as well! .

    Cheers, Dom

Similar Threads

  1. Home made drum sander
    By *Kev in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 5th Feb 2010, 08:24 PM
  2. home made drum sander
    By Weekend hack in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 17th Jul 2009, 07:04 PM
  3. Home made drum sander.
    By Papa in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 1st May 2009, 09:13 PM
  4. Another home made drum sander....
    By Redgy in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 9th Apr 2007, 10:30 PM
  5. Home Made Drum Sander
    By OldAussie in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 5th Sep 2004, 01:11 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •