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  1. #1
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    Default dumb, stupid or great idea

    for those with table saws and thinking about zero inserts, but daunted by either buying or making them.

    I had the same problem and last night a brain wave/fart idea.
    Use a strip of heavy black sticky tape, I used some similar to electrical but 3x wider.
    Lowered the blade, stick this tape down, press it hard so it really sticks, cut around the front edge of insert, turn saw on, then slightly raise blade, until you see riving knife start to press. turn off saw cut either side of riving knife then start saw again and raise further.
    You will need to do this several times as riving knife pushes through.

    What happens when I need to change angle of blade? well I guess we start again, but it works great as an interim until I get my various zero inserts made from perspex.
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

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  3. #2
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    Default

    I quite often just run a strip of painters masking tape either side of the blade.

  4. #3
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    Am I missing something here? What purpose does the tape serve?

    My impression is that a zero clearance insert (throat plate) is used to support and to prevent thin rips being drawn down into the saw slot.

    I understand that the zero clearance insert will reduce chip out on the underside of a cut but using tape offers very little support at the beginning and end of the board. The tape may also become a serious hazard in itself if it becomes detached or if/when debris attaches to the exposed adhesive on the underside.
    Last edited by Mobyturns; 30th June 2022 at 01:05 PM. Reason: added "throat plate"
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  5. #4
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    let me clarify..
    I was cutting 'slicing' 2mm pieces and having them fall through the gap between existing plate and blade.
    This is a quick fix, I will admit but its solved a problem.
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  6. #5
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    I don't know if it's a dumb idea or not, but there are already retailers making a buck out of it.
    https://www.timbecon.com.au/fastcap-zero-clearance-tape
    Franklin

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    Default

    edit: wrong thread

  8. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz
    dumb, stupid or great idea ...

    If it works .....

    I did something similar, and stuck a piece of 3mm MDF to the sawbench using double sided tape. It worked very well for a while, and then the MDF warped.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    let me clarify..
    I was cutting 'slicing' 2mm pieces and having them fall through the gap between existing plate and blade.
    This is a quick fix, I will admit but its solved a problem.
    I don't have that problem, nor can I fit a zero clearance insert to my Woodfast TS250 "sliding panel saw." So I'm forced to use sleds for all that work.
    Mobyturns

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobyturns View Post
    I don't have that problem, nor can I fit a zero clearance insert to my Woodfast TS250 "sliding panel saw." So I'm forced to use sleds for all that work.
    I've got a Leda small slider similar (but different) to the TS250. The original insert to the side of the blade has quite a large gap to accommodate blade tilt that left plenty of room for slim offcuts to fall through and jam in the blade shroud. It was pretty easy to make a replacement zero clearance insert from a length of 30mm x 3mm aluminum strap.
    IMG_20220701_180313.jpg
    Franklin

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    wouldnt it be nice doing a survey of peoples ideas and suggestions then building a table saw to suit.
    Hopefully in the next couple of weeks I can cut up some perspex to suit zero
    1 shallow cuts
    1 deep cuts
    1 45*
    etc etc
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    wouldnt it be nice doing a survey of peoples ideas and suggestions then building a table saw to suit.
    Hopefully in the next couple of weeks I can cut up some perspex to suit zero
    1 shallow cuts
    1 deep cuts
    1 45*
    etc etc
    Tony, I've used perspex for router-bases & with all those wood chips & sawdust whizzing over it, it gets a pretty good electrostatic charge up on a dry day, which causes chips & sawdust to cling to it. That probably doesn't matter so much for a TS insert, you are not trying to see through it to the workpiece, but perspex also gets a bit brittle over time. Polycarbonate is said to be stronger & less brittle, but it's not so readily available.

    I've used a number of materials for inserts over the years. The one that came with my current saw had a ridiculously large gap & let BIG pieces through, which sometimes provided me with more excitement than I need. In fact it was downright dangerous if used with a thin-kerf blade. Aluminium is perhaps the most durable of the easier materials we can obtain, but I've used ply (either straight, or with some HMW polythene glued to the surface). Both worked fine, but eventually, sawdust & chips take their toll, especially around the front of the slot and the inserts need replacing every few years. The last couple I made from a plastic cutting-board that was nearly the right depth and proved easy to hand-plane to the required thickness (the shavings picked up charge & clung to everything & it took me longer to clean up than make the insert!

    The insert is retained by a couple of screws, so once the blank is fitted & flush, I remove the riving knife & raise the blade through it, then take the insert out & extend the cut to accommodate the riving knife. You need a separate insert for angled cuts, of course, once you cut the slot for maximum tilt, it's no longer 'zero clearance'.....

    Cheers,
    IW

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    wouldnt it be nice doing a survey of peoples ideas and suggestions then building a table saw to suit.
    ...

    Sounds like that classic cartoon of a kids swing designed by a committee.

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    Default Found It


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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    If it works .....

    I did something similar, and stuck a piece of 3mm MDF to the sawbench using double sided tape. It worked very well for a while, and then the MDF warped.
    Exactly. If it simply works to do what you need, it's a great idea. If it takes a lot of time, trials and effort to force it to work as you want, it's moving into the demesne of dumb ideas.

    If you tell someone about it and they hurt themselves, it was a stupid idea... to tell that person.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skew ChiDAMN!! View Post
    Exactly. If it simply works to do what you need, it's a great idea. If it takes a lot of time, trials and effort to force it to work as you want, it's moving into the demesne of dumb ideas.

    If you tell someone about it and they hurt themselves, it was a stupid idea... to tell that person.
    The more I look at 1970's Aussie made wood working machinery, the more I'm convinced that we have been ripped off by the current offerings.
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