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  1. #1
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    Default Gluing an angled butt joint

    I need to make a boomerang shaped base for a table, as per the attached drawing. I will use Domino floating tenons in the joint, as shown. What is the best way to apply pressure for a joint like this with curved members whilst the glue is drying. The timber will be about 30mm thick, and I would very much prefer not to have any holes in it.
    The drawing shows straight lines, but these could be curved slightly as shown in the right side drawing
    I am open to any ideas and suggestions

    Boomerang base.pdf
    regards,

    Dengy

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  3. #2
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    Do you know the method for taping two thin panels together?

    You could do something similar, except the tenons would make opening/closing the gap to apply glue awkward. I doubt you could 'open' the gap with tape along the joint but perhaps (worth a dry fit and test first?) you could apply some tape along the RH edge, open up, glue, then tape top & bottom when closed. IF you have enough wiggle room in the tenons.


    Personally, I'd probably glue down temporary blocks along top & bottom edges of both faces, laminating brown paper in the the glue line. With careful tightening you should be able to clamp everything together, then once dried pry the blocks off.

    Typically, the brown paper will provide a shear point so the blocks can be removed with a sharp blow from a hammer or careful prying with a chisel or knife. For larger pieces I like to use a knife tapped by a hammer, Hint: don't raid SWMBO's cutlery drawer for this!

    If all goes well (no guarantees!) then it's just a case of sanding away remaining glue/paper from the surfaces.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dengue View Post
    I need to make a boomerang shaped base for a table, as per the attached drawing. I will use Domino floating tenons in the joint, as shown. What is the best way to apply pressure for a joint like this with curved members whilst the glue is drying. The timber will be about 30mm thick, and I would very much prefer not to have any holes in it.
    The drawing shows straight lines, but these could be curved slightly as shown in the right side drawing
    I am open to any ideas and suggestions
    First off, is the "boomerang base" still square or with straight edges? If yes, you can use sloping clamping cauls to apply pressure across the joint. If your cauls have 400 grit paper attached to their faces, they should easily hold without scratching your work.

    If the base is already shaped, you could use Andy's suggestion of a paper joint to temporarily attach glue blocks to the shaped sides so you can clamp directly across the joint. Just make sure that the glued on clamping cauls are shaped to exactly match your boomerang.

    If the "boomerang" is yet to be shaped, probable if you are still in the design stage, glue the joint BEFORE shaping the pieces.

    If you can afford the AUD >$600 "entry price", you could always replace the dominos with Lamello Invis Mx2 connectors. You could then use your battery drill to do them up.


    BTW
    beware of the likely short grain locations within your joint and the legs.

    also,
    where does the table top attach? In your sketch, I can't see any flats for the top to sit on.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  5. #4
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    I think this is what Ian means by sloping clamping cauls. The long arms have fine abrasive paper glued to the inside and are clamped to the two pieces to be glued. Another clamp goes across the faces as shown.
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  6. #5
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    I would attach some cleats to the bench or sheet of ply etc matching the profile but oversized to allow folding wedges to be used to apply the clamping force required

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexS View Post
    I think this is what Ian means by sloping clamping cauls. The long arms have fine abrasive paper glued to the inside and are clamped to the two pieces to be glued. Another clamp goes across the faces as shown.
    Gluing an angled butt joint-img_3600-jpg
    +1 for cauls, just cut them to be the negative profile of the parts you're clamping. Did it all the time at work, but instead of sandpaper, we'd just clamp them to each piece, then clamp across them.


    Also...I've used those Lamello Invis connectors and they're fantastic IF they're lined up. If you don't get them lined up PERFECTLY when you drill them, you're not going to have a fun time. Trust me on this one

  8. #7
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    I rather like the idea of just gluing the cleats directly on to each piece. Then do the glueup and then remove the cleats with a saw and sand the remains away....

  9. #8
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    cut a piece of scrap the width of the legs opening and wedge in there, then just use a band clamp or ratchet strap?

    putting something in the legs/opening just stops its pulling inwards when you apply the force

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    First off, is the "boomerang base" still square or with straight edges? If yes, you can use sloping clamping cauls to apply pressure across the joint. If your cauls have 400 grit paper attached to their faces, they should easily hold without scratching your work. ...
    Probably the best option, if available.

    ... If the base is already shaped, you could use Andy's suggestion of a paper joint to temporarily attach glue blocks to the shaped sides so you can clamp directly across the joint. Just make sure that the glued on clamping cauls are shaped to exactly match your boomerang. ...
    Another approach is to make "plaster cauls". You need two cauls that mold to the shape of the boomerang and which have opposing sides that are papallel to each other.

    The technique is as follows"
    • mix up some plaster of paris and put it into two plastic bags,
    • place bags in caul position and put a piece of MDF against each bag,
    • gently squeeze the MDF together so that the plaster is molded around the boomerang,
    • you will need to nead the plaster to get it where needed; keep the two sheets of MDF parallel to each other,
    • Lightly attach securing clamps, ensure all is aligned, STOP, and allow the plaster to dry,
    • Next day, the plaster will be hardened to form accurate cauls; Do the glue up.


    Boomerang.jpg

  11. #10
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    Apr 2001
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    Perth
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dengue View Post
    I need to make a boomerang shaped base for a table, as per the attached drawing. I will use Domino floating tenons in the joint, as shown. What is the best way to apply pressure for a joint like this with curved members whilst the glue is drying. The timber will be about 30mm thick, and I would very much prefer not to have any holes in it.
    The drawing shows straight lines, but these could be curved slightly as shown in the right side drawing
    I am open to any ideas and suggestions

    Boomerang base.pdf
    Hi Dengy

    Set up the joinery as planned - that is, for the dominos. Add the usual glue (e.g. Titebond 1) to the domino mortices. Now use CA (superglue) on the faces. Press and hold with your hands until the CA glue takes effect. The Titebond will dry and harden in its own time. Strength comes from the dominos.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  12. #11
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    why can't you just rest it on a bench/table... put a clamp on the end.... and just rest a bag of concrete or something heavy over the domino's/glue up?

    Untitled2.jpg

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