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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2

    Smile HELP - cheap hi-strength wood bonding

    Hi - I'm new here and am inexperienced in wood work - I am wanting to build a wooden frame recumbent Trike - 3 wheel pedal bike - look at: http://www.stephenlee.com.au/trike/index.html for my idea. I am looking to built it from pine and plywood. Problem is though: I need a high strength timber adhesive to bond the prices together - BUT, I don't have lot's of money - that's why I am using wood instead of a metal frame (can't weld anyway). So if anyone knows of a high strength and economical adhesive I would really appreciate it. Can anyone tell me about PlastiBond - DOES it bond or is it only a filler? I have only ever used it as a filler. Would it work?
    I will be cross-bolting the frame anyway to limit any lateral movement and keep it together. cheers and thanx
    stephen

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Perth, WA
    Posts
    1,251

    Default

    Epoxy resin is about as strong as you will get. Available from CarbaTec.

    West System Epoxy Resin

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Tin Can Bay, Queensland, Australia
    Age
    69
    Posts
    1,032

    Default

    Stephen

    Welcome to the forum. There's a wealth of information here and you might find info by searching the forum for advice on adhesives. My favorite everyday glue is WeldBond, you'll find it at Bunnings

    Mind you , you'll get many recommendations and I'll stand in line but it's a glue that I've found very useful and durable. If your looking at something that is going to be exposed to a lot of weather then an epoxy is a better alternate. Araldite is a common brand but a two part epoxy is what I'd suggest - there are many names for the same thing.


    Good Luck with your project

    Jamie
    Perhaps it is better to be irresponsible and right, than to be responsible and wrong.
    Winston Churchill

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,767

    Default

    Stephen

    A warm welcome to the forum.

    I second the use of West Systems epoxy. Just make sure you get one that is stable to sunlight if you plan to leave a wood-look finish. Not an issue if you plan to paint.

    Plastibond is a filler, not an adhesive.

    I support your choice of plywood but question the pine. I doubt it is going to be suffiently strong to bear the stresses of a bike. Look at woods such as beech or ash. Others may have suggestions.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Glenhaven, NSW
    Age
    78
    Posts
    1,064

    Default

    Stephen,
    I'm with Derek on this. Leave the pine alone, having had a look at the design, there appears to be the need for some pretty high tensile construction and you will need a tough, springy wood like spruce. If you are short on chips , try getting hold of some old pallets or packing cases from Europe or Japan ( not the crappy hardwood Aussie ones) which seem to be spruce or something like it - very tough and knotty but if you laminate it, you can negate the weak spots due to the knots. You may even find some in the waste bins of your local timberyard, it comes as packing around imported timber, usually a bit bashed but it planes up well. Smile sweetly at the yardman and he will probably give it to you.
    Graeme

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2

    Smile thanx guys

    Thanx for the advice guys - it been of great help. It give sme a much better picture of how to go about this. Again thank you.

    stephen

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Westleigh, Sydney
    Age
    74
    Posts
    9,197

    Default

    Re epoxy glues, I haven't tried West System, but Techniglue, also available from Carbatec, is good. It's a bit thicker than West, and has gap-filling properties. Derek & Graemet are spot on about the timber. Spruce was used (and probably still is) to build wooden framed aircraft.
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