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  1. #16
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    The lid handles were added by a client. Those are "action shots". The ropes were added by request for a few batches

    On the division, let me dig up the plans. I did exact cutouts by using an optimisation program. They were made up so they could be stacked in a sort of space optimised tessellated pallet arrangement, much like beer cartons

    Another option for parts, which I'd do now, is to use a kitchen pre-fab place to do all the cuts for me. MUCH cheaper, especially if you want 10 or 20 of them.


    Edit - as per Potts post below on sizes, I managed to find the two smaller cutlist diagrams for the Small 300x600 and Medium 450x900 chests..... as can be seen, they make for a pretty boring cutting job!

    Somewhere it mentioned wetting MDF before gluing. I really don't think this is a good idea at all! I've always glued directly, with a thin coat on one part, pressed to the other. All cuts are clean of course. Moderate clamping pressure, even using a pinner is fine and a few bricks until it sets (~30 mins). Glue has always been Titebond and its served me well. There are others out there that are specialised for MDF, but only available in massive drums (AV180?).

    300x600small.JPG 450x900medium.JPG

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    The lid handles were added by a client. ...
    Bloody clients !


    ... Another option for parts, which I'd do now, is to use a kitchen pre-fab place to do all the cuts for me. MUCH cheaper, especially if you want 10 or 20 of them.
    Me, too, from a local joinery. They can buy sheet material - MDF, Melamine, plywood, etc - much cheaper than you and me, and their equipment and machinists will cut far more accurately and make (almost) nil errors.
    EDIT: With melamine, I also get them to edgeband. Their margins and Bunnings mark-ups are quite similar.

  4. #18
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    Having worked in the wholesale tool industry for 35 plus years and been involved in countless store shifts, department relays etc I would err on the small size when it comes to your crates, boxes etc, I can assure you a 40 litre crate of tools is bloody heavy, we used to ship in cartons approx 350mm wide by 450 to 500 mm long and 200 to 250mm high. We shipped tools all over Australia.
    Avail yourself of a sack truck or trolley. Keep in mind you will already have a heavy box to start with if you go down the mdf, timber prefab route. My preference would be heavy duty cardboard boxes and good packing tape if you are transporting in an enclosed trailer safe from weather.
    Last edited by Potts; 21st January 2022 at 09:21 PM. Reason: Change of word

  5. #19
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    Thanks WP - amusingly, I've been playing in what looks like exactly the same program for a run of 10 boxes. balancing waste/cost against practicality and simplicity. I think I'm going to go for a basic shape of 500mmx 500mm square, which potentially gives me drawers for the shed IDC, and will fit in any orientation on shelf racking. Currently assessing required transport depth, and that's where I'm at. I may go the cut to size route depending on cost, or I'll do it myself - not an onerous task in MDF. I'm just playing with some test cuts to see iff I can go the 'half/half/half' construction route for the joints - quick and strong. I'll post some pics of progress idc for people to see.

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpdv
    ... I think I'm going to go for a basic shape of 500mm x 500mm square, which potentially gives me drawers for the shed IDC, and will fit in any orientation on shelf racking. ...

    As Potts implies, I would be wary of such a large box size - think of your back.

    I have some stuff in boxes that are 400 x 300 x 200 mm, and that is a good compromise between convenience and luggability. Nevertheless I still have to be careful not to put too much steel stuff in those boxes - they can get very heavy very quickly.

  7. #21
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    One suggestion I would make is IF you go to the trouble of making boxes also consider what storage / racking options that you may have in mind for the new shed. Its all fine optimizing storage boxes for stacking on a pallet but they may not be optimal for storage on say generic or industrial pallet racking.

    I have made a heap of "trays" (310 x 200 x 48 mm) that are the same external dimensions as commercial storage boxes (Fisher) so that they readily fit on 300 mm wide shelving.

    I've also made temp storage boxes for spring clamps out of 4.5 & 6 mm MDF "dunnage" - the packing sheets top and bottom on pallets, that can usually be sourced free from any cabinet shop / warehouse that handles MDF. These were assembled with a fillet in the corners and sides of the bottom using a bit of TBII and some "stitching screws." Not so temp now, seem to be a good permanent solution. Macsim 8G x 16mm Stitch Button Screws Jar - 300 Pack - Bunnings Australia
    Mobyturns

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  8. #22
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    Default Asa Christiana

    Coincidentally, Asa Christiana has a ten page article in Fine Woodworking Magazine's Tools and Shops 2022 edition entitled "Versatile shop cabinets".
    Versatile shop cabinets - FineWoodworking

    This may give you some more ideas on the final destination of your storage/shipping boxes and help you refine their sizing.

  9. #23
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    All really good stuff guys - keep it coming. Yup, I'm tending smaller rather than larger. My issue is the balance between size and modularity/final utility... I have a number of milk crates, and wondered about something that size. On inspection, quite a few tools won't fit comfortably, but I don't want to end up making 'bespoke' stuff if I can help it - the aim is to batch out everything as simply as possible. That FWW link is good, and I'm already thinking about the end goal. I don't want any holes in the end product, given my experience with mud wasps/geckos/mice/rats, so although I like the cost of finger hole pulls, they're out. There's time, so I'm in no rush, and this is all grist to the mill. I have a vision of some stackable 'systainer-like' boxes, with hardwood runners on the external base that keep the mdf out of the floor, and mating runner/handles on the lids that make it stackable, whilst doubling as a handle to lift the lid off.
    I'm not so worried about absolute weight - it's a 'one-off' activity, and given that we'll be struggling with pianos, beds and fridges, a couple of boxes of tools is just more of the same - I'm more concerned that it gives me a useful, modular storage system at the other end...

  10. #24
    Boringgeoff is online now Try not to be late, but never be early.
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    When we relocated 1500km we bought a 20ft container and loaded everything inside. When we arrived here the container was gradually emptied and sold.
    Cheers,
    Geoff.

  11. #25
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    we did the same with container, only our plans went kaput and everything stayed in container 5 + years NOT a good idea. the table saw was brand new still had its protective grease and stuff on. weather changes over 5 years made a mess of the saw.
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  12. #26
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    I wouldn’t overthink it, good quality cardboard boxes will suffice for the shift, stackable, available in various sizes, can be cut down and folded and taped if need be. This then gives you the option of tailor making your storage at the other end when you see what you have to work with.
    Remember every tool company ships product nationally and internationally in cardboard boxes, either inners or outers.
    Last edited by Potts; 24th January 2022 at 12:57 PM. Reason: Added info

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