Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    96

    Default Jointer - Basic Info needed

    I have 3/4" plywood / MDF.
    When I get a cut that's slightly too wide, for example if I'm aiming for 15" but I get 15" & 1/16", can I use a jointer to cut on the edge of the plywood (the 3/4" area) to bring my cut down to 15"?

    Or, do I have to get a jointer that's specifically marked as "jointer/planer?"

    Thanks.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Katoomba NSW
    Posts
    4,495

    Default

    That's not what a jointer is for. You could mark a line and joint down to the line but it is difficult to control the depth of cut and keep it even.
    Just adjust the fence on your table saw and run it through again or move your guide and run the circ saw over it again.
    A jointer is for initial preparation of stock not final dimensioning. You use it to get one face flat and one edge at the desired angle to the flat face.(usually 90)
    You could use a hand plane to trim your workpiece down to size as well. Just take your time and check the size often as you get close.
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    https://autoblastgates.com.au

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Dandenong, Vic
    Posts
    2,029

    Default

    What he said.
    Use a hand plane for 1/16 easier and more than likely more acurate as well.
    Peter

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    96

    Default

    I would, mate...
    But, I'm cutting on the 3/4" side. I won't be able to keep it steady. It'll wobble left to right.

    Any ideas what I can do about this?

    Quote Originally Posted by _fly_ View Post
    What he said.
    Use a hand plane for 1/16 easier and more than likely more acurate as well.
    Peter

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Aww, bummer. Thanks for the info!

    Any idea about my above post, and keeping the planer level/straight?

    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by NCArcher View Post
    That's not what a jointer is for. You could mark a line and joint down to the line but it is difficult to control the depth of cut and keep it even.
    Just adjust the fence on your table saw and run it through again or move your guide and run the circ saw over it again.
    A jointer is for initial preparation of stock not final dimensioning. You use it to get one face flat and one edge at the desired angle to the flat face.(usually 90)
    You could use a hand plane to trim your workpiece down to size as well. Just take your time and check the size often as you get close.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Katoomba NSW
    Posts
    4,495

    Default

    You could use a fence on your plane. Do a google search for Stanley 386 to get an idea of what you need. I have seen planes with holes drilled in the side to screw a fence on.
    Or you could work out a way to clamp it in place.
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    https://autoblastgates.com.au

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Range View, Australia
    Posts
    656

    Default

    A common way of keeping a plane stable when hand planeing an edge is to hang the fingers of both hands onto the work while traveling the length of the cut. This lowers the centre of gravity. Do it a few times and you'll do it every time.
    Cheers, Bill

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    se Melbourne
    Age
    59
    Posts
    2,353

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ball Peen View Post
    A common way of keeping a plane stable when hand planeing an edge is to hang the fingers of both hands onto the work while traveling the length of the cut. This lowers the centre of gravity. Do it a few times and you'll do it every time.
    I was taught to do this, just keep fingers behind the blade.
    Your fingers act as a guide to the plane, and if behind the blade no chance of getting cut.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    65
    Posts
    11,513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icor1031 View Post
    I have 3/4" plywood / MDF.
    When I get a cut that's slightly too wide, for example if I'm aiming for 15" but I get 15" & 1/16", can I use a jointer to cut on the edge of the plywood (the 3/4" area) to bring my cut down to 15"?

    Or, do I have to get a jointer that's specifically marked as "jointer/planer?"

    Thanks.
    how are you cutting your 15" strip
    a table saw
    a track saw
    a circ saw plus home made guide
    ??

    depending on the tool you are using, the 1/16" over width could just be technique
    regards from Canada

    ian

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    65
    Posts
    11,513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Handyjack View Post
    I was taught to do this, just keep fingers behind the blade.
    Your fingers act as a guide to the plane, and if behind the blade no chance of getting cut.
    I think the OP might be using an electric plane
    regards from Canada

    ian

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Range View, Australia
    Posts
    656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    I think the OP might be using an electric plane

    I did say hand plane. Not advisable with a power plane.
    Cheers, Bill

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Range View, Australia
    Posts
    656

    Default

    Incor, I think I understand your problem. You made the cut with a hand held circular saw ? Now you want to trim it to a dimention with a power plane ?

    This is site work, put the panel flat on some stools ( horses) and plane to the line. You will just have to eyeball the power plane square to the edge. Move the planer along the edge a few times with NO power to get a feel for what square feels like. Clamp the work.

    Also seek someone experienced to help. Be safe.
    Last edited by Ball Peen; 10th May 2012 at 07:46 PM. Reason: add. info
    Cheers, Bill

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    96

    Default

    I saw some power planers with a fence. I just assumed the fence wouldn't be enough support to keep it straight.

    But since you suggest it,

    Would a power planer with a fence work well for what I'm doing?

    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by NCArcher View Post
    You could use a fence on your plane. Do a google search for Stanley 386 to get an idea of what you need. I have seen planes with holes drilled in the side to screw a fence on.
    Or you could work out a way to clamp it in place.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    uki
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Hello icor1031,
    the power planer with a fence will do it. You could add a timber face to the fence to make it as large as you need. A router with a straight cut bit and straight edge is another way. Both have the tendency to chip out grain at the end of the cut with ply.
    Tony.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    65
    Posts
    11,513

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icor1031 View Post
    I saw some power planers with a fence. I just assumed the fence wouldn't be enough support to keep it straight.

    But since you suggest it,

    Would a power planer with a fence work well for what I'm doing?

    Thanks.
    not really

    If I understand your need correctly, you are cutting 15" wide strips from a sheet of ply using a hand held circular saw.
    the best way to do this accurately is to use a track saw like this [ame=http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWS520CK-TrackSaw-59-Inch-102-Inch/dp/B001IMEEEM]Amazon.com: DEWALT DWS520CK 6-1/2-Inch 12-AMP TrackSaw Kit with 59-Inch and 102-Inch Track: Home Improvement[/ame]
    but I'm guessing you don't want to outlay the $ to get one -- and I agree they are expensive

    however, you can achieve similar results using your circ saw and a straight plywood guide.
    the long edge of a new sheet of ply straight out of the factory should be straight. Rip off a 12" wide strip and use the factory edge as a straight edge to guide the base plate of your circ saw when cutting subsequent strips.
    with careful measuring you should be able to rip strips with a consistent width -- i.e. without the need to rip oversize and then trim to the exact width required.
    regards from Canada

    ian

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for info re jointer
    By Jerryj in forum JOINTERS, MOULDERS, THICKNESSERS, ETC
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30th Sep 2010, 10:03 PM
  2. Basic Box Making with.... a jointer??
    By BoomerangInfo in forum BOX MAKING
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 21st Mar 2009, 07:10 AM
  3. help needed plz - info needed on turning tools
    By theyoungster in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 7th Aug 2007, 02:31 PM
  4. some basic routing guidance needed - cutting rectangles
    By sramdeen in forum ROUTING FORUM
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 1st Mar 2006, 07:12 PM
  5. Some basic info on working CCA
    By Eastie in forum HINTS & TIPS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28th Feb 2003, 02:27 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •