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  1. #1
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    Default Loose bookshelves

    Thanks for advice in advance. We recently had a cabinet shop build an entertainment/bookshelf unit. 2 pac mdf uprights with 25mm spotted gum veneered ply shelves, 300mm wide. Looks great but poorly assembled so that the leading edge of the shelves can be shifted up and down slightly by hand. The back of the shelves is rock solid. Looks like they just put one screw through the mdf into the side of each shelf about 85mm back from the front of the shelf, no glue. Cab shop is running a mile rather than helping sort it. Any thoughts on how to positively affix the shelf near the leading edge without making it too ugly. The rest is concealed fixing. Working from the top of the shelf, I guess a skewed 40mm bullet head and putty would be one option. Or skew a thin fluted dowel/glue with putty another, although it seems a bit agricultural. Has anyone skewed dowel and successfully cut a plug? I have some spotted gum flooring to cut plugs. Thanks again in advance for sharing your expertise. Shane.

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  3. #2
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    Default

    Throw the book at them Repair, replace, refund | ACCC

    They are legally REQUIRED to fix it.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    Throw the book at them Repair, replace, refund | ACCC

    They are legally REQUIRED to fix it.
    $100,000 later. Only lawyers have won. Fix it yourself, save yourself the angst, heartache and stress!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #4
    Join Date
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    Please post some pictures, they tell 1000 words.
    Now proudly sponsored by Binford Tools. Be sure to check out the Binford 6100 - available now at any good tool retailer.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Australia
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    Default

    Yes, pictures.


    I'm not quite sure what is happening.
    If the back is 'rock solid' I can't see how the front moves?
    I'm guessing there are screws into the back of the shelf? Then 1 on each side near the front?
    I'm also guessing the screw heads are concealed under the paint on the sides. That ought to hold the shelves ok I would have thought. Perhaps the screws just aren't tight.


    Could you work some glue between the end of the shelf and the side, prop it up so it's horizontal. That might be enough.


    Next maybe pocket hole screws from under the shelf into the sides. You can get plugs precut, and I'm sure there is a YouTube vid of someone making skew plugs, so the grain is correct.

    You could just drill straight into the shelf from the side for a new screw and cover the hole with an adhesive cover 'dot' depending on the colour of course.


    Russ

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Scotts Head
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    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfmore View Post
    Thanks for advice in advance. We recently had a cabinet shop build an entertainment/bookshelf unit. 2 pac mdf uprights with 25mm spotted gum veneered ply shelves, 300mm wide. Looks great but poorly assembled so that the leading edge of the shelves can be shifted up and down slightly by hand. The back of the shelves is rock solid. Looks like they just put one screw through the mdf into the side of each shelf about 85mm back from the front of the shelf, no glue. Cab shop is running a mile rather than helping sort it. Any thoughts on how to positively affix the shelf near the leading edge without making it too ugly. The rest is concealed fixing. Working from the top of the shelf, I guess a skewed 40mm bullet head and putty would be one option. Or skew a thin fluted dowel/glue with putty another, although it seems a bit agricultural. Has anyone skewed dowel and successfully cut a plug? I have some spotted gum flooring to cut plugs. Thanks again in advance for sharing your expertise. Shane.
    Thanks for the prompt replies. Not enough time left on the planet to have a stink with 'cabinetmakers'. Just want to fix it and move on. Haven't worked out the photo thing yet but will keep trying. Designed the thing with 2 pac gable sides to cover fixings so can't fix direct. Plenty of fixing through the back but seems only one screw through the sides 85mm back from the front. Not a lot of gap at the sides to squeeze in glue. Maybe best to fix from the top as shelves go well above eyeline. The bookshelf bays will allow drill access but not sure how much room I need for pocket hole jig. Thank you all for helping. Shane.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    N.W. Melb Suburb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfmore View Post
    Not a lot of gap at the sides to squeeze in glue.
    Have a look at Chairdoctor glue from Timbecon or Carbatec.
    If you have access to a couple of hypodermic syringes, you might be able to squeeze in some diluted glue which would be similar to Chairdoctor.
    Tom

    "It's good enough" is low aim

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