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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
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    3

    Default mortise and tenon

    Hi all,
    Well I'm fairly new to the woodworking scene, but am wanting to work out the best way to cut mortise and tenon joints. I'm trying to decide on either buying a jig for a router (saw one on carbatec), or buying a mortiser ($299 from carbatec) and having to cut the tenons on a mitre saw (don't own a tablesaw yet).

    If someone can give advise on the best and most resonably priced way to do this, that'd be great. Whether to buy a jig (if so which are recommended) or are there any other ways?

    Any tips you'd like to give aswell are much appreciated.

    p.s if this is in the wrong part of the forum, please move it.
    cheers

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Yangebup, Perth
    Posts
    416

    Default

    If you are in Carbatec, have a look in the book section, there are some great books on woodworking for beginners that will show you haow to do them easily by hand. You will get some great hand tools for the same price as a morticer and a saw. This is how I started and haven't looked back.
    The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,622

    Default

    If you only have a small number to produce you could also use a mortice chisel a hammer and a tenon saw

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Vevey, Switzerland
    Posts
    406

    Default

    There are literally hundreds of ways of making mortise and tenon joints, depending on the tools you have and personal preference.

    I think the mortiser is more for people who make a lot of them, or already have a well equipped workshop - certainly not one of the first things to buy.

    I agree with the others that you should start by learning to make them with hand tools. But another option is to use a router. There are many designs for shop made jigs for both the mortise and tenon. Or you can use a router table.
    Cheers, Glen

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Rosetta, South Africa
    Posts
    180

    Default

    How you do it depends on quantity.
    One or two - do by hand.
    Today I did 364 tenons for dining room chairs.
    Tomorrow will do 364 mortises.
    I have a Leigh FMT and it just keeps producing perfect joints and
    has paid for itself over and over.
    Doing something like that by hand would be madness.
    Not to mention time consuming.

    Phil

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,556

    Default

    Phil

    Hoe gaan dit?

    Doing it by hand is only madness if you have 364 to do!

    On the other hand, if you only have a couple, doing it by hand makes a lot of sense.

    Here is a tutorial on using hand tools: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furnitu...ndMortice.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Rosetta, South Africa
    Posts
    180

    Default

    [QUOTE=derekcohen;1378575]Phil
    Hoe gaan dit?/QUOTE]
    Kak in hierdie land. Corruption supreme. Als is vrot.
    Jammer ek is te out om te PFP.
    Thanks for the tutorial but as said fine for a few.
    Phil

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Bathurst NSW
    Age
    78
    Posts
    530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    If you only have a small number to produce you could also use a mortice chisel a hammer and a tenon saw

    Nought like the original, way to go!

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Albury Well Just Outside
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    13,303

    Default

    I like the idea of doing them by hand, and only a few up to 20 at a time.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Munruben, Qld
    Age
    79
    Posts
    10,028

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    Good learning experience to do it by hand if you haven't got too many to do.
    Reality is no background music.
    Cheers John

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Westleigh, Sydney
    Age
    74
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    9,103

    Default

    I've just done 16 sets by hand, through tenons are 100mm long x 75mm wide. If I was doing them often enough I'd get a morticer, but usually I'm doing much smaller and fewer.
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