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  1. #1
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    Default Pilot hole size for screws

    This is a dumb question but I would like to know what pilot hole sizes you guys are using for different drill sizes? Say 6G, 8G and 10G. Does it change between hardwoods/softwoods/particleboard/MDF?

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  3. #2
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    I just measure the shank with my dial callipers and drill that size. Same for all woods.

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    Thanks guys.

    I'm looking at self tapping screws online. What is the difference between 14G-10 and 14G-20?

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    About 10

    Sorry, I'll see myself out...

  7. #6
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    For wood screws I use this reference guide: Wood Screw Pilot Hole Size Table - Engineer's Handbook

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by qwertyu View Post
    Thanks guys.

    I'm looking at self tapping screws online. What is the difference between 14G-10 and 14G-20?
    Screw Size Identification The description of the size of the screw is usually listed as three figures:

    1. The first figure indicates the gauge of the screw (g),
    2. The second figure indicates the threads per inch (T.P.I.),
    3. The third figure indicates the length of the screw - mm or inches (”).

    e.g. 14-10 x 20mm = 14 gauge, 10 threads per inch, 20mm in length.

    Often the second figure is not listed, particularly in timber screws, etc., e.g: 10 x 2-1/2” = 10 gauge, 2-1/2 inches in length.

    From page 3.004 - https://www.hvaceducationaustralia.c...ew%20Types.pdf
    Mobyturns

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  9. #8
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    I see.
    If they dont list the second figure - is there a standard TPI which we assume it is?

  10. #9
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    OK. If you are talking about true "Wood" screws, then a tapered bit should be used. The bit would be specified by the drill bit manufacturer according to the diameter of the screw.

    If you are talking about sheet rock screws or sheet metal screws (non tapered threads) like we all use, it is a bit more complicated.

    There are two diameters of the screw that are important, shank and thread. The easiest way to determine the appropriate screw size is to hold the screw up to a light area with the drill bit behind it. The pilot drill bit should be hidden behind the screw including both sides of the threads. The body drill would not stick out beyond the threads of the screw.

    Food for thought department.
    You are using a screw to hold two pieces together, the top and the bottom. The threads of the screw should pass through the top piece freely and only engage the bottom piece.
    Rich

    When SWMBO said "I won't cook in metric."
    The metric system died in the US.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrich View Post
    Food for thought department.
    You are using a screw to hold two pieces together, the top and the bottom. The threads of the screw should pass through the top piece freely and only engage the bottom piece.
    Second course:
    drill through both pieces together with the pilot first before enlarging the top hole, so that both holes line up.

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    For me, pilot hole size varies with the timber density. The pilot hole I use in Ironbark is larger than in pine and different again in MDF
    If they were the same size hole you would find one screw stripping the hole and the other screw snapping off with different timbers

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    Hey Qwertyu, going on the basis that a picture is worth a thousand words - I found this video some time ago, and it seemed to cover most aspects of this (that I didn't know)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ne69SeQ1b7w

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beardy View Post
    For me, pilot hole size varies with the timber density. The pilot hole I use in Ironbark is larger than in pine and different again in MDF
    If they were the same size hole you would find one screw stripping the hole and the other screw snapping off with different timbers
    Agreed, same as metal screws have a smaller thread than wood screws due to density of the product. Same principle, aluminium screws have a lager thread than ones for steel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rrich View Post
    .......Food for thought department.
    You are using a screw to hold two pieces together, the top and the bottom. The threads of the screw should pass through the top piece freely and only engage the bottom piece.
    Indeed, so how come it's so damned difficult to find wood screws that are not threaded all the way to the head, these days? And when I do at last locate some 'real' wood screws on the racks at my local Big Green Shed, there are only two or three sizes and none in the gauge or length I'm after.....

    Cheers,
    IW

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Indeed, so how come it's so damned difficult to find wood screws that are not threaded all the way to the head, these days? And when I do at last locate some 'real' wood screws on the racks at my local Big Green Shed, there are only two or three sizes and none in the gauge or length I'm after.....

    Cheers,
    Ah, the wonderful benefits of competition and a global market!
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