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  1. #1
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    Default planning layouts

    When I get to the point of wanting a cabinet or something (usually) for the shed, I scrounge through offcuts and make do with whats there.
    Now getting adventurous and starting to make from full sheets ply, I work out my measurements and then start cutting often forgetting extra for joining etc.

    I watch people on YT cutting down from a full sheet, how do they work this out without stuffups or mistakes, what are the tricks or things to remember..

    Yes someone is going to suggest sketchup or some other computer program is that the only option.... himmells
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

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  3. #2
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    Default

    The trick is a pencil . Simple and true .

    At its most simple you do a drawing of what you want . Say the front view of a set of workshop shelves 1 meter high x 850 wide.

    It doesn't have to be to scale , a freehand sketch .

    You write down next to it any overhangs like a top . Work out Moulding sizes .Timber thickness . Joinery type . Then you calculate each part and write a list known as the cutting list . Triple check a couple of different ways and then go start cutting wood.

    The drawing doesn't have to be super accurate. Its the conversion of all the details to an accurate cutting list and the checking over that no mistakes have been made that gets you there in the end .

    A better drawing to scale with a front and side elevation and a plan view is the next step . That'll give you better detail and something that you can present to some one else for consideration . At its most simple this is just done with a flat board , a T square , a pencil and a set square and a scale ruler. 1:5 and 1:10 will do . And a Rubber.

  4. #3
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    Default

    Depending on the job at hand a drawing is always a good start and I like to use a "Story Rod" to workout details of spacing different parts and how they will fit with others. A story rod could be as simple as a 2" X 1" length of a light coloured timber you mark on the timber in actual size (not scaling) of what you are doing and you can use the story rod to mark on your parts, information necessary to get the job cut and assembled. You would be surprised just how how often you refer back to it as you progress.
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  5. #4
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    What I have found many times is that a drawing may give you an "over al" view of the job at hand some intersections of other parts may not be able to be sorted out with just the drawing. The story rod will come to the recue every time. Mainly because you are in 1:1 scaling. I some times will use a small off cut of the material I would be using and sit them on the story rod to "simulate" a shelf or what ever. I does make your brain work a little less hard
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Sunshine Coast, QLD
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    Default

    When you have your cutting list based on the info given by offer members, the next step would be to workout how you are going to get the parts out of your full sheet of ply while at the same time minimising waste. So draw the parts (full size) on your ply starting with the largest parts first (sometimes you may have offcuts left over from another project which you can get the smaller parts from) remembering to allow for the thickness of your saw blade.

  7. #6
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    If it's not bleedingly obvious, I use an on-line cut list optimiser.
    You enter your stock size and then the sizes of the various pieces and it works it out for you.
    eg CutList Optimizer
    Most will have allowances for kerf thickness etc.

    There are heaps of them out there and I'd be interested to know what others use.

  8. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    If it's not bleedingly obvious, I use an on-line cut list optimiser.
    You enter your stock size and then the sizes of the various pieces and it works it out for you.
    eg CutList Optimizer
    Most will have allowances for kerf thickness etc.

    There are heaps of them out there and I'd be interested to know what others use.
    My CNC comes with nesting built into the software, so I can print out and use that for the panel saw, or just cut out the parts with the CNC

    However TonyZ, is looking more for none PC methods

  9. #8
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    Default

    I reckon a great project for the hobby woodworker would be to build a drawing set up.

    I use one of these for my work but it has to be used in daylight hours.

    IMG_5848.JPG

    I made a quick build set up for doing drawings inside at night until my office and library get re assembled .

    IMG_5854.JPG IMG_5843.JPG IMG_5846.JPG IMG_5853.JPG

    The T square is hardwood . The two set squares are Masonite painted white . And the rest is mostly Birch Plywood. The drawer holds paper, set squares , rubber , scale ruler and push lead pencil . I can do all the same drawings on that but its a bit slower than the drawing board with its "Machine" as they call them .


    Lady rings up and wants bedside tables . I draw three versions . She says yes to these . I cut wood, polish and deliver.
    IMG_5412 (2).jpg IMG_5512a.jpg

    Get some paper and play it simple at first and you can very quickly design and draw everything from hand planes to shed or Garden landscape design.

    Of course the Computer does it faster and better these days . I still think pencil and paper has a place for fast design of a lot of stuff. And there is the ease of showing older clients that are always impressed seeing it done the old way.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Camelot View Post
    My CNC comes with nesting built into the software, so I can print out and use that for the panel saw, or just cut out the parts with the CNC

    However TonyZ, is looking more for none PC methods
    I saw he mentioned Sketchup and I assumed he was referring to PC software or apps and I can understand where he's coming from - he doesn't want to learn a whole new app with a whole new set of menus and submenus.

    The online optimisers I referred to are an absolute doddle to use.
    Enter your required sizes, your stock sizes, and kerf and press go - what could be easier?

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    When I get to the point of wanting a cabinet or something (usually) for the shed, I scrounge through offcuts and make do with whats there.
    Now getting adventurous and starting to make from full sheets ply, I work out my measurements and then start cutting often forgetting extra for joining etc.

    I watch people on YT cutting down from a full sheet, how do they work this out without stuffups or mistakes, what are the tricks or things to remember..

    Yes someone is going to suggest sketchup or some other computer program is that the only option.... himmells
    Measure twice, cut once.

    And only show the successes on camera.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  12. #11
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    Default

    thank you all for great ideas, however the prize goes to BobL CutList Optimizer that looks like it will suit me, I seem to get an idea of what I want and then it gets all cluttered up with bits n pieces.
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    27,406

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyz View Post
    thank you all for great ideas, however the prize goes to BobL CutList Optimizer that looks like it will suit me, I seem to get an idea of what I want and then it gets all cluttered up with bits n pieces.
    Thanks Tony, if you have a hankering its worth looking at other cut list optimisers - some are better than others. I use then mainly for small metal work and plastic projects.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Default

    When it comes to cabinets a simple drawing, cut list and cut order will go a long way. Nothing worse than making all your cuts to a particular width, moving fence for a different cut only to realise you have to make another cut at the previous dimension.

  15. #14
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    Apr 2019
    Location
    NSW
    Age
    36
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    880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    If it's not bleedingly obvious, I use an on-line cut list optimiser.
    You enter your stock size and then the sizes of the various pieces and it works it out for you.
    eg CutList Optimizer
    Most will have allowances for kerf thickness etc.

    There are heaps of them out there and I'd be interested to know what others use.
    I think I ended up paying for it but it was a program called 1D cutting optimiser. I can't remember why I got it (claimed it on my rental property tax), as I've only used it a hand full of times.



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