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  1. #1
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    May 2003
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    Default Preserving tools for long storage

    I have about 100 or so high quality carving tools which I need to put away in the garage for Storage for 2 years or so. They wonít be accessed in that time and my main concern is I donít want to pull them out one day and find them rusted.

    I normally keep them in white canvas tool rolls. These would stain quite badly with some products but I can take them out and store them loose in a box if that is better. I could also make a sealed crate for them if that helps.

    The garage they will be stored in is not particularly dry in prolonged wet weather, and is about 20 meters from the water.

    Can anyone suggest how I should store these? Some sort of anti-rust wipe on product perhaps?

    I know this question has been asked many times before but I want to capture latest thinking and products.

    Cheers
    Arron
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sunbury, Vic
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    Default

    My initial thought would be to coat them in Vaseline which would be easy to apply and later wipe off. Relatively cheap also but others will probably have better ideas.
    Tom

    "It's good enough" is low aim

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    South Australia
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    Default

    Simple but reliable, make sure they are clean and dry, (alcohol wipes) give them a heavy coat of grease,(really heavy) some thing like motor vehicle bearing grease wrap them in thick brown paper
    then wrap them in a cloth, I have known this method to last at least 8 years

  5. #4
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    May 2003
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    Central Coast, NSW
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    Default

    Yeah, sorry, I should have mentioned I don’t want brown stains on the handles, which are mostly ash or hornbeam. The last few mms closest to the blade will often get its finish worn off, and the ash is especially prone to soaking up impurities.

    Sorry
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    25,622

    Default

    Warm a pot of wax until it melts and dip the metal bits in the melted wax - hang up to dry. If a bit of wax gets onto the wood it won't matter as it will act like a preservative/polish.

    There are also various removable plastic dips out there that will do the same thing that are a bit more robust than wax.

    You could also look at leaving them uncoated and storing them in an airtight container (eg Sealed plastic drum) along with a few packs of desiccant.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Oberon, NSW
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    61
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    12,997

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Simple but reliable, make sure they are clean and dry, (alcohol wipes) give them a heavy coat of grease,(really heavy) some thing like motor vehicle bearing grease wrap them in thick brown paper
    then wrap them in a cloth, I have known this method to last at least 8 years
    Grease & brown paper... absolutely awesome for preserving metal, although it can be a right PITA when it comes time to clean up. Especially if several decades have passed rather than years. (Scrounging spare parts for my bike I've come across a few that'd been 'preserved' since the 1940-50.)

    'Tis not a good solution for anything with timber, cloth or rubber parts though. [shudder]
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

  8. #7
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    Jun 2010
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    Bundaberg
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    Give the blades a wipe with WD40 or similar, wrap everything in cloth to cover sharp edges and vacuum seal them. Domestic vacuum sealers are cheap as chips these days and the rolls of bag material are available in widths from 12cm to 28cm. I even once used one to hold a 24Ē rip saw blade I was de-rusting with Evaporust
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sth Gippsland Vic
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    Default

    Inox is what you want . A shipwright friend working for the Australian Navy told us a great story of how they tested and used it on some guns accidentally submerged in salt water .

    https://www.ebay.com.au/i/2224329917...waAhrfEALw_wcB

    Inox on the tool wrapped in rags lightly sprayed in it and sealed in Boxes .


    s-l640.jpg

    Well made wooden boxes would be nice . The condition of tools kept in well kept tool chests that Ive seen is pretty impressive . Quality Plastic boxes are good if you can get reasonably long lasting ones .

  10. #9
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    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    Inox is what you want . A shipwright friend working for the Australian Navy told us a great story of how they tested and used it on some guns accidentally submerged in salt water . WD 40 is a proven water attractant . It sends things rusty . Great for quick lube loosening things up . Useless for rust prevention
    WD40 is the civilian alternative to PX24; it is used to preserve the gas turbines in both warshipís main propulsion systems and all embarked aircraft. Itís sprayed through while spinning the turbine by itís starter motor and is good for 6 months withe the intakes and funnels covered by big tarps, or 1 month with them open. Donít forget this is in a salt water environment also. If we ever ran out of PX24, DW40 was the approved alternative available worldwide.

    I wonít say INOX isnít better because I donít really use it much, but NATO doesnít stock it in the inventory....
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Sth Gippsland Vic
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    Default

    I removed my comment before you posted .

    I was spraying my lathe beds with WD40 and they kept rusting up . They were exposed to mist being under a lean too with no walls . Inox worked WD 40 didnt .

    That and all the negative Hygroscopic talk about WD on the internet had me believing in Inox . I went searching , Looks to me like a WD blitz to clear the negative talk has been launched to try and cover it has happened . Its still there but deep under positive talk about WD40 .

    I Edit again What your saying is WD40 a good lube . I still buy it and use it for that . I like it .

    And its a water displacement solution. It must work at that too . But when it dries off the rust goes nuts . Inox is better at holding off the rust and better at not drying off .

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Parkside - South Australia
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    3,244

    Default Preserving tools for long storage

    Not sure if it is still the case or not but I thought that WD40 contains silicone which has been known to cause issues with some finishes being applied to the end project.

    Seemed to be discouraged when it was discussed lubing lathes and the like. Might have similar issues with high end carving tools. From what I understand Inox is silicone free.
    Now proudly sponsored by Binford Tools. Be sure to check out the Binford 6100 - available now at any good tool retailer.

  13. #12
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    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
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    6,951

    Default

    Cover the blades in grease or oil and wrap in Glad Wrap would be my approach. If I had no regard for the handles I would toss them in a bucket of oil. Perhaps remove the handles and that could be done.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Hervey Bay
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    123

    Default

    renaissance wax is what I use.
    Living in Cairns this was the only thing that kept the rust at bay also it's not messy. Seems pricey but a can lasts for years as you only need a tiny bit.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Sydney
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    Default

    How about shellac?
    Make up a brew but don’t thin it, just dip your tools in it and leave them to dry.
    When you want to use them just clean off with metho.
    Ive used paint on car engine parts for long term storage but I don’t think you’d want to use that.
    I left my kit at my mothers place for a few years in the 70s, she was about 50 foot from the water at Woy Woy.
    It was very hard on my gouges and chisels, even my contraction rules rusted.
    The main problem was a few items of brass and possibly some Al stuff, it set up a reaction.
    The garage didn’t do the Velo much good either but it had been dead for the past 25 years and has remained so up in my roof beams since.
    H.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,080

    Default G15 Corrosion inhibitor

    This stuff is supposed to be the bees Knees.

    G15 Corrosion Inhibitor - 400ml | Tools & Machinery Maintenance - Carbatec

    Originally developed for industry; G15 is a soft film long term rust preventative that's designed to be used on all types of metal to create an almost impenetrable moisture barrier.

    This makes it the perfect product to keep your tools and machinery rust free if they are to be unused and stored for long periods of time.

    It has been proven to withstand exposure to sunlight as well as salt spray; making it perfect for your tools if you live near the coast. G5 is not an oil; but a thixotropic gel; it sprays as a liquid and then solidifies as a film.

    It's also non-staining and won't dry out and can be used inside machinery as well as on metal surfaces
    Kudos to Mr Brush for putting me onto this. I recently received some gear from him and one would never guess it had been so treated. Not greasy, oily, staining or felt like it was dipped in plastic.

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