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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Brisbane
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    Default sawdust burning stove

    Some recent discussions with exador have raised my interest in sawdust burning heater devices.
    I've googled around a bit But the link I'm looking for illudes me.

    I think it was here that someone posted a link to a site that discussed the matter and showed plans for such a burner.

    the method of operation was that you placed a pipe down the middle of the stove and rammed sawdust, chips and othe stuff round the outside and pulled the pipe out & the fire burned up the middle of the pack.

    anybody got this or a similar link to hand.

    cheers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sendai / Japan
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    22

    Default Sawdust burner/heater

    Fine Woodworking Issue 59 July/August 1986
    Page 8 (Methods of work)
    There is a half page article complete with diagram, on just what you are looking for.
    It's 200 litre drum lifted off the floor by bricks.
    There is a 100 mm metal pipe that goes all the way through a hole in the bottom.
    The saw dust and chips are packed down tight and a layer of sand or ashes is layed as a topping.
    The pipe is removed and a lid is fitted with a flue or chimney.
    The saw dust is lit from the bottom and buy controlling the amount of air that can enter the bottom (through cracks in the brick spacing) the combustion is controled.
    Quote; "A full drum will heat our 3,500 sq ft North Carolina shop for eight hours with no attention. Since we are burning kiln dried wood chips, the flue gasses are clean and combustion is complete. When the stove is going strong no smoke comes from our chimney- only clear hot gas."

  4. #3
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    Aug 2006
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    Sendai / Japan
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    22

    Default Gary

    Sorry . Forgot to sign off.
    Gary

  5. #4
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    Apr 2002
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    Brisbane
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    Default

    Thanks garry I have that issue , will look it up.
    There was another web link too.
    cheeers
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
    Age
    61
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    12,980

    Default

    You mean this one?
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

  7. #6
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    Location
    Brisbane
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    Default

    yep that looks ver much like the one.
    cheers
    certainly interested in any others.
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.
    Abrasives can be just as dangerous as a blade.....and 10 times more painfull.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
    Age
    61
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    12,980

    Default

    I built one and it worked very well, until last summer (or was it the one before?) when I bought a DC and converted it into a seperator.

    I miss it on these cold mornings.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Michigan USA
    Posts
    2

    Default sawdust furnace

    Greetings from the USA

    I have been mucking around with an idea for about 6 years and have finally made it work very nicely. I would be interested in talking with someone who would be interested in making this thing on a comercial opportunity.

    My furnace uses no electricity to operate. It is best used if the sawdust has 5%-40% by weight moisture content. 30 mins after ignition there is 1800F (982C for you Aussies) temp with the draft air door fully open coming from the heat exchanger. There is 700F ( 371C) flue temp 16" from the base of the flue. So I am very cleanly burning what is considered harzardous waste (US Standards) cleanly and very efficiently. There can be some development of the electrical controlls for this furnace. However it needs no fans to make the aspiration happen. This can be used as a multi building hotwater heating unit.

    If any one is interested in this situation feel free to email me.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Deloraine Tasmania
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    Default

    I think its a great idea using what would have been waste to heat the workshop. I've got the same link printed out & plan to build 1 this summer ready for next winter.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Michigan USA
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    Default

    The way the air circulates through this furnace is critical to making it work. the density of the sawdust is problematic in solving this heat source. I am not certain of the plans you speak of........

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
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    3,260

    Default

    Hi Soundman

    I just put sawdust, shavings, etc in large paper bags and burn it in the Kent slow combustion heater in our living room. Works fine.

    Cheers

    Graeme

    PS - - - KISS

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Deloraine Tasmania
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    Default

    Norb i'm refering to the link that Skew put up, post 5. not exactly plans but enough info to do the job.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Adelaide
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    639

    Default

    That link that Skew put up at #5 doesn't appear to be working anymore
    ____________________________________________
    BrettC

  15. #14
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    Default

    Heres a PDF that seams to be the same pages plus a few.

  16. #15
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    Oberon, NSW
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    Default

    Thanks for that, Rattrap. It has been added to my collection.

    Oddly enough, both versions are exactly the same except for the attributions... mine was a VITA (Volunteers In Technical Assistance) bulletin and the PDF is US Forestries, both released in 1974.

    It looks like the author, Jeff Waretluft, got a bit of decent distribution. Luckily for us, now that the VITA one has bitten the dust!
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

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