Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Thumbs down I swear there's something wrong with this iron

    Okay, probably not, but ... it's only been a recurring problem with my Luban No. 5.

    Re-ground the primary on the electric bench grinder, then half an hour going through three wetstones (mostly because I didn't get quite on 25 on the grinder so had to remove a lot with the 300 grit with the Mk II), back in the plane, then test it out - it's sharp right along the cambered blade, but has three nicks in it that couldn't possibly have survived the bench grinder, which means I made them while sharpening the blade.

    This keeps happening. It's only my No. 5 so nicks aren't life or death but it's bloody annoying.

    Any over-heating on the bench grinder should make the steel softer not more brittle so I don't know what's going on.

    Sorry, no photos, it's a bit hard to take decent photos of something that small.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    6,951

    Default

    The blade may need grinding back a bit a few because of poor heat treatment. Hollow grind the blade then instead of trying to hone the hollow bevel on the stones place the bevel down on the first stone and slightly lift the blade so the heel of the bevel no longer contacts the stone and put a small micro bevel on the cutting edge only, proceed to the next stone & repeat until you have finished honing. It normally only takes a half a dozen swipes on each stone to et a razor sharp edge and touching up when it gets blunt is a quick exercise as well. From grinding the blade to final honing should take less than five minutes when you get used to it and it also negates the need for setting angles in jigs etc.

    Derek Cohen gives some illustration and advice on this technique here. I like it because it takes literally only a few short minutes to go from nicked blade to back to work.

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...gStrategy.html

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Default

    I suspect I need to spend more time truing my grinding wheel - I suspect it's getting nicked from high spots on the wheel - the fact that things often go bouncing off the table from vibration is giving me a clue that there's an opportunity for improvement there - so I've just got one of those T-shape diamond dressers and going to see what that does, spend more time balancing the wheel and seeing if I can replace the plastic bushings with steel ones, and also planning to restore an old hand-cranked grinder I just got off Gumtree.

    Anyone know if we can get the Geiger Solution's Tru N Dress diamond point grinding wheel truing jig here in Australia? Though I'm guessing it'd be close to $200 ...

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas, USA
    Posts
    3,070

    Default

    Be very careful, your grinding wheel may be failing. Check it thoroughly for cracks, chips or nicks. Mr. Dodds, HS welding teacher, told us that grinders were the second most dangerous shop machine.
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Default

    It's a brand new aluminium oxide wheel so shouldn't be failing; I wasn't familiar with the concept of truing grinding wheels till recently.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas, USA
    Posts
    3,070

    Default

    Grinder shouldn't be hopping around. If you've used the new wheel under those conditions please have a look. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaoVqUpOrPs
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Caroline Springs, VIC
    Posts
    1,637

    Default

    You need to dress Alox wheels often. If it is a white, blue, pink alox wheel, you can see as you use it not only does it lose its shape, but dark grey bits begin to fill the surface. This dark grey stuff is steel grindings. Eventually you end up rubbing rather than grinding. Before you put a new wheel on a grinder, loosely hold it with one finger and give it a soft, and I do mean soft soft soft, tap with something metal...I use a spanner, not a hammer because I'm used to hitting hard with a hammer (even a soft hit with a hammer is still pretty damn hard). The sound it makes when you hit should be a clear ring, rather than a dead thud. If it is a thud, it means the grinding wheel has a hairline crack in it and should be discarded. But I doubt this is the problem.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Thanks I'll do that too. I've just been using one of those carborundum sticks till now. When I say "Brand new" well, 6 months but used infrequently.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rob streeper View Post
    Grinder shouldn't be hopping around
    No no, grinder is bolted to bench. I mean vibration is causing things on the bench like angle gauge etc to fall off the bench.

    Also, that video is gruesome. But sobering.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Thornton NSW
    Posts
    456

    Default

    If it's only happening with the one blade, repeatedly, then replace it. Those Luban blades cost what, $20? I know it's a poor tradesman who blames the tools, but sometimes it really is the tool's fault.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    6,951

    Default

    Fix the grinder problem but first the wheel dresser for $200, if the grinder is powerful enough you can buy a CBN wheel for close to that and never have to dress it.

    https://www.cwsonline.com.au/shop/ca...rinding-wheels

    Buying the CBN wheel will not necessarily fix the vibration, that is more likely down the the grinder itself but it is fixable. The cheap Asian grinders have poorly made shafts and nuts which when tightened push the wheel off centre and even making steel bushes for the wheel lessens it but does not eliminate it altogether, been there and done that already so I am speaking from experience. Whichever way you choose to go with the wheel you need a matching set of these self aligning washers between the nut and the wheel, they are simply magic



    The washers Self Aligning Washers | Jergens Inc

    What type of sharpening you do will dictate the type of CBN wheel to buy if you choose to go that way, rounded edges for wood turners and flat wheels for flat iron sharpening so keep that in mind. If you keep the wheels you have buy the washers and watch the problem disappear if the wheels are properly dressed. McJings have perfectly good wheel dressers for a few dollars if you need to buy one.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Thanks Chris, never heard of CBN wheels. Will look into it, although I use my bench grinder for all sorts of things so don't want to put something on it that means it's not all-purpose, though I'm forever switching wheels, different grits and diameters, wire wheel, stitched rag, hard felt etc. It's a decent machine IMO, Abbott & Ashby.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    4,179

    Default

    I have a 200mm Abbot and Ashby I bought about 3 years ago. Runs as smooth as silk. I have a tin of water, for cooling, on the same base and you can barely see a ripple. It replaced an AEG unit I had for all of 10 minutes - I couldn't fit a wire wheel with the guards on and it rattled the shed windows. I'm also looking at acquiring a CBN wheel for it.

Similar Threads

  1. Wrong wood? Wrong glue? or bit of both.
    By orraloon in forum HAND TOOLS - UNPOWERED
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 5th May 2017, 08:36 PM
  2. Insert your own swear word
    By Reno RSS Feed in forum GENERAL ODDS N SODS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2nd Feb 2016, 05:20 PM
  3. Next time you hurt your self it's OK to swear
    By Phil Spencer in forum NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH WOODWORK
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 14th Jul 2009, 07:30 PM
  4. Talk about wrong place at the wrong time....
    By silentC in forum NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH WOODWORK
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 25th Oct 2005, 11:51 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •