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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Molendinar, QLD
    Age
    47
    Posts
    299

    Smile

    http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pro...stockCode=W454

    Just seen this one on the Hare & Forbes web site. With the optional sliding table attachment it still comes in under budget. Would this be suitable for handling 1.2 x 2.4 panels? Any thoughts welcome.

    Cheers,
    Paul

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Bendigo Victoria
    Age
    75
    Posts
    16,561

    Default

    The capacity of those rails is the same as on my TS10L, so you will be able to cut a 2400x1200 in half on that using the fence.

    However, there is always an however, handling a 2400x1200 sheet by yourself and getting an accurate cut is another matter.

    That is why I have my cutting table and ProGrip, as referred to above, to break down a 2400x1200 panel in to manageable pieces.
    So, even with my Triton Sliding Table, I never put a full sheet on it, I just can't handle it on my own. It wouldn't matter whether I had a panel saw or what, it is beyond me to handle a full sheet by myself.

    I also filled in the space between the rails, see here. You can see my cutting table in the background in the first photo. It gets used for all sorts of things, assembly, painting of nest boxes, you name it. When not in usee, it hangs on the wall.

    BTW, that looks like a good deal on that saw.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Festool are a great saw and leave a neat cut, a panel saw would be even better, but why drop that much money on it. Go to capral or any aluminium place and get some rectangular section, 80x30x3mm was about $110 last buy,and use it as a straight edge with a nice sharp blade in a high sided saw.I've ripped thousands of rips this way and always end up with perfect cuts.Using a rip guide can sometimes leave a slight bowing through the sheets with multiple cuts.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Mt Crosby, Brisbane
    Posts
    2,302

    Default

    http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pro...tockCode=XWW02

    Probably too big but H&F could get it shipped up for you and it's under $5k. Don't know anything about panel saws so others here could offer opinions on suitability. 2c
    I'm just a startled bunny in the headlights of life. L.J. Young.
    We live in a free country. We have freedom of choice. You can choose to agree with me, or you can choose to be wrong.
    Wait! No one told you your government was a sitcom?

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Carine WA
    Age
    70
    Posts
    679

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jefferson View Post
    I've read all of this with interest.

    Can I politely say that those against panel saws clearly don't have one?
    As a "new" owner of a panel saw I could not agree more

    Unless you live in a fully renovated and fully furnished palace, the first thing you need is a panel saw. You can cut melamine, veneered panels etc, not only for yourself but for all the neighbors and relatives. Take my word for it, once you have a panel saw, you will never be short on jobs. Even kitchens, pantries, storage cabinets..... The list goes on. Freebies, that's the main problem.

    And yes, I do have a panel saw of sorts, a Minimax CU 300 Smart Combo that I've had for 6 or more years.

    I also have two table saws, plus a bandsaw, so I know what gets used the most.

    Of course, I'd prefer to be working in solid timber all the time. But the reality is that manufactured board reigns supreme on the home-building front.

    And, if you really push it, possibly on the solid timber front as well. I can glue, rip and cross-cut a table top in no time on the panel saw. Time me and check for accuracy against any jig / Festool sytem.

    Comes down to money, but the value you add to your home and shed with cabinets cut on a panel saw takes some beating.

    IMHO of course.

    Jeff
    Hi All

    Apologies for resurrecting such an old thread (found it while searching for panel saw info), but having recently gained (due to extensive renovation/extension) a small double garage and the need to fit out a kitchen, alfresco and manufacture several cabinets/entertainment units, I invested in a panel saw.

    I already possess a table saw and circular saws (no guide rail other then a length of 25 x 75 aluminium angle).

    I was quoted $8000 for a set of kitchen cabinets. These were made to size etc to fit the desired kitchen layout. This $8000 deal was for a flatpack supply of all components for me to assemble.

    While I concede that all the solutions/suggestions proposed do have merit, there are some drawbacks to these alternative options that place the panel saw way ahead for all timber cutting, especially sheet goods.

    References to the ability/inability to handle a full size sheet applies equally to some extent to all the proposed solutions. Yes, manoeuvring a 2400 x 1200 sheet is not the easiest task, it's not really too hard on a panel saw.

    As a decent panel saw is quite heavy (mine weighs 700+kg) so it can easily handle the weight of a panel leaning against it. So you only need to tilt the panel on to the saw. Yes I know it could be easier working with the panel on the floor, but all the talk about sawhorses or other options etc still requires handling the panel. When the panel is on the saw, moving around to position the panel for sizing cuts is SO easy. Built in stops and the rip fence do their jobs well.

    So the panel saw I bought second hand is a Lazzari Juno 3000. It can handle 3m panels with ease. Sure, it take up A LOT of space. It more or less fills the small double garage. The saw is positioned with the end of the sliding table just inside the workshop roller door, this allows the sliding table to accept full size panels and rip the full length (I can rip 3m long).

    There is 2.5m between the blade and the workshop wall so I can crosscut full length 2400mm panels (the saw's crosscut capacity is 3130 but of course I don't have that much room ) ).

    As stated by others, the convenience of the sliding table is GREAT! I find it VERY useful for cutting and trimming ANY timber, not just sheet goods. Want to square an edge on a 3m length of 100 x 50, NO PROBLEM. Want to straighten an edge on a timber slab, NO PROBLEM. Want to crosscut that same slab, square at both ends, spin the slab on the table. Do the spin three times and you have square and parallel sided table in less than five minutes - no fiddling with guides or tape measures etc. Just as useful on glued up panels!

    Surprisingly, there was NO chipout of the laminate when I ripped the full length using ONLY the rip blade

    I paid $700 for the Lazzari, plus $260 for some new outrigger support rollers. I also purchased two 350mm diameter blades a crosscut/laminate blade and a rip blade plus a new scoring blade. I have a 100mm cutting depth. (BTW I also had to invest in a 3ph outlet)

    So, is the panel saw a tight fit in the workshop? Absolutely!
    Was it worth the money paid? Absolutely!
    Do I regret my purchase? Not for an instant!
    Would I sell it to regain my workshop floor space (when all my cabinetry is complete)? NEVER!
    Is it better than the table saw? Absolutely!
    Do I use the panel saw for cutting almost everything? Absolutely!

    The 8hp main motor allows the blade to rip through Jarrah like a knife through butter (the scoring blade is driven by a 1.5hp motor). The sliding table makes the handling of timber on the saw a simple task.

    Most of the time I remove the outrigger and have a huge capacity sliding table saw - smoooooth!!

    I can cut a 3m tapered cut without jigs, just clamp the timber to the sliding table and gently push...

    Tapered posts for a four poster bed anyone? (Can be 100mm square any taper angle you like).

    When time permits, I intend to fit my Incra Mitre 1000SE mitre gauge. The mitre bar is just a little too wide for the slot in the sliding table.

    Then I'll have a huge and MORE CONVENIENT version of Incra's mitre sled...

    p_miterexpress_main_zoom.jpg

    So for my 2 cents worth, if you have the space and the budget a panel saw is DEFINITELY the way to go.
    Kind Regards

    Peter

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