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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Default Can you wash belt sander belts ?

    I've always wondered. Sometimes, for one reason or another, I will destroy a reasonably new belt, by using it on a particularly oily timber or finish that clogs it so quickly that not even my thong can pull it out.

    Have you ever saved all these clogged belts and chucked them in a bucket of something special that brings them back to new ? I could see that maybe that would work. But don't know what that something special would be

    cheers big ears

    Jake

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  3. #2
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    Jan 2013
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    Default

    Hi Jake
    The Hermes sandpaper seems really waterproof(maybe you use that). If your thong doesn't fix it why dontchya take the belt to one of those high pressure cleaners at a car wash. Or even the garden hose if you have good pressure in your water.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Perth
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    Default

    If its melted and resolidified plastic paint then you will need a paint striper. If thong doesn't work I try PVC conduit as this gets out some stuff than thong doesn't.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    blue mountains
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    Default

    Dust extraction goes a very long way in preventing cloging. As for washing well give it a go as there is nothing to loose.
    Regards
    John

  6. #5
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    May 2012
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    Canberra
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    Default

    I had a brand new belt clag in seconds with a sappy pine. Super happy plus 10.

    The Big Eraser didn't move it so I sprayed it with the CMT blade cleaner I use for the table saw. Let it do it's magic for a bit....

    Off it came with a blat of the eraser! Huzzah!

  7. #6
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    Default

    The other thing I found helps sometimes is reversing the belt and then try cleaning it.

  8. #7
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    Default

    thanks for the suggestions. ta.

    I haven't tried any of those ideas before. I'll try the PVC pipe idea first…. since it'll be the cheapest/easiest attempt. Give the thong a mate.

    and if that doesn't work I'll try the other ideas…...go from there. thanks guys.

  9. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    The other thing I found helps sometimes is reversing the belt and then try cleaning it.
    Have tried that one though….

    still like the idea of building up say a dozern clogged belts over a few years then stick them in some kinda wonder clean detergent ….sit them over night….pull them out sparkling like in the ads….then just peg them on the cloths line to dry, brand new.

    Its the fine grit belts that clog up fastest eh.

  10. #9
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    Feb 2006
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    Perth
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    Default

    If its wood resin, then caffeine is a good softener for wood resin.
    Seriously - I've even tried soaking resin covered chainsaw chains in strong coffee and it does work
    Caustic also works but it might also play havoc with the fabric.

  11. #10
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    Default The Belts.

    Hi All,
    Some time ago, I was told, when you put a New Belt on, first thing you do is to clean it with the Grissle Rubber Block, 30 x 30 x 200mm. & then when in use, clean them regularly, even as you are working with them.
    To clean those 1220 x 150mm. belts, the High Pressure Washer is the best I know of.
    Regards,
    issatree.
    Have Lathe, Wood Travel.

  12. #11
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    Default

    thanks.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Perth WA
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    Default

    I fire up the air compressor and turn the pressure up to 600psi or more. Depending on how much time spent and the build up in the grit, the air blasts them resonable clean.
    Experienced in removing the tree from the furniture

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod1949 View Post
    I fire up the air compressor and turn the pressure up to 600psi or more. Depending on how much time spent and the build up in the grit, the air blasts them resonable clean.
    600psi ????
    Chris
    ========================================

    Life isn't always fair

    ....................but it's better than the alternative.

  15. #14
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    Default

    Yep a bit high... lets try 60 then.
    Experienced in removing the tree from the furniture

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    McBride BC Canada
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    Default

    My observations are based only upon wood workers, hiking stick makers, who may be sanding for 30 days in a row! A month to do 50 or more hiking sticks in a batch. They change sanding drums, etc about once a year.

    They taught me.

    Your probable error is that you waited far, far too long as the belt jammed up. You pushed it, the friction went up and you cooked it.

    As soon as the belt/drum colors up, time for the crepe rubber stick to clean it.
    The minute that you push harder = the friction goes up, the heat goes up and you cooked it.

    I like to use abalone shell inlay in many of my wood carvings. I cut and carve those pieces with stones and sanding drums. Shell dust is far worse than wood dust to bung up an abrasive.

    But, just as soon as a stone/drum goes white, kiss it a few times with the crepe rubber and keep carving.

    Without that, I would not and could not afford to include shell and slate stone inlay in my carvings. Each simple 1" eye in a Raven would have cost me $200 - 300 in stones and drums.

    Possibly $2 per year?

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