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  1. #271
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    Mar 2009
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    Default WIP - Maloof inspired rocker

    I managed to squeeze in a bit of time today to fit another back slat. I'm getting quicker at these but I find them mind numbing to make, so I stopped after one. One day this week I'll get in the shop, put some tunes on and just get them done. They're holding up the build.

    I've seen other sculpted chairs use bent laminated back slats which I really like. The tenons sit in an oval shaped hole and the slats flex when you seat in the chair. I might try this next time.

    I then moved on to finishing the rocker form. It consists of three pieces of 15mm form ply screwed together, with a piece of cork wrapped in packing tape to avoid glue sticking.
    I'm using a strip of huon pine in the rockers which was gifted to me from Fletty, but I'm not sure how about thick I want the huon to be. I might use my drum sander to remove a little bit of material at a time, then clamp it up in the form and see how it looks.

    IMG_3141.JPG

    IMG_3162.JPG

    IMG_3148.JPG

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  3. #272
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    Mar 2009
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    Sydney
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    Default WIP - Maloof inspired rocker

    For anyone who was curious about the laminated slats I was talking about yesterday, here is a few pictures. They are obviously thinner than the ones I'm making, and I prefer how they look.
    I'd love to build a couple of these chairs next year.

    IMG_3171.jpg

    IMG_3173.JPG

    IMG_3170.jpg

  4. #273
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Doreen, Victoria
    Age
    16
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    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by groeneaj View Post
    For anyone who was curious about the laminated slats I was talking about yesterday, here is a few pictures. They are obviously thinner than the ones I'm making, and I prefer how they look.
    I'd love to build a couple of these chairs next year.

    IMG_3171.jpg

    IMG_3173.JPG

    IMG_3170.jpg
    I like your version more [emoji6]

  5. #274
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Katoomba NSW
    Posts
    4,522

    Default

    Yeah, I think i prefer the hand carved ones as well. The laminated ones look a bit too "Ikea"
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    https://autoblastgates.com.au

  6. #275
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    75
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    10,189

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    Just a matter of what appeals to your individual taste...

    I think I prefer the thicker slats myself, but I'm probably influenced by my own chair-related experiences. Back splats & spindles ae the weak points in chair superstructure. I've lost count of the number of broken spindles I've repaired over the years, & so often it's been just a single spindle, at or near the centre of the chair back. Many of the broken spindles I've seen have had no obvious defects, so it's hard to see why it would have failed from normal use. I can only surmise that sometimes the full weight of a sitter bears on a single point.

    Sawn slats like you are using need much care in selection of material grain orientation if they are going to have a long & happy life (as you've already discovered!). Maloof went to great pains to ensure his chair designs were robust. I remember reading way back that he literally dropped one of his early chairs from a second-story window to test it (it survived). The re-curved slats on your chair need to be fairly bulky to accommodate the inevitable grain run-out when cut from solid stock. The secondary shaping gives them a much 'lighter' look, but the curves need to remain fairly modest to avoid too much cross-grain occurring. If you want to go for really lean, flowing lines, I think the safest approach by far would be to cold-form them from multiple thin laminates. If done with supreme care, using strips cut from the same piece, the laminations can almost disappear, but the tighter the curves, the more 'slippage' there'll be between successive strips, so the lamination inevitably becomes more obvious on a more pronounced curve. Or you could turn a handicap into a feature & deliberately add another contrasting strip or two in the mix, as you plan to do with the rocker strips. Depends on what you prefer - the beauty of practicality or the beauty of a solid chunk of wood.....

    Cheers
    IW

  7. #276
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    75
    Posts
    10,189

    Default

    Just a matter of what appeals to your individual taste...

    I think I prefer the thicker slats myself, but I'm probably influenced by my own chair-related experiences. Back splats & spindles ae the weak points in chair superstructure. I've lost count of the number of broken spindles I've repaired over the years, & so often it's been just a single spindle, at or near the centre of the chair back. Many of the broken spindles I've seen have had no obvious defects, so it's hard to see why it would have failed from normal use. I can only surmise that sometimes the full weight of a sitter bears on a single point.

    Sawn slats like you are using need much care in selection of material grain orientation if they are going to have a long & happy life (as you've already discovered!). Maloof went to great pains to ensure his chair designs were robust. I remember reading way back that he literally dropped one of his early chairs from a second-story window to test it (it survived). The re-curved slats on your chair need to be fairly bulky to accommodate the inevitable grain run-out when cut from solid stock. The secondary shaping gives them a much 'lighter' look, but the curves need to remain fairly modest to avoid too much cross-grain occurring. If you want to go for really lean, flowing lines, I think the safest approach by far would be to cold-form them from multiple thin laminates. If done with supreme care, using strips cut from the same piece, the laminations can almost disappear, but the tighter the curves, the more 'slippage' there'll be between successive strips, so the lamination inevitably becomes more obvious on a more pronounced curve. Or you could turn a handicap into a feature & deliberately add another contrasting strip or two in the mix, as you plan to do with the rocker strips. Depends on what you prefer - the beauty of practicality or the beauty of a solid chunk of wood.....

    Cheers
    IW

  8. #277
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sydney
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    2,513

    Default WIP - Maloof inspired rocker

    I certainly do like the slats that I'm making. I just need to ensure they don't look too bulky, and that they are in proportion with the rest of the chair.

    Whenever I make something I always look at alternatives and how I'd make it again next time. The bent laminated slats in my opinion look really nice on the armless dining chair, but I can see them looking a bit thin for a rocker. I suppose it comes down to how you sculpt the chair.

  9. #278
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    Mar 2009
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    Default WIP - Maloof inspired rocker

    Alright, Iím sort of back working on the rocker and need some advice.

    I somehow managed to screw up the negative part of my form (top section in this old photo). Iím now planning on drilling some holes in the bottom section of the form to fit a bunch of F clamps which will give me direct clamping pressure. It seems like a pretty straight forward operation, but was wondering if I should know anything before proceeding?

    The glue Iím using is titebond 3, I did a fair bit of research on glues for bent lamination and in the end settled on what Maloof used. I figured if itís good enough for him, itís good enough for me.


    IMG_3149.JPG

  10. #279
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    Nov 2003
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    Sydney
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    51
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    8,799

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    Its looking good Andy
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  11. #280
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    North of the coathanger, Sydney
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    what can go wrong?
    regards
    Nick
    veni, vidi,
    tornavi
    Without wood it's just ...

  12. #281
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    Jan 2009
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    Brisbane
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    My only thought is to make sure the two holes are perpendicular to the curve. Most combination squares come with a “V” attachment which can find that. Mark out on one side then carry the line across to he other side of the jig .
    There ain't no devil, it's just god when he's drunk!!

    Tom Waits

  13. #282
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    brisbane
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    81

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    congratulations on testing yourself,I am particularly interested in the maloof joint, also is it only the rocker he has plans for or does he have them for other maloof chairs? cheers

  14. #283
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Camden, NSW
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    71
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    3,575

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    Quote Originally Posted by groeneaj View Post

    I've seen other sculpted chairs use bent laminated back slats which I really like. The tenons sit in an oval shaped hole and the slats flex when you seat in the chair. I might try this next time.
    I cheated and used my Domino to create the mounting holes for the back slats on my (non Maloof) chairs. From memory I used the 10 mm cutter and the widest setting which gave a 10 x 28 deeply bored clean hole.
    a rock is an obsolete tool ......... until you donít have a hammer!

  15. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by brit View Post
    congratulations on testing yourself,I am particularly interested in the maloof joint, also is it only the rocker he has plans for or does he have them for other maloof chairs? cheers

    I used two whiteside router bits for the maloof joint that are sold specifically for this. It really isnít that hard, just use a scrap piece to dial in the fit.

    If you go on Charles Brock website you can see all the plans he sells. From memory he has plans for dining chairs and a low back chair. Although they are based off maloofs work, they are not exact copies.

  16. #285
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    4,179

    Default

    Brit. I machined some corner maloof joints with a standard rebate router bit and a table saw. As groeneaj said, you just dial it in with some scrap.

    E0A9FC26-27E3-4171-9318-0A50C3797A0B.jpg

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