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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3

    Arrow Wood Carving tools + Wood Advice needed BAD

    Hi all.
    firstly my idea. I want to carve some Tikis for the door knobs of my car, and have never really done any woodworking to speak of (except school) and I was wondering what the best wood and tools would be to use.

    The tikis ideally would be about 4-5cm high, and round, maybe 1-2cm in diameter. I tried carving some out of dowl and it seemed way too hard with the crappy tools i had, using old vinyl/cork tools (??) and I couldn't get accurate sharp edges.
    This was my first try, which I painted and re-sanded, its a bit rough
    tiki door knob link

    I would like some advice on what sort of tools I'd need, at a reasonable price, and where I could get some ($$$??) i live in melbourne, and then an idea on the best kind of wood for finer detail and accuracy that this obviously needs.

    any help would be much appreciated, thanks in anticipation.
    Simon

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakleigh East, Sunny Vic
    Posts
    628

    Default tools

    Hi Tiki,
    I think it's hard to go past Flexcut tools for the fine work you are doing.
    They have a range of carving knives and palm chisels that are razor sharp -literally. I have bled for my art!!
    I bought a small roll of 11 blades and one handle for about $110, I think.
    There is also a smaller set, as well as individual pieces. I bought mine from Carbatec.
    A V-gouge is essential.

    My brother, however, prefers to use his electric dremel tool and does it well.
    He makes dust, I make chips.
    Hope this is some help.
    Cheers,
    Steck

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Broome West Aussie
    Age
    64
    Posts
    3,683

    Default

    Tiki... I second the Flexicut stuff bloody brilliant gear... ahem literally! :eek: Dont ask

    I got the flexicut carving jack and mate its a bobby dazzler... mmm must take some pics and update that review I did awhile back eh? its handy size, a good weight, excellent hand fit and control while the blades come blindingly sharp and are easily honed on the provided honing gear do not try to carve desert timber! the point of the knife blade does not do well in rocktimber!! dont ask needless to say my knife blade no longer has a pointy tip ... fits in your pocket or make a belt holder just like a normal pocket knife only a little bit larger... all in all a bloody good investment and the beauty is you can take it with you and do your carvin anywhere

    Timber? Id certainly go Huon Pine for starters as its light, easily worked, smells flamin awesome as its worked and ends up looking stunning (note on this DO NOT let any loose red stuff drip onto Huon Pine!!! dont let it happen and dont ask , Im damned if I think of any green colored timbers to use but you could dye them... ahem by the by the link didnt work for me

    Oh... and when working HP do keep your hands fingers and tools spotless! the stuff seems to attract dirt stains and marks which unless you spend eons sanding to rid the finished item of them will mar the work... dont ask :mad:... I now use those thin cotton gloves luthiers use whenever handling HP

    Carbetec has them.
    Believe me there IS life beyond marriage!!! Relax breathe and smile learn to laugh again from the heart so it reaches the eyes!!


  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Bulleen, Melbs
    Age
    39
    Posts
    171

    Default

    I grew up using hand chisels and have only recently bought myself a Dremel rotary tool. I still do a lot of my carving by hand.

    When your working by hand your cutting at a slower pace which means yourve got a lot more time to make decisions about the shape your carving.
    I often find that the grain of the wood dictates the way it ends up.
    I use a lot of razor blades too. Those safety scraper blades are fantastic all round tools.Other sorts of razor blades are good too. If you use them properly, they can give you nice fine lines

    I also recommend Huon pine for finer work. It takes some nice detail, although you do have to worry about not scratching it while working.
    Theres two of my Huon pieces here:
    http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com...ad.php?t=32707

    ben
    Art has now be-come
    Sim-ply an ex-cuse to sit
    In the Sun . What Fun!
    BC-haiku

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    .
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    10,487

    Default

    Check the date of the thread guys..

    Al

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    5,215

    Default

    :d :d :d

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Garvoc VIC AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    11,469

    Default

    So its started again!!!
    Regards, Bob Thomas

    www.wombatsawmill.com

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    queensland
    Age
    74
    Posts
    1,069

    Default

    I saw the date.
    Wild dingo,when you use Huon Pine do you find that little insects are attracted to the wood.It happens at my place.every time I cut Huon Pine these insects seem to come from nowhere.
    Huon is not a favorite for me , prefer White Beech or Tassie Myrtle, very nice timbers to carve.
    Regards Terry

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakleigh East, Sunny Vic
    Posts
    628

    Default

    doh!
    Cheers,
    Steck

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