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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    This afternoon I taught myself to mig aluminium. The key was finding the right volts, wire feed, stick out, speed and watching the heat build up, that had me stumped for a bit, wondered why each successive run was worse than the last - heat build up!. Oh, a steady hand also helps, but that's beyond this old codger now, hence the wobbly runs. Excellent penetration too, after welding an external edge joint, I ground it down flat then belted the hell out of it trying to separate the joint. Not too bad for an hour or so practice. A whole new world of aluminium fabricating has opened up now, should have taught myself to weld aluminium year's ago. Talk about messy though, splatter everywhere. And I burnt the crap out of my arm from flash, the flash is 10 times brighter than when welding steel.
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  3. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    doubled up post.

  4. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

    Default Getting there.

    Coming together slowly, still a lot to do, should be finished in around another 20 years at this current pace.
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  5. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    Finally decided to attach the side panels via rubber grommets inserted in the rear of the panels over the ally bungs I turned up and attached to the frame down tubes. They'll be attached to the front of the battery carrier. This gives space for pods or velocity stacks. I did try forming the panels with more acute angles, but didn't like the look.
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  6. #50
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    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    Welded up the battery carrier and made a security strap today. Reg/rect is mounted on a plate behind the battery carrier, solenoid is mounted underneath the carrier. Battery carrier is 3mm aluminium as is the the strap and reg/rect mount. Battery sits on an aluminium/rubber Sandwich. Front of the carrier is seen, so will be polished, remainder will be a blasted finish. Carrier sits on rubber grommets in the bracket I welded to the frame. Front mounts are bent up from 3mm steel and welded to 22mm tubes. Rubber mounts are inserted in the 22mm round tube. Still have to weld on some mounts for mounting side panels to.
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  7. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    Polished the front of the battery box and the side cover, rest of the box was bead blasted. Just a rough job, but I wanted to see what it would look like on the bike. Not liking it so far, so I think I'll be making a steel box and painting the side panels black. I'll wait until the pods arrive though so I can see what the whole setup looks like together.
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  8. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    Finished both side panels, battery carrier, battery strap and mounted the reg/rect and solenoid. Very neat so far. Battery carrier is mounted in rubber as are the side panels. Took a bit of doing but eventually I got the side panels to mirror each other.
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  9. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    Here's a selection of positive stop grommet nuts. Whenever mounting anything in rubber it's important to ensure the grommet is compressed the ideal amount, too much and the rubber will distort and eventually destruct. Too little and the mounted item will move and vibrate, negating the effect of rubber mounting and also eventually destruct. Not a new idea, the Japanese have been using it for years on their bikes. Particularly helpful when mounting things on bikes prone to vibration, 360 degree twins are a good example. In this selection I turned up on the lathe, the bullet headed one on the right is thread for bolting to a frame tab, used for mounting side panels, the grommet in the side panel just slips over the bullet head in a tightish fit, the front of the panel has two grommets secured by grommet bushes and allen head bolts. Next one is a threaded, positive stop, through nut I used for a similar purpose. The third is a grommet bush with a 6mm through hole, this one is used for mounting the seat. The bush is mounted in the grommet in the seat and an allen head screw passes through the bush and threads into a tab welded to the frame. The last is a grommet bush with a 6mm through hole, turned up from delrin. This one is used for mounting the aluminium battery carrier I welded up. As the battery poles are very close to the side of the carrier, I didn't want it shorting out if a nut, spanner, or whatever, made contact between the battery pole and the carrier, the Delrin bush isolates the carrier from the frame, so if the positive battery pole is shorted across to the carrier, it won't result in the battery shorting out.
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  10. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Sandstone Swamps ,Ningi ,Qld.
    Age
    71
    Posts
    106

    Default Attention to detail

    Brilliant job , you are a very talented person.

  11. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    I bough a twin outlet coil for a CB750 for use on the TX, unfortunately it won't fit where the original coils were so I fabricated a mount and mounted it up where the flicker indicator relay normally sits. This necessitated turning the coil on it's side, so the plug leads follow different paths to the plugs, a bit untidy, but I think I can live with that. Rather than have the points lead snaking all over the place, I drilled a hole in the top of the points backing dish and took the wire straight up to the coil. I did originally make a coil mount that bolted to the horn bracket mount, the coil residing between the front down tubes, but that looked very untidy. For now, the coil is out of sight under the tank, looking much tidier. Shame about the plug leads following different paths and angles, but, you can't have everything. You'll notice I even polished the plug caps. Getting down to the nutty gritties now.
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  12. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    Re furbished a couple of ignition switches today, one is two position the other is single position. Unfortunately, the M4 threads in the bakelite surround were stripped, so I had to drill them out and re tap to 5mm, I also had to turn down the heads of the 5mm countersunk screws so they'd fit in the existing aluminium back clamp. The bakelite is in pretty rough condition: two big gouges and numerous scratches. So, I chucked it on the lathe and turned down the outer surface as much as I could, but the damage is still visible. I then soldered a bridge across a couple of terminals on the back of the switch and soldered another wire for feed on another terminal. That gives me one live feed in and two out.. The other switch is a two position, it's in better condition than the other, but open to the weather due to the open back design. The switch will be mounted on the right rear engine mount, so I've opted to go with the single position bakelite switch, which is better weather proofed than the other. The two out feeds and single position suit the electrics I've designed for the bike anyway.
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  13. #57
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    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    And this is where it goes. Made the bracket for it this morning and mounted it, complete with grommet where the wires exit. I'll replace the philips heads with allen heads later. No philips head screws will ever reside on any bike I build, hate, hate, vomit. The position of the switch by the battery allows two less wires going up the spine of the bike.
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  14. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    500

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    Regulator/rectifier plate done with a couple of panel mount, blade fuse holders on the side. Only need the one, but if I change my mind later on, I have two, plus I can add another two underneath the existing ones if I'm so inclined. The random orbital sander gives a nice finish on aluminium.
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  15. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    500

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    I've been scratching my head on how to join a few cables under the seat. first option was a few twin bullet connectors, but I thought that was a bit untidy, so came up with this idea: A few bits of Delrin machined up to take a piece of all thread, a couple of nuts, a couple of Delrin washers and a couple of dome nuts, which I'll later replace with nylon domes. This setup allows several cables to be joined and insulated, negating any accidental short circuits. In reality, it'll only join three, maybe four, cables. I call it 'attention to detail'...
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  16. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    500

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    A couple of surface finishing ideas. The plastic guard under the seat of the TX650 was in terrible condition: badly scarred, and gouged, much like the rest of the bike. I was going to bin it and either make an ally one or buy a new one, but, being a bit tight with resurrection money, i did a little experimenting. First I hit the plastic guard with a polishing mop, that didn't work at all. Next I tried a nylon fibre wheel, even worse. Next I tried a scotch brite wheel, uh, uh as well. So , as a last resort I tried scrubbing it down with some fine sandpaper, got tired of that real quick, so put some fine paper on the random orbital sander and it didn't come up too bad. Then I had a brain wave, chucked it in the blasting cabinet and blasted it with glass beads. It came out in a matt finish, not shiny as per the original, but pretty darn good. A lot of the scratches and gouges are simply too deep, but once smoothed over with the sander and then blasted with glass beads it comes up pretty good, good enough to reuse as a hidden part anyway..

    Second finish is a random orbital sander on ally, this gives a really, really nice, even finish which can be clear lacquered afterward to retain the finish, Bead blasting and then hitting it with clear lacquer also gives a nice finish, but not as good as the random orbital sander. As well as a nice looking finish it also provides a good base for painting with clear lacquer. Although, it is only workable on flat surfaces, trying to get an even pattern on something like an engine side cover would be impossible. Perhaps bead blasting and paintinng with clear lacquer would look alright, but, I'm addicted to polished side covers so that's out for me. Anyway some pictures: first picture is of the plastic inner guard, don't have any before shots, but trust me, the guard was in disgusting condition. Second pic is of ally finished with a random orbital sander. So, if you're like me and balk at spending a million bucks on resurrecting a 47 year old motorbike, give these two ideas a shot, you will be surprised.
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