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  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    I used to work in the same building as a Jag wrecker and I was talking to him one day about E Types and their reputation. He had bought one some time before and quickly sold it because he reckoned it did not handle well, his description of it s handling was a bit more forthright than that and it did not impress him as a good car to drive at all.
    Is that comparing a 50 year car to a new car? Also Holden or Ford of that era had drum brakes & leaf springs so do not even come close. A E Type pushed can have interesting handling but that can be tuned/corrected easily.

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  3. #47
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    My memory is that the E-Type first made it's appearance in Dec 1959 and was available to the general public the following year. Based on the D-Type sports racing car, which itself was a trend setter, it was ahead of it's time. Yes,compared to modern vehicles it handles poorly on skinny tyres. Jaguar had also pulled a swifty in that the first car released to "Motor" magazine for a road test had been tweaked so it did achieve the magical 150mph, and people waxed lyrical. That was also in the 3.8L version (actually 3781cc). No E-Type straight out of the showroom ever did that again until the advent of the twelve cylinder models even in 4.2L guise (4232cc). In fact the convertible versions with their poorer streamlining were lucky to reach 120mph.

    Nevertheless, it was good value for money at the time and none of the foregoing prevented the car reaching cult status and being successful in commercial terms.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  4. #48
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    Dec 2011
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    Deception Bay Qld
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    1960 Fb Holden my first the poor thing.
    1968 Mazda 1500 Chick magnet
    1957 FE Holden Island car only for weekends
    1962 EK Holden wagon
    1971 Xy Falcon PV Wrote her off on the Bowls club corner when a guy i had been drinking with down the the pub ran into me going home a different way.
    1969 Cortina Mk2
    1976 LH Torana Probably our best car for over 15years
    1974 XB Falcon Wagon
    1969 S2 Landrover SWB Miss it badly should have kept it.
    1970 XW Falcon wagon Good car should have restored it but didn't.
    1990? VN Berlina A honest car just hoodliner and paint fade fixes.
    2004 WH Statesman Mica Red great looking car but didn't like driving it.
    2005 Nissan narvara.
    2006 Nissan Maxima still have it great car.
    2003 Falcon RTV ute My dump truck need to sell it.
    2003 Landrover Disco D2a TD5 It's a joy to drive, but i am getting to old to maintain it so it could be replaced by a new Holden Trailblazer

    Plus 4 bikes and 3 12ton trucks.

    That's all I think.

  5. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete57 View Post
    Is that comparing a 50 year car to a new car? Also Holden or Ford of that era had drum brakes & leaf springs so do not even come close. A E Type pushed can have interesting handling but that can be tuned/corrected easily.
    No, the conversation took place about 35 years ago so modern cars then were still heaps of rubbish and the E type was still held in high regard by most. He had been involved in buying and selling Jags and parts for many years so had a good knowledge of them. It took me by surprise TTTT, I had been in the spare parts side of Leyland/JRA for about ten years at that stage and never heard anyone express the same opinion.
    CHRIS

  6. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Jaguar had also pulled a swifty in that the first car released to "Motor" magazine for a road test had been tweaked so it did achieve the magical 150mph, and people waxed lyrical. That was also in the 3.8L version (actually 3781cc). No E-Type straight out of the showroom ever did that again until the advent of the twelve cylinder models even in 4.2L guise (4232cc). In fact the convertible versions with their poorer streamlining were lucky to reach 120mph.
    Must admit I am biased having owned a 3.8 E Type convertible. Plus have driven mates E Types.
    The V12 actually has the lowest top speed of any E Types. They are quicker off the mark than a 6 cylinder but the 6 will pull away as the speed increases toward 100mph (based on mates trying to drag off each other - so real life).
    A 3.8 convertible may not get to 150mph from the showroom but easily get past 120mph and more. They get close to 120 in 3rd gear. I have done it too times to count. Lucky there were not as many radars when I owned mine. A 3.8 that can only do 120mph has issues.

  7. #51
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    They must have had super tall gearing to get to 150mph with 4 gears, my S2000 needs 6 gears and a 9k redline to go that fast...

  8. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    They must have had super tall gearing to get to 150mph with 4 gears, my S2000 needs 6 gears and a 9k redline to go that fast...
    Elan

    They were super torquey. The E-Type could go from 20mph to top speed in 4th. As to actual speeds the vehicles did, I think you have to bear in mind that the speedometers of that era were designed by advertising executives and very optimistic. I can only go by the road testing that took place from magazines of the day. The first E-Type tested did exactly 150mph (timed two way run) and the first of the V12s did 154mph. Remember my earlier comments about the tweaking?

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  9. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Elan

    They were super torquey. The E-Type could go from 20mph to top speed in 4th. As to actual speeds the vehicles did, I think you have to bear in mind that the speedometers of that era were designed by advertising executives and very optimistic. I can only go by the road testing that took place from magazines of the day. The first E-Type tested did exactly 150mph (timed two way run) and the first of the V12s did 154mph. Remember my earlier comments about the tweaking?

    Regards
    Paul
    They were available with an electric switched overdrive as were most Pommy sportscars of the same era and a lot of sedans as well which allowed a low diff ratio to be run and still get good acceleration (for the time) and a good top speed. The main problem with motors of those days was the low RPM limits due to lousy engineering and even worse oils both of which we do not have to deal with today. it would not surprise me to find the first car had a lower diff ratio and an OD fitted.

    The Japanese led the charge to better engineering and the oil companies had to up their game to keep up with the better quality motors, Honda did a 50cc motor cycle engine that had something like 18 gears and went to 22,000 RPM and if it dropped 50 RPM the rider went down a gear! It is now rather strange to see how the Europeans have re-taken the engineering lead and Japan has fallen behind in a lot of stuff.
    CHRIS

  10. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    It is now rather strange to see how the Europeans have re-taken the engineering lead and Japan has fallen behind in a lot of stuff.
    Not sure that's an entirely fair assessment, they have just mostly shifted from performance to economy.

    The new Civic Type R has been consistently reviewed as the best of its class against its European counterparts and Honda managed to all but eliminate torque-steer in a FWD pushing well over 200kw. Toyota has shown off the world's first CVT which integrates a physical 1st gear to allow good take-off while keeping the CVT part more efficient. Mazda has been doing all sorts of fuel economy magic with SkyActiv and the Japanese and Koreans are still the only countries to have mass-market hydrogen cars on offer.

  11. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    Not sure that's an entirely fair assessment, they have just mostly shifted from performance to economy.

    The new Civic Type R has been consistently reviewed as the best of its class against its European counterparts and Honda managed to all but eliminate torque-steer in a FWD pushing well over 200kw. Toyota has shown off the world's first CVT which integrates a physical 1st gear to allow good take-off while keeping the CVT part more efficient. Mazda has been doing all sorts of fuel economy magic with SkyActiv and the Japanese and Koreans are still the only countries to have mass-market hydrogen cars on offer.
    Those working in the automotive industry would say it is a very fair assessment, even the Koreans have leap frogged the Japanese on a lot of fronts particularly EV design and production. The fact that Toyota & Panasonic have just yesterday?? announced a joint effort on solid state batteries compared to the Europeans who have been working on them for some years shows where the Japanese are at the moment.
    CHRIS

  12. #56
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    Honda 50 - Longest ride Sydney to Walgett taking 2 days each way.
    Austin A40 Devon 1952 - complete with a 4 gallon tin of used oil in the boot for top ups.
    Morgan Plus 4 1952 - chick magnet. One turn lock to lock steering and zero safety features.
    Mini Cooper S 1967 - stolen and found stripped at The Oaks. Mongrels.
    Simca Dash 1960 - Lay back seats were its greatest asset, rare in those days.
    Wolseley 4/44 1956 - Bit low on power but good handling for its class.
    Hillman Minx 1968 - Only ever lost one surfboard from the racks. Went well for a pommy car.
    Austin Westminster 1958 - six cylinder, four on the tree and went like billio with a 12 metre long glider trailer in tow.
    Triumph 2.5 PI 1969 - Great car as long as the electric fuel pump in the boot was insulated on hot days.
    Datsun 1600 1974 - Homely looking little car which punched way above its weight.
    Ford Mercury 1980 - An American Falcon equivalent when I lived in NYC.
    Ford Fairmont 1983 - Answered every question ever asked of it. A good all rounder.
    BMW 730Li 1985 - Kids drove me mad playing with electronic seats, windows etc.
    BMW 323I 1985 - Best performing car ever. It rode on rails.
    Range Rover 1984 - Best off road vehicle ever but a gas guzzler if there ever was one.
    Mercedes Benz 230 1988 - Known by the family as the wedding car.
    Subaru Forester XT - Brilliant handling and went like a cut cat. WRX engine.
    Mercedes Benz C320 2001 - A great sports sedan and still love driving it after 18 years.
    Ford Courier ute 2005 - a farm & timber car - turbo diesel with heaps of torque but seriously dud braking capacity.
    Suzuki Sierra - a farm and fishing car which will take you anywhere.

    mick

  13. #57
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    69 years old, bought first road worthy car at 14, then used to takes unwanted tradeins (he had service station, workshop & car yard) if I could make more than 3 pounds each on them I was happy. Been known to have onsold cars before I finally paid for them.
    I did sit down once and tried to work out how many cars had gone through my hands and had my name on rego papers after 150+ I gave up.
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

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