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  1. #16
    FenceFurniture's Avatar
    FenceFurniture is offline The prize lies beneath - hidden in full view
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    Quote Originally Posted by HUON View Post
    I really am after top of the range gear that will see me into the ground.
    Ah well laddie, you'd be after Spear & Jackson Noomber 10 shoovel!

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  3. #17
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    Got one, sorry lads I haven't had a look at the Metabo site yet. I'm busy cooking for the mob.

  4. #18
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    IMO Metabo are not what they used to be. I'm not a fan. I'd much rather go with a Makita or a big Bosch Blue 240V drill. I have an old Bosch blue 2 speed drill that I used to use to drill hardwood frames for wiring and it is still going strong after more than 20 years.
    If you want top quality, a lot of engineering companies swear by these https://fein.com/en_au/drilling/rotary-drills/
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    https://autoblastgates.com.au

  5. #19
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    I had a 1/2" Fein many years ago and it had so much torque it was dangerous.

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by FenceFurniture View Post
    So....using a Metabo Drill Stand with any drill that has a 43mm collar, you rotate the whole setup on the column around 180 so that the drill now points directly at the timber, not the drill stand base. Clamp the base to the timber, start drilling. It only has 65mm travel so then you release the holding thingo on the column (with the drill bit retracted back up) and slide the whole head down and drill again. By the time you've done 120mm hole you shouldn't need any more guidance to keep it vertical (i.e. drill freehand to finish).
    yes, that was my initial thought too, but I was thinking that the Bosch PDB40 might be the best option. But then I thought about the pain of accurately re-positioning the base every 40 mm or so along a 200 mm long mortice and the need to solidly clamp the base for each set-up and went "forget that".

    I still think that a 10 or 12" bench top drill press set up over something like a mitre saw stand is the way to go.
    Drill a line of overlapping holes to the maximum depth of travel of the drill, then finish to depth with a gutsy battery drill -- I've heard of people using impact drivers to drill large holes in softwood.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HUON View Post
    I'm too old to be a grommet.
    the Grommet reference was to Nick Park's first clay-mation feature A Grand Day Out
    Grommet is the name of Wallace's faithful, super intelligent and dexterous dog.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  8. #22
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    Thanks again, for the info . I'll check out the sites once I've set up the mill for the next log.

  9. #23
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    Here's a couple of possible contenders:

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Metabo-B...4AAOSwWSZasMb-

    https://sydneytools.com.au/bosch-gsb...c-impact-drill

    There's just not that many drills still available that will provide the prodigious torque required. High torque & very low revs at full (motor) speed will be required for super-large diameter &/or deep boring.

    The former is an extremely high quality compact low speed drill that's an old but effective design with a long & exemplary history of hard work. It's the green hardwood bridge-builder's drill of choice for drilling deck spike holes. It has a 43mm collar for drill stand work. A triple-reduction geartrain provides far more torque than its compact size suggests.

    The latter is a "newer" design of Bosch Swiss origin. Originally conceived as a diamond core drill that has alternative capabilities, it has an effective safety clutch, & according to Toolstop, is rumoured to actually have a 250mm diameter capability in concrete using diamond cores! The collar is larger than 43mm, & is thus unsuited to "standard" drill stands, but will fit older AEG type drill stands & core drill rigs. The longer cast alloy auxiliary handle & clutch make this a safe hand held user that's relatively immune from wrist-snapping lockup. One of the few genuine 2 HP drills available.

    I've used the former drill myself for decades, and use the Bosch "monster" for extreme applications only. Both come personally recommended: the former is at it's best for augers & stirring, & the latter more for general construction work.

    The use of keyed 16mm chucks are often a reliable (but not infallable) indication of a drill's high-torque capability. The use of 3 keyways in a manually tightened chuck allow triple-tightening of a chuck's jaws onto smooth shanks to a degree impossible with any current keyless chuck.
    Sycophant to nobody!

  10. #24
    FenceFurniture's Avatar
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    I tell you what Huon, you do a lot worse than this particular purchase for $75. I dare say it will kill many of the newer drills. Bit of rust on the chuck to clean up, but it must work because it has a one month warranty.

    I just checked my old Metabo, and it's a "S be 500/2 R+L", which is 500w, 2 speed. The top speeds in the gears are 900 and ~2500, so it will have nowhere near the torque of the 75 16 (more power, lower rpm = more torque), and mine already has wrist snapping torque.

    eBay search of all used Metabo drills.
    Last edited by FenceFurniture; 20th Jun 2018 at 01:57 PM. Reason: add eBay search

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCArcher View Post
    IMO Metabo are not what they used to be.
    I think that applies to almost all the brands these days Tony, and anything that is still Euro made will be exxy (or so we think because we have been conditioned to Chinese prices).

  12. #26
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    I have a 1970's vintage Bosch impact drill probably a much earlier version of that shown in the Sydney tools link above. It was my Dad's that we used in his building business to bore 5/8" holes through timber house frames, the 3x3" top plates then through an 8x3" head (usually Johnstone River Hardwood) for cyclone rods and various other tasks.

    It was a beast of a thing that would rip your arms off if the bit jambed. Not sure that I would like to have a 2" bit in it.
    Mobyturns

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  13. #27
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    I've got a green Bosch cordless drill I bought in 2006 that's still going on it's original battery (although it's been hobby / handyman rather than trade use) so I would recommend anything bosch - that said all my other power tools are Makita.
    At the end of the day, Bosch and Makita are the best unless you want to get in to the big buck trade gear like Dewalt and AEG.
    Best thing to do is go to Bunnings or somewhere that has a decent range and select by feel. Pick up and handle each drill, everyone is different, what feels right to someone else may not feel right to you so pick a decent brand that feels right in your hand.

    However as Fencefurniture said, your best solution is some sort of base. Bunnings do a half inch bench mounted Ozito drill press for $99, or for $429 you can get a direct drive electronic Bosch drill press (it's on my wish list) which at only 11.2kg would be ideal for taking outside.

  14. #28
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    sorry again, the computer's decided to come back on line. Nice drill "Ratbag", I've used diamond core drills before (Hilti I think). The stand would work a treat if I can adapt it to that $669 or was it $699 drill, whatever.

  15. #29
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    Still haven't checked out the other sites. Will get around to it this morning.
    Cheers

  16. #30
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    Again computer problems, Ian I've got to be careful with certain electronics. I've had to return a festool router that has the slow start up feature, our stand alone power system plays funny buggers with sensitive electronics. I've also found out that we can't use ac ceiling fans only dc. So I'm a bit cautious when electronics are used in sales promotion.

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