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  1. #1
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    Default abosoloute bargain on rebadged milwaukee drill

    hey guys. so, i popped into the power tool specialists as i'd been looking for a decent drill for drilling steel . I've currently been using my cordless drills which wasn't fantastic. so i asked the guy at the counter if he had many for under a 100 and he said "yeah about zilch" . looked like i was going to Bunnings for some Chinese crap. then the other guy chimed in with "what about the that keyless AEG one". 'Oh yeah forgot about that , how are you paying?" guessed cash was gonna be the correct answer. so he took me over to a giant stack of AEG Ergomax which he then showed me in the catalogue was a rebadged $400 made in Germany Milwaukee T-TEC201. for... $109 and its a beautty. it has 149.99 on there web page in the specials page but its been further reduced at least until Christmas. the guy came in just after me and was looking for a corded drill for his dad for Christmas and we both had our cash out in about 30 seconds.

    Has a 3 year warranty, a really nice removable rohm 13mm keyless chuck (worth about $100 on it's own), and the rear handle is removable which might come in handy one day.

    Just thought I'd share this as it's a great deal. he has about 150 of them

    Cheers
    Bert

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  3. #2
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    where is the shop and what is their website ?

  4. #3
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    Sounds to good to be true. At that price its probably a rebadged Ryobi, as Ryobi, AEG and Milwaukee are owned by the same Chinese company.

  5. #4
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    whoops, i meant to add the link . here it is
    Power Tool Specialists : Victoria's #1 Makita Dealer, STIHL Dealer, shop online for widest range of powertools | Milwaukee DeWalt Hitachi Panasonic BOSCH Festool Metabo Makita STIHL
    'Power tool specialists' 149 Bouverie Street Carlton VIC

    nah its Definitely a Milwaukee. unless Ryobi and co have started making tools in Germany...

    just had a bit of a play with some hole saws in hardwood and it is very nice.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shouldameasured View Post

    nah its Definitely a Milwaukee. unless Ryobi and co have started making tools in Germany...
    Did you see "Made in Germany" printed on the side of the drill casing?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lignum View Post
    Did you see "Made in Germany" printed on the side of the drill casing?
    yes.

  8. #7
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    Nice find shoulda Looks like a genuine bargain.
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    https://autoblastgates.com.au

  9. #8
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    Bunnings are selling this range and i had a look today and 100% made in China.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lignum View Post
    Bunnings are selling this range and i had a look today and 100% made in China.
    I'm not so sure. They are on Justtools site too and they reckon they're made in Germany.
    To be old and wise you must first be young and stupid!

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bodgia View Post
    I'm not so sure. They are on Justtools site too and they reckon they're made in Germany.
    Same range is at Bunnies and all made in China. Maybe the OP can post a pic of his drill where it has made in Germany printed.

    The Just tools drill is made in Germany but i will bet anything the the $109 OP drill and the Bunnies ones have cheaper gearing etc and just the AEG casing

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lignum View Post
    Same range is at Bunnies and all made in China. Maybe the OP can post a pic of his drill where it has made in Germany printed.

    The Just tools drill is made in Germany but i will bet anything the the $109 OP drill and the Bunnies ones have cheaper gearing etc and just the AEG casing

    Having had the displeasure of going to Bunnings today (on a Christmas Eve Saturday!) to get some Heat Beads. I checked out the AEG drills.

    Are you sure your not mistaking it with this Chinese made rotary hammer drill?
    http://www.aegpowertools.com.au/prod...mmers/BH26LXE/
    Last edited by Kyle; 24th Dec 2011 at 09:51 PM. Reason: change of tack

  13. #12
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    Hi all,\

    for starters: may i wish you all a very prosperous, healthy, accident-free and project-rich 2012 ?

    The Ergomax in the bargain looks like the real thing all right. As for "Made in Germany"; that's a relative thing in this case. The T-Tec drill design was not from AEG in the first place, but a Milwaukee development. It was introduced on the market in Milwaukee-red, together with a similarly odd looking jig saw. By then AEG and Milwaukee were already owned by TechTronics Industries from Hong Kong, so many tool models were shared amongst these brands, with AEG Winnenden designs having a red Milwaukee appearance and vice versa. For instance, AEG Winnenden already carried a good quality battery tool program (which didn't look impressive and hence wasn't recognised as such), but the better part of the present AEG battery program consists of Milwaukee designs. Really evergreen AEG Winnenden designs like the large metal drills, some pneumatic hammers and some saws, are still made in Winnenden, including their red Milwaukee liveries. These are the only occasions where the imprint "Made in Germany" in Milwaukee tools is both present and justified.

    About the Ergomax drill i'm not so sure. If Winnenden ever had anything to do with it at all, i think the AEG badged version has merely been assembled there, from imported dark blue parts made by Milwaukee plants, or - in a later stage- from orange parts made by TTI's own Chinese production facilities. I suspect that the orange version has been made and assembled in China entirely. It is widely known that TTI chose to replace the famous AEG-blue for the present orange livery, because this is also the colour they use for Ridgid-products. Ridgid is another brand that was scooped up by TTI. By using the same colour, there is yet more low-cost model-swapping possible, between the joined product portfolios of AEG, Milwaukee and Ridgid.

    Suspecting Chinese products to have less quality is still valid in many cases, but where European and American A-brands have mingled to such extent as in this case, i think the same suspicion is no longer justified. Even Metabo has joined in and has more and more of its products made by TTI's facilities. In this forum TTI-'s belt sander, as sold in AEG, Metabo and Ridgid colours, has been a vivid topic of discussion. As Chinese power tools go, it wasn't half bad and many users know this for a fact. So for this money, the orange Ergomax above should be a reasonable investment. This model is also on sale in AEG's home country Germany itself, as this Ebay Germany link will testify:

    aeg ergomax | eBay

    Compare the pictures; i think the offer introduced in this post is the real thing al right.

    greetings

    gerhard

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard View Post
    Hi all,

    for starters: may i wish you all a very prosperous, healthy, accident-free and project-rich 2012 ?

    The Ergomax in the bargain looks like the real thing all right. As for "Made in Germany"; that's a relative thing in this case. The T-Tec drill design was not from AEG in the first place, but a Milwaukee development. It was introduced on the market in Milwaukee-red, together with a similarly odd looking jig saw. By then AEG and Milwaukee were already owned by TechTronics Industries from Hong Kong, so many tool models were shared amongst these brands, with AEG Winnenden designs having a red Milwaukee appearance and vice versa. For instance, AEG Winnenden already carried a good quality battery tool program (which didn't look impressive and hence wasn't recognised as such), but the better part of the present AEG battery program consists of Milwaukee designs. Really evergreen AEG Winnenden designs like the large metal drills, some pneumatic hammers and some saws, are still made in Winnenden, including their red Milwaukee liveries. These are the only occasions where the imprint "Made in Germany" in Milwaukee tools is both present and justified.

    About the Ergomax drill i'm not so sure. If Winnenden ever had anything to do with it at all, i think the AEG badged version has merely been assembled there, from imported dark blue parts made by Milwaukee plants, or - in a later stage- from orange parts made by TTI's own Chinese production facilities. I suspect that the orange version has been made and assembled in China entirely. It is widely known that TTI chose to replace the famous AEG-blue for the present orange livery, because this is also the colour they use for Ridgid-products. Ridgid is another brand that was scooped up by TTI. By using the same colour, there is yet more low-cost model-swapping possible, between the joined product portfolios of AEG, Milwaukee and Ridgid.

    Suspecting Chinese products to have less quality is still valid in many cases, but where European and American A-brands have mingled to such extent as in this case, i think the same suspicion is no longer justified. Even Metabo has joined in and has more and more of its products made by TTI's facilities. In this forum TTI-'s belt sander, as sold in AEG, Metabo and Ridgid colours, has been a vivid topic of discussion. As Chinese power tools go, it wasn't half bad and many users know this for a fact. So for this money, the orange Ergomax above should be a reasonable investment. This model is also on sale in AEG's home country Germany itself, as this Ebay Germany link will testify:

    aeg ergomax | eBay

    Compare the pictures; i think the offer introduced in this post is the real thing al right.

    greetings

    gerhard
    G'day Gerhard,
    Again your depth of knowledge in the power tool industry is outstanding.
    Thank you for taking the time as you so often do to explain things in such simple detail.
    Cheers, crowie

  15. #14
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    I got an 18volt Milwaukee drill and impact driver with 3 batteries about 8 months ago for $490 it has Germany on the label and also Made in China. But I was sold on the 5 year tool warranty and 2 year battery warranty.
    woodworm.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard View Post
    Hi all,

    for starters: may i wish you all a very prosperous, healthy, accident-free and project-rich 2012 ?

    The Ergomax in the bargain looks like the real thing all right. As for "Made in Germany"; that's a relative thing in this case. The T-Tec drill design was not from AEG in the first place, but a Milwaukee development. It was introduced on the market in Milwaukee-red, together with a similarly odd looking jig saw. By then AEG and Milwaukee were already owned by TechTronics Industries from Hong Kong, so many tool models were shared amongst these brands, with AEG Winnenden designs having a red Milwaukee appearance and vice versa. For instance, AEG Winnenden already carried a good quality battery tool program (which didn't look impressive and hence wasn't recognised as such), but the better part of the present AEG battery program consists of Milwaukee designs. Really evergreen AEG Winnenden designs like the large metal drills, some pneumatic hammers and some saws, are still made in Winnenden, including their red Milwaukee liveries. These are the only occasions where the imprint "Made in Germany" in Milwaukee tools is both present and justified.

    About the Ergomax drill i'm not so sure. If Winnenden ever had anything to do with it at all, i think the AEG badged version has merely been assembled there, from imported dark blue parts made by Milwaukee plants, or - in a later stage- from orange parts made by TTI's own Chinese production facilities. I suspect that the orange version has been made and assembled in China entirely. It is widely known that TTI chose to replace the famous AEG-blue for the present orange livery, because this is also the colour they use for Ridgid-products. Ridgid is another brand that was scooped up by TTI. By using the same colour, there is yet more low-cost model-swapping possible, between the joined product portfolios of AEG, Milwaukee and Ridgid.

    Suspecting Chinese products to have less quality is still valid in many cases, but where European and American A-brands have mingled to such extent as in this case, i think the same suspicion is no longer justified. Even Metabo has joined in and has more and more of its products made by TTI's facilities. In this forum TTI-'s belt sander, as sold in AEG, Metabo and Ridgid colours, has been a vivid topic of discussion. As Chinese power tools go, it wasn't half bad and many users know this for a fact. So for this money, the orange Ergomax above should be a reasonable investment. This model is also on sale in AEG's home country Germany itself, as this Ebay Germany link will testify:

    aeg ergomax | eBay

    Compare the pictures; i think the offer introduced in this post is the real thing al right.

    greetings

    gerhard
    Greetings Gerhard. Happy New Year.

    It is with some trepidation, given your vastly superior knowledge of European tool manufacturers, that I beg to differ from your explanation.

    Both of the abovementioned tools, the T-Tec 201/Ergomax and STEP 800X actually predate TTI's ownership of the company. They were designed by a team of Swedish University anatomists, doctors and engineers, together with AEG's development team, at the behest of Atlas Copco, the then owners of AEG and Milwaukee.

    I once had a book, published by Atlas Copco, grandly titled something along the lines of "How to design power tools". In this book is explained, at great length and in great detail, their current understanding of the "science" of ergonomics, and how this could be applied to power tool design. The book cited examples of how the study of human anatomy and physiology could be applied to tool design. Both of these tools, and other AEG/Atlas tools such as the SB750RX and some of their grinders were illustrated throughout the developmental, prototyping and production phases as examples of applied ergonomic design.

    I have a couple of the original black Atlas T-Tec 201's and an AEG blue STEP 800X dating from Atlas Copco's ownership. All of these tools are clearly marked as "Made in Germany", although I believe that manufacture of at least some of these tools has subsequently been shifted to the Czech Republic. At the time, Atlas Copco was to have been the flagship line of tools with AEG being a less expensive line, with the same design but cheaper chucks etc, and steel instead of cast alloy baseplates on the saws.

    Exactly how the Atlas Copco line was eventually absorbed, and changed from Atlas black to Milwaukee red I'm unsure. I'm guessing that perhaps Atlas Copco never actually owned Milwaukee at the time, and so used their Atlas name for the flagship range. If so it makes sense that TTI, having acquired AEG from Atlas Copco, and Milwaukee from its (separate??) owners at a similar time, would rebadge these Atlas designs as Milwaukee.

    What is unforgiveable, in my opinion, is that both companies made deliberate policy decisions to debase the name of AEG tools as a "budget" line. AEG has had a long and proud history as one of Europe's premier manufacturing icons.

    The drills are great. They tick many of the right boxes for me: high torque (even at low revs) in low, and very high speed in top gears. A locking, all metal Rohm chuck with carbide jaws provides secure click-locking of cylindrical shanks, essential for high torque loads. These features, together with a positively indexed front and removeable rear handles makes it my preferred tool for drilling hardwood studs, with speedbor augers, for electrical installation work. It's the only sufficiently powerful drill I've found that's short enough to comfortably and safely fit between studs. I've been able to drill through triple and quad studs (including nails) in one go with a stubby 25mm dia. auger. Anyone who works in kiln dried hardwood will know just how much power this takes. The only criticisms I'd level at the tool are that the mid "handle", being the motor housing, is perhaps a tad fat for my smallish hands, and that there's no brake on the motor, allowing run-on, in common with most electric drills on the market.

    The Jigsaw is another little gem. While not as powerful or as sophisticated as it's peers, its small size and superb design make it the most comfortable and easiest to use of any jigsaw i've ever handled. It can be just as easily used as a top-handle for cutting from above or bodygrip for cutting from underneath the workpiece. It's tool-less blade changing and soleplate tilting mechanisms have been much imitated by most other manufacturers. In its day it was one of the most innovative designs available.

    Some ergo designs work really well.

    These tools are excellent, innovative and bold examples of the successful application of ergonomic principles to tool design.

    They are by no means unique, however. Metabo has also applied ergonomics to tool design, with an excellent pair of 125 and 150mm ergo grinders that work and handle particularly well.

    Some other tools have been less successful. Their range of PowerGrip and PowerMaxx driver and drill, were extremely well designed and beautifully manufactured in Germany to similar standards as the Swiss apply to their watch manufacture. They have the slim, curvaceous, tactile and pocketable appeal that becomes an extension of one's hand. Unfortunately they were also irremediably compromised by the limitations of their battery capacity and runtime:a mere 4.8v and 1.25ah. A later generation of manufacturers have applied the principles pioneered by Metabo (much less successfully in my opinion) with more powerful and user friendly lithium battery technology to produce their current ranges of 10.8v tools. Metabo's original tools were failures only in regard to the limitations imposed by available battery technology and their high cost due to precision German manufacturing. East Asia just does it so much cheaper these days, but not really as well in my opinion.

    Their most disastrous failure, however, was to engage Porsche Design of Austria (Ferry, not Ferdinand) to "improve" their small SDS Multihammer. The result is, in my opinion, one of the boldest but worst drill designs of all time. Imagine, if you will, a drill made entirely out of carbon fibre panelling and cast aluminium that is designed to be used UPSIDE DOWN! It would be bad enough to use horizontally, and worse to use on the floor at one's feet. But imagine trying to use it overhead in either horizontal or vertical orientation!

    Naturally enough, very few were ever sold, especially at the asking price of over double that of the original Metabo UHE "donor" drill.

    But to be fair to Metabo, this latter example was a triumph of aesthetic design (it was extremely eye catching) over ergonomics. I doubt that the good fellows at Porsche Design really understood what the tool was to be used for, and consequently fulfilled their brief with a tool for poseurs. Any tradesman would laugh such a useless tool off any building site.

    That's not applied ergonomics: that's just an overpaid bunch of wankers failing to comprehend the fundamental principles of tool design.
    Sycophant to nobody!

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