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  1. #1
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    Default Recommendations for handheld belt sander?

    I'm looking to buy a handheld belt sander for initial sanding of timber slabs, what brands/models have people found to be good and long lasting? And what ones to avoid? Looking at 240v rather than cordless but could also go air-powered.

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  3. #2
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    Hi and welcome,

    I have a large Makita, which works well. But several years ago, I changed to a Festool RO150 Random Orbital Sander. The difference quite unbelievable. More control, easier to work with and a sensational finish at the end. Yep you can adjust from sanding rough timber (such as slabs), all the way through to a beautiful finish. But if you want a Belt sander, I have one for sale at $400.00 If you want further info on either of the sanders I've mentioned,let me know.

    Regards,

    Rob

  4. #3
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    Makita 9924DB, had one at my old work and it was pretty much indestructible; plenty of power and well balanced in the hands.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    Makita 9924DB, had one at my old work and it was pretty much indestructible; plenty of power and well balanced in the hands.
    Cheers Elan - looks like the local tool shop has that model in stock.

  6. #5
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    The platen is extra wide as well, so you can use 100mm belts even though the wheels are only 75mm wide.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGS View Post
    Hi and welcome,

    I have a large Makita, which works well. But several years ago, I changed to a Festool RO150 Random Orbital Sander. The difference quite unbelievable. More control, easier to work with and a sensational finish at the end. Yep you can adjust from sanding rough timber (such as slabs), all the way through to a beautiful finish. But if you want a Belt sander, I have one for sale at $400.00 If you want further info on either of the sanders I've mentioned,let me know.

    Regards,

    Rob
    Cheers Rob, plan is to have an air-driven random orbital sander, sometimes you just need to get bulk but not pretty work done and the belt sander will be the go for that.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSD View Post
    Cheers Rob, plan is to have an air-driven random orbital sander, sometimes you just need to get bulk but not pretty work done and the belt sander will be the go for that.
    The specific model he mentioned will do both, it has a switchable geared head. They're not cheap though...

    Any reason you're going for air powered? They're noisy as...

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    The specific model he mentioned will do both, it has a switchable geared head. They're not cheap though...

    Any reason you're going for air powered? They're noisy as...
    I guess its because I've always used air tools and I've got a 1850 lpm hydrovane compressor sitting there longing to be used...

  10. #9
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    Compressed air is one of the most expensive ways to power a tool and, if I'm not mistaken, rotary vane compressors like to be running constantly, not start/stop like piston units.

    In a factory setting where there's constant demand for air it might be the way to go, but I don't think it's the best option for a small operation.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanjacobs View Post
    Compressed air is one of the most expensive ways to power a tool and, if I'm not mistaken, rotary vane compressors like to be running constantly, not start/stop like piston units.

    In a factory setting where there's constant demand for air it might be the way to go, but I don't think it's the best option for a small operation.
    The compressor will be running constantly, instead of using a fan with filters to a helmet/hood like the Triton Helmet I'm going to using compressed air to the helmet - we already have that setup for the epoxy work that we do.

    One of the other advantages I see with an air powered random orbital sander is that the dust collection fitting on air sanders is much higher up on the tool so you aren't dragging the flexible duct hose across your work, whereas with all the electrical ones I've seen the hose attachment is right down low almost level with the work surface - probably just a preference thing.

  12. #11
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    Makita 9403. I've used one of these very heavily for probably close to 7 years (in an industrial setting). The only things I've had to do to it in that time is replace the graphite slip pad and I think I may have replaced the brushes. Although in saying that, I do need to replace the plastic shroud around the impeller as it has worn through from the amount of dust that has gone through it.
    Having also used the one that elanjacobs has recommended, I would spend the extra $110.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSD View Post
    Cheers Rob, plan is to have an air-driven random orbital sander, sometimes you just need to get bulk but not pretty work done and the belt sander will be the go for that.
    The Festool RO150 is a much better tool than a belt sander for removing stock plus will do finishing work. I have done a lot of blackbutt slab work and the Festool has been brilliant. It was expensive but worth every cent with what it has done.
    I wouldn’t bother buying another belt sander

  14. #13
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    Picked up a Makita 9924DB this afternoon for a reasonable price at the local tool shop. It was concerning to see how little stock they had - they said that there were bid delays getting stuff from interstate and overseas.

  15. #14
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    a local slab machinist/carpenter recommended to me that you should really buy a 100mm belt sander, especially for slabs

  16. #15
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    The one he got takes 100mm belts

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