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  1. #1
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    Default How Many Cubic Meters From a 2.7 x 1.4 meter Oak Log

    I purchased an oak log that is 2.7 x 1.4 meters and I am getting it milled into Quarter sawn boards with a lucas mill and I am keen to know how much Ruffly will I get out of a such a log.

    I have done a search an everything is for super foot and I am not into that stuff.

    Can anyone give me a simple ballpark answer.

    Oak-2.jpg

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by thumbsucker View Post
    I purchased an oak log that is 2.7 x 1.4 meters and I am getting it milled into Quarter sawn boards with a lucas mill and I am keen to know how much Ruffly will I get out of a such a log.

    I have done a search an everything is for super foot and I am not into that stuff.

    Can anyone give me a simple ballpark answer.

    Oak-2.jpg
    Lots !
    But I feel you may be after something a bit more useful than my not very useful advice.
    Hopefully some of the milers will be along shortly with a more detailed explanation of how to work that out[emoji849].

    Cheers Matt,

  4. #3
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    Raw volume is Pi*r≤*h where r is the average radius and h is the length of the log. What you actually get out of that as usable timber will be somewhat less.
    Regards, FenceFurniture

    COLT DRILLS GROUP BUY
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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FenceFurniture View Post
    What you actually get out of that as usable timber will be somewhat less.
    with variable quantities of somewhat

  6. #5
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    Volume is 4.156m3 thereabouts
    A log that size and shape should yield around 2 sawn cube
    Around 50% recovery is a realistic volume
    A reasonable amount of quarter sawn material too
    Very sound investment indeed!
    Hope you engage a good operator...MM
    Mapleman

  7. #6
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    It depends if you want the "entire log" milled as quarter sawn.

    If you want the whole log milled as quarter sawn it will be interesting to see what the miller charges for that (ie bit more work)
    OR
    You accept a basic/budget milling operation whereby about 1/4 of the 2 saw cube will be effectively quarter sawn.

  8. #7
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    Milling these big old logs with a Lucas mill is always a joy
    Because of the growth ring orientation,and swing blade capability,, a clever miller will extract well over 25% quarter sawn of total sawn volume
    Without much extra effort or expense!
    Engage someone with talent and an eye for milling...MM
    Mapleman

  9. #8
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    I have secured the service of a professional saw Miller who specialises in urban salvage. How good he is I donít know but he comes recommend.

    He is charging $600 for the job.

    2 cubes of quarter sawn for a total cost of $1300 is not bad since the market rate for a cube of quarter sawn English Oak is $7000 a cube.

    I am thinking of getting it cut into 75mm thick boards. Yes it will take 5 years to dry but I have plans that need big stock.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by thumbsucker View Post
    I have secured the service of a professional saw Miller who specialises in urban salvage. How good he is I donít know but he comes recommend.

    He is charging $600 for the job.

    2 cubes of quarter sawn for a total cost of $1300 is not bad since the market rate for a cube of quarter sawn English Oak is $7000 a cube.

    I am thinking of getting it cut into 75mm thick boards. Yes it will take 5 years to dry but I have plans that need big stock.
    Don't forget to wax end seal the log or sawn product as i noticed a little bit of degrade happening...MM
    Mapleman

  11. #10
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    About 0.5 cu m (maybe bit more) will be fully quarter sawn (from estimates Chris has provided), and he's an expert. Careful drying will be necessary but should yield beautiful wood for furniture. Some will be near quarter sawn, that will also be fine wood if it doesent warp twist while drying. Its a good deal you got.
    End coat, carefully sticker / stack and dry carefully as suggested. You can end coat with a water based acrylic if you wish eg a undercoat and works well.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by thumbsucker View Post
    I have secured the service of a professional saw Miller who specialises in urban salvage. How good he is I don’t know but he comes recommend.

    He is charging $600 for the job.

    2 cubes of quarter sawn for a total cost of $1300 is not bad since the market rate for a cube of quarter sawn English Oak is $7000 a cube.
    Yes a good deal but you are assuming 100% recovery after it has dried, some will crack, some will twist, pest infection etc so this won't happen.
    Do you have a suitable place to dry it? Ideally out fo the weather and direct sunlight but not shut up in an almost sealed shed or it may go mouldy
    The sawn timber should be stacked using at least 3/4" thick dry timber separators spaced ~18" apart, and ideally have about a ton or so of weight put on top of the stacks.

    I am thinking of getting it cut into 75mm thick boards. Yes it will take 5 years to dry but I have plans that need big stock.
    AT 75 mm it will take about 3 years or more specifically 3 summers to dry to a point where it should be safe to work.

    I would not get it all cut to 75mm, I'd get some cut at 50, most at 75 and a small amount at 100, widths are your choice.

  13. #12
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    In the past I have used cheap bulk PVA two or three heavy coats worked really well.

    Is this what you mean by water based acrylic

    https://www.bunnings.com.au/spring-1...rcoat_p1400421

    I am thinking of buying Vic ash boards then cutting 19mm x 30mm x 1500mm stickers

    And then stickering my boards --

    1400mm diameter log cut into 75mm thick boards gives about 17 layers
    2700mm length log stickered every 250mm apart will need 12 stickers per layer

    12 x 17 equals 84 stickers

    Would that be enough?

    I have a 8 x 4 meter steel shed with a cement floor that has doors on one long side that can left open. I am also thinking to use a large fan to push air around.

  14. #13
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    Oak is notoriously hard to dry. I know, I've dried plenty. Your log volume is approx 4.1m3. Your sawn yield should be between 50 to 60 percent. Full quartering will yield less but that will be offset by the after dried yield. As I said earlier, this is mongrel stuff to dry. Stability in quarter sawn material is much better than rift or backsawn. The loses during drying will be more the further off the quarter the log is milled. Oak must be dried slowly. Breeze is good, wind is not. The slower the better but not so slow that mould can develop. Narrow and shallow and close for stickers is the rule for oak. I prefer 1" x 3/4" or 25 x 18mm in metric. Bugs love this stuff - Midge proof netting helps here, not for Midges but for other wood eating critters of small proportion.
    In summery: Cool, dry, shadded location. End sealer. Small stickers, close spaced and close to ends. Bug proofing, chemical, netting or both.
    Now cross your fingers and seek devine intervention.
    Nice log by the way.

  15. #14
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    Heaps of excellent advice here mate. Shed for drying sounds fine , maybe bit hot in mid summer. I would reduce board yield to focus on quality, quarter sawn boards as much as possible, and some 50mm in thickness as suggested. These will season best and be less prone to self destruction. Not sure about 100mm square eg for table legs.

    The water based undercoats for end coating are fine, 2-3 coats are enough to slow or near stop end drying and cracking. Slow even drying (mild drafts/air flow) through the stack in mild temp conditions is what you are aiming for with a MILD air flow in cooler months and almost none in hot conditions ie to avoid extremes in temp and humidity around the wood in first 1-2 years. Low humidity and high temp and too much air flow are worst for causing cracking. Moisture has to diffuse from inside of the boards to the outside where it is removed to the air. (If the moisture gradient is too high stresses from contraction on exterior of boards cause cracking.) Stickering is important to keep boards flat and weights on top eg again cement building blocks may be useful. Keep the stack above floor (say 30-40 cm) by using such concrete blocks.

    Lots of good advice here from those with personal experience but message is largely consistent. Netting will reduce airflow as well as keep some bugs out. Inspect every 6 mths and look for frass (sawdust from insects, esp. in sapwood) Borax (cheap easy to dip or spray) can reduce powderpost beetle attack in sapwood. This is a great adventure Thumbsucker but worth the effort.

    Cheers Eug

    PS & edit: "Narrow and shallow and close for stickers is the rule for oak." (rustynail) is good advice too, it helps maintain higher humidity between boards to reduces rate of drying. As he says, SLOW drying is imperative for oak.

  16. #15
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    I got some scrap pine and started cutting stickers I will need. As per advice to cut them smaller I have cut them 10mm x 20mm x 1000mm.

    The only problem with them being so thin is they are very fragile and I can see them breaking.

    I have some green elm that I have stickered at the bottom of the pile and then I placed dry boards one top to weight it all down.

    I am placing the stickers 400mm apart and as close to the ends of the elm boards

    exOEk%AASRSwgfcwHHSDag.jpg 4S3si9DURbWwRsyWc5RcNQ.jpg p1QcaFPUQBWpXKIAlRaoBg.jpg

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