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  1. #1
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    Default Where do I cut?!

    G'day all,

    New to the forum and on a new property! I am looking to get into some milling/wood working. I would have loved to spend hours digesting the knowledge here but in the recent storms we've had 3 rather large trees come down over the driveway so I need quick advice!

    I've got a chainsaw and need to move some logs. I would like to know in what lengths and what diameter do I cut these up so they have maximum use and value for later milling? I don't want to cut them into small sections to later find out I should have made them 4,6,8 meters etc. I can't leave them as they are because I can't move them! Advice such as - 5m lengths, diameter > Xm would be great!

    Any help would be most appreciated so I can cut them and get them out of the way for later processing. Also, any idea what species? I though maybe a rough barked apple but I'm not sure.

    Thanks in advance.
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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Shepparton
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    Default

    no idea of species but cut to whatever can be handled ,don't forget to seal the ends to avoid cracks.

  4. #3
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    Feb 2019
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    Kingston TAS
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    Default

    Be careful with that "widow maker" in the second photo

  5. #4
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    Default

    Best to ID from foliage / flowers / fruits or buds of a tree. Bark can help confirm. Wood color density appearance can help confiirm id. Good quality pics, ie close ups in focus are best for ID. Remember… a good id adds value and will help with knowledge about milling, drying, woodworking and finishing to buyers.

    Sizes. Depending on diameter & how much manual & mechanical help you have (persons, trailer lifting gear trucks hoists etc). You could get an arborist or experienced cutter to help with log in situ. Safety is always #1 priority.

    Furniture makers like longer lengths to play with, quarter sawn boards min 30 mm thick always best IMO. Off-cuts can be blanks for turners if quality good enough. As the "mature one" said .... END COAT ASAP to reduce firewood pile

    Euge

  6. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mature one View Post
    no idea of species but cut to whatever can be handled ,don't forget to seal the ends to avoid cracks.
    I agree, Unless you need pieces for craft wood I would forget about anything <300 mm in diameter.

    2.6-2.7m is a useful minimum length that allows for a small amount of splitting and still being able to extract a 2.4m length.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
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    Default

    Thanks for the quick replies! Yes I will be vary wary, I've had quite a few trees down but these are the first to deal with.

    I should have access to a tractor from a neighbour hopefully and I have a good shed not too far away for storage. I'll cut them >2.7

    What should I seal the logs with once I cut them?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Sydney
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by notevensquare View Post
    Be careful with that "widow maker" in the second photo
    Out of interest, can someone explain the issue in the photo?

    Thanks!

    Adam

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk

  9. #8
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    Mobyturns is offline In An Instant Your Life Can Change Forever
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    Quote Originally Posted by taz01 View Post
    Out of interest, can someone explain the issue in the photo?
    Its a "hung" tree, so it may move unexpectedly at any time, from wind, the supporting tree giving way, etc. Fallen / leaning trees with partially exposed root balls may also "stand up" if / when part of the head of the tree is removed. Exercise care, plan & clear escape paths, carefully assess the "tensions" in the tree, plan cut sequence so bar & chain don't become jambed as the cut may close up, and err on the side of caution when cutting such trees.

    Cutting the "supporting tree" (first) is very risky!!!!! the supporting tree can shatter during cutting, may kick back, fold, fall prematurely etc. If you do have access to a tractor, its a far less risky exercise to cut near the base of the leaner then snig it out of the supporting tree.

    There are others with extensive tree felling experience who are far more qualified to give guidance on "safest" course of action.
    Mobyturns

    In An Instant Your Life CanChange Forever

  10. #9
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    Jul 2003
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    Near Bodgy, AlexS, Wongo & CraigB
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    If you use a lucas mill (or get one on site) the standard length is between 2.4 - 3m).
    Zed

  11. #10
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    As an ex forester I wouldn't touch that tree with a saw, its hard to say how it would move when it's cut through. A machine is a far safer means of dealing with it. Depending on how big your tractor is it may do the job. If trying to drag it I would loop the drag chain around the butt so it wants to roll the tree as it starts to move, that is much easier than a straight pull.

    Tony
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
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    Thanks guys, I very much appreciate the advice and I will now pull/roll the hung tree down! I never even thought about it 'standing back up'. I had an ecologist mate take a look and they are Sydney peppermint gums!

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    bilpin
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    Default

    Not a milling specie. Very unstable, prone to warp and check, high shrinkage.

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