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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    Default Stihl 2 in 1 chainsaw blade sharpener

    I’m not into tree felling or slabbing - I just want to “prune” garden limbs when needed, maybe cut some garden sleepers to length etc. I only have an electric chainsaw which is doing the job admirable at the moment including a “one off” Yakka stump “trim”

    DFFEF0C0-551F-4CC8-8413-3BCD58945A61.jpeg


    which is why I need a simple but effective sharpener.

    The reviews all seem positive and it looks relatively simple to use as it does cutter plus depth gauge at the same time.

    I’m not wanting a complex discussion on the theory of chain sharpening just a simple answer

    So, has anyone used one and if so what do you think?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    487

    Default

    "Yes", and "get one".

    I'm an occasional user, and after about five years of using a normal round file and guide, I bought the combined job. So much simpler in every way from my perspective, and those I know personally who have made the switch too.

    Kind regards,
    Lance

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    173

    Default

    Very happy with mine. I even bought a second one for a smaller saw that I have.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    23,261

    Default

    This will be fine for an electric chainsaw especially when the chain is newish and gardening work.

    The main issue with this tool is that as the chain wears it will not remove enough from the depth gauge/rakers to maintain good cutting speed so the chainsaw will start to make few chips and more dust. If you find this happening just use small flat file and take few swipes off the rakers after you use the 2 in 1.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    This will be fine for an electric chainsaw especially when the chain is newish and gardening work.

    The main issue with this tool is that as the chain wears it will not remove enough from the depth gauge/rakers to maintain good cutting speed so the chainsaw will start to make few chips and more dust. If you find this happening just use small flat file and take few swipes off the rakers after you use the 2 in 1.
    The reason it is called a 2 in 1 is that it does the rakers at the same time as it files the cutter thereby keeping the cutting depth the same. It has two files in the unit; one file for the blade and a flat file for the raker.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    23,261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lappa View Post
    The reason it is called a 2 in 1 is that it does the rakers at the same time as it files the cutter thereby keeping the cutting depth the same. It has two files in the unit; one file for the blade and a flat file for the raker.
    Yep I have tried one and I understand how they work and but their angles are not optimised either for fast cutting or long term chain wear.

    Optimised long term cutting performance is not achieved by using the same cutting depths during the life of the chain. As the cutter gullets get longer the rakers have to be dropped much more than one might expect. Most CS users just buy a new chain when the chain gets past a certain point. CS manufacturers like that.

    What I didn't mention in my last post is optimised cutting speed is achieved with much lower rakers than achieved by all commercial filing jigs including the 2 in 1. Manufacturers recommend relatively shallow angles because it is supposedly safer ie reduced kickback, but that doesn't take into account that it then takes longer to make each cut which means longer exposure to a running saw, and some users pushing unnecessarily harder which further adds to risk.

    For firewood collecting and gardening, the 2 in 1 will be suit most users especially when the chain is new. Just providing a heads up for later on when the chain has started to wear down from repeated sharpening, andstill it seems to go blunt really quickly despite repeated sharpening. To further extend the life of chain some extra swiping of the rakers with a flat file will make a lot of difference. Of course this problem can also be solved by a new chain.

    This chain is close to the end of its life but still cuts like a new chain. To do that the rakers have been filed down till there is almost no raker left.
    Soon the cutters will start breaking off and that's when I make up a new loop.
    Rakerdepth2.JPG

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Posts
    1,032

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    It may or may not be relevant to the thread starter, but on Saturday the 16th of November, Aldi is having electric chain saw sharpeners on special for $39.99.

    Not on their website yet, but will be after the coming Saturday passes.

    Picked up their new catalogue today.

    Mick.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Default

    As I’m just a fiddler, the Stihl 2 in 1, from a chainsaw firm that has been around since 1916 and has had the thumbs up from a number of people, will do me.
    I doubt I’ll wear this chain out in my lifetime.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Macksville
    Age
    57
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    247

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    I've got the Pferd branded one, which the chainsaw shop said is who make the Stihl one. It was a lot cheaper at the time, but I now see the Stihl ones on Ebay for less that half what I paid.
    I use my CS for similar things to you & find it does the job fine. Just remember that they only do one chain size, so make sure you get the one to match your chain.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Alexandra Vic
    Age
    64
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    2,537

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    Some people who do not understand the basic principles of sharpening and have used them as a counter to learning the methods of doing it properly have fairly destroyed chains in about 6 'sharpenings' because the figured that the sharpener couldn't get it wrong. Did funny things like rounding out the edge of the gullet, instead of sharpening it, getting the rakers all wrong, uneven sharpening of the cutters so they are all random lengths and only a few in the chain would cut. Admittedly, if you gave them a pair of files and left them to it, they would have done the same or worse. Moral of the story - no matter how sweet the gizmo is, it isn't going to work well if you cannot understand the result you are trying achieve.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
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    59
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    12,750

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    I lent my li'l one out to a mate under the misapprehension he was familiar with CS's.

    He sharpened it with a 2-in-1 but from what I can tell he had no clue how to set it up.

    On return he complained that the chain was buggered and wouldn't cut no matter how he sharpened it...

    ...and he was right. I dunno how he managed it, but instead of filing into the gullet he'd managed to file straight down towards the bar, almost to the rivets in several places. >wince<

    The moral? Make sure you understand how the geometry works before you fiddle with it. If you don't know how to hand sharpen, adding power will just screw things up quicker!
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    Are you sure it was a Stihl 2 in 1?

    As the guides sit on top of the teeth and the files are fixed in the assembly (which effectively means they are fixed to the guides), I can’t understand how he could file down towards the bar?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    Bought my Stihl 2 in 1 yesterday and what a little gem it is.

    We had two 10 meter Yukkas removed a month ago - one with two stems and one with 5. Stumps were left as there was no room to stump grind. One, in a raised bed, had to go.

    IMG_0400.jpg

    Stump - ruler is 300mm

    IMG_0398.jpg



    Going ------------
    DFFEF0C0-551F-4CC8-8413-3BCD58945A61.jpeg


    Going ----------

    IMG_0444.jpg


    Gone!!-----------

    IMG_0447 (2).jpg

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
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    59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lappa View Post
    Are you sure it was a Stihl 2 in 1?

    As the guides sit on top of the teeth and the files are fixed in the assembly (which effectively means they are fixed to the guides), I can’t understand how he could file down towards the bar?
    Inspecting my chain, I'd say that he used the wrong size (I'd guess a 5mm... the chain on the li'l gal is 1/8") and also used a 'rocking' motion.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
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    I have a lot of chainsaws at work, and we bought quite a few of those 2 in 1's. I was initially really impressed as it meant people who weren't that experienced could get a reasonable finish. Personally I like a traditional setup with the standard file guides they supply with the saw. As BobL says, the rakers are often very conservatively reduced by those fiddly raker guides they given, and if your flat file is a bit blunt it is a frustrating excercise. I use a finisher or a sanding disc on a small grinder to round the rakers over and reduce them quickly. Bobl, while i do this for myself, I am a bit nervous about doing it for others and encouraging it, as supposedly it makes the chance of kickback higher, especially if someone inadvertently bumps the tip of the saw on a log when sawing. The other issue with grinding the rakers too aggressively is that the saw can bog down, as it is biting more wood than it can handle if you aren't careful. But that is easily managed by being a bit light on the pressure

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