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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Townsville. Tropical Nth Qld.
    Posts
    765

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Pcd-gt isn't wrong with the CA glue.

    Some time back I had a bad accident on the lathe. Split a bowl in two. One half hit me in the face, breaking my nose in two places and tearing the left side open from my bridge to the cheek and the right slashed open. It was a bad accident.

    Workshop looked like a murder scene. At the hospital they cleaned me up, opened up the wounds and litterally glued me back together. No stitches! All glue!

    The doc was using CA and I told her I could have brought mine... For I was using it on the bowl to cure the cracks No doubt their stuff was "better" she retorted.

    Good story, for now I'm as handsome as ever and one is hard pressed to see any injury at all.

    I was told by a military friend that they use CA and suger if they are caught in the rough.
    Quote Originally Posted by aitch View Post
    I have suffered this in the past but since learning the woodworking trick of using superglue on the area all is well. A couple of drops is all it takes. Instant relief - keeps the air out of the cut and by the time it wears off the wound is healed. Simples.
    Not sure what CA you guys are using, but I had a fresh cut on my finger and accidentally got the cheap shop CA glue on it and when the glue hit the blood, it burnt like hell. I seem to remember Daisensi saying the medical stuff is a different checical compound to the cheap stuff, so be careful.
    Rgds,
    Crocy.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    68

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    Actually, it's not hard to acquire mutton fat at all. Get some lamb midloin chops or forequarter chops, and bake them in the oven or under the grill, with the chops resting on a mesh rack, and with a sheet of aluminium foil spread in the tray underneath.
    Not only do you end up with yummy, tasty chops - you end up with a pretty sizeable amount of fat sitting in the foil! Don't forget the roast vegies to go with them, of course!
    Pour the liquid fat off into a dish or jar, while its warm and pourable, before it sets hard, and hey presto, you have a reasonable starter supply of sheep fat. I use it to season my camp ovens.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    68

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    The chemists have Liquid Skin Sport - which I note is only cyanoacrylate anyway - the major constituent of Super Glue. I also note they warn about not using it, if you're "allergic to cyanoacrylate".

    https://www.chemistwarehouse.com.au/...uid-skin-sport

    I just had a "light bulb" moment, and remembered SWMBO has a can of Elastoplast Spray Plaster.
    This stuff is great, it's effectively Band-Aids in a spray can. It leaves a transparent, rubbery, flexible coating, which is pretty impervious for a couple of days.

    The ingredients in the can of this product, that I have at hand, are "Acrylic copolymer, ethyl acetate, pentane, menthol and carbon dioxide". I presume the CO2 is the propellant.
    However, when I track the product down on chemist websites, it says the ingredients are now, "Acrylic copolymer, polyurethane polymer, ethanol, water, dimethylether". So I guess the formulation must have changed recently.

    https://www.yourchemistshop.com.au/e...11870000499015

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    2,882

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    Well, there we go! Next time we lascerate ourselves or experience mayhem, one only needs to reach for the can of medical magic spray.

    Like Star Trek! Next it will heal burns

    Nice!

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    68

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    Actually, if you want to heal burns - I can testify on oath to the stunning, burn-healing power, of neat, pure Lavender Oil.
    Keep a bottle handy in the shop, and slosh it on next time you seriously singe yourself - and keep sloshing it on until the pain subsides, in about 10 mins.
    Repeat the oil application every half hour or so for the next few hours, and you will then be staggered at how rapidly the burn will heal, with no blistering.

    Gattefossé’s burn – Robert Tisserand

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,541

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    The cheapest thing for burns is cold water. Now when I burn myself I get it under the tap and run it for 20 minutes. If you are close to ice then make an ice water mix and it cuts the time in half.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    68

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    Cold water might be cheap - but pure Lavender Oil isn't in the least expensive - and once you use Lavender Oil on burns, you will never go back to using just cold water.
    Of course, I'm talking about small 1st and 2nd degree burns - 3rd degree burns with deeply charred flesh, require immediate and intensive medical attention.
    Interestingly, some hospitals are already using Lavender Oil as a burns treatment.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4

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    I 3rd the Heal Balm get the Gold one.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    12,794

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    He. I thought I'd replied to this already, but looking back...

    I use Rawleigh's Antiseptic Salve. (Gold Tin) Works like a charm on split/chapped skin and minor burns. Costs a small fortune for what it is, but I think our current tin has lasted me... 10 years, around about(?) and I have visited that tin many, many times.

    Relying on a wood fire for heating means splinters, minor burns, etc. on too damned close to a daily basis in the cold/wet season.

    Labelled with "Active constituents: Colophony 13.7% Cresol 1%" and I suspect the balance is plain old petroleum jelly. Nevertheless, it does seem to help healing while also providing a protective barrier. For minor ailments.

    For badly cracked skin or small cuts/nicks that penetrate past skin-deep, I'm also a fan of CA. It's a pity that I've developed enough of a minor allergy to the stuff that I'm parsimonious about using it now.

    I believe this was caused by over-exposure to the fumes... over-did using it as a finish, I think. I certainly cannot use it as a finish any more.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Riverhills, Brisbane
    Age
    60
    Posts
    1,142

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    Those creams from the chemist are pricey per gram. When I did a treatment of Efudix for surface sun spots on my arms, I eased the cracking by using Deri-Sel from the local vet/produce store. It's for cracked teats on cows.....works a treat.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    US
    Posts
    1,261

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    Quote Originally Posted by skot View Post
    Those creams from the chemist are pricey per gram. When I did a treatment of Efudix for surface sun spots on my arms, I eased the cracking by using Deri-Sel from the local vet/produce store. It's for cracked teats on cows.....works a treat.
    A lot of the tit creams here have been turned into medicines for people, too. OTC stuff.

    That's cow tits, of course. They're pretty much just all moisture barriers, some with medication and some not.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia.
    Posts
    68

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    Colophony. You wouldn't want to get tongue-tied saying that word, would you. It could end up sounding very similar to a rear-end inspection.

    I find that Colophony is also known as rosin - in other words, pine wood oleoresin. Pretty fancy name for pine resin, I wonder who thought that one up?

    Never thought about looking in a veterinary supply store for products to stop cow teat cracking. But it looks like others have cottoned onto the idea.

    https://udderlysmooth.com/

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    US
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    1,261

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    I just cooked a batch of varnish and used damar and calophony (and pine turps - true turpentine was hard to find (the kind that smells like fresh pine when you open the bottle)!! I had to go to a health food supplier to get it).

    It was sticky!!!! IIRC, it melted at a pretty low point, but I don't know if that was a touchable temperature, but it would also dissolve into a solvent and maybe an oil. The stickiness would probably make it a great moisture barrier.

    Now I've seen it!! At first, I was surprised that people would use turpentine in the bath, but now the resins, too!!

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