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  1. #31
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    Nov 2007
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    Mt Crosby, Brisbane
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    2,529

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    I absolutely would not plant natives and especially gums.


    20 years ago I made the mistake of not mowing down a few blue gums that stuck their heads up near my house. They are now 100 ft tall and even a big branch falling will be chaos. I can't cut them without going begging to council for permission.


    It is utterly vile that fanatic greenies and AH governments have shifted the burden of carbon sinks and such to private land holders with no compensation.


    If you do plant natives at least plant non gums. They are an invasive weed that has been systematically crowding out other native species for 100,000 years. The only good gum is a dead gum.

    I have planted 100s of no eucalyptus natives on my land over the years but for the most part in places where they don't cause problems.

    2c
    I'm just a startled bunny in the headlights of life. L.J. Young.
    We live in a free country. We have freedom of choice. You can choose to agree with me, or you can choose to be wrong.
    Wait! No one told you your government was a sitcom?

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    72
    Posts
    10,107

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    Quote Originally Posted by damian View Post
    I absolutely would not plant natives and especially gums.


    20 years ago I made the mistake of not mowing down a few blue gums that stuck their heads up near my house. They are now 100 ft tall and even a big branch falling will be chaos. I can't cut them without going begging to council for permission.


    It is utterly vile that fanatic greenies and AH governments have shifted the burden of carbon sinks and such to private land holders with no compensation.


    If you do plant natives at least plant non gums. They are an invasive weed that has been systematically crowding out other native species for 100,000 years. The only good gum is a dead gum.

    I have planted 100s of no eucalyptus natives on my land over the years but for the most part in places where they don't cause problems.

    2c
    Damian

    I have always considered these issues you mention are more to do with planting in inappropriate places: Such as too close to housing or trees that are too large for the average back yard. In their proper place gums are fine. I am not aware of any studies that have shown Eucalypts crowding out other species. Perhaps you have other information. The definition of a weed is "a plant that grows out of place." In fact imported species are more likely to become a weed than the natives.

    However, I do sympathise with the problems of removing trees. I would suggest that a letter to council establishing that a tree needs to be removed for safety (danger to housing or people) and that failure to grant permission will hold them liable should give you a little more leverage. Once in writing, they can't deny liability.

    Regards
    Paul

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,389

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    Ok next Big(well actually a small one but,sharp) question, we will be using Fire wood too keep warm during those delightful winter months that i hate with more passion than i hate lying Politicians kissing kids.

    Have found the local Fire wood delivery people, but on the chance Sal wants too see me Man it up, i may need to split the odd piece of fire wood,or that may be split it.

    Last time I was asked to split an stack fire wood i was 14 an doing it for Love of a grandmother.

    An the implements of War were provided.

    So whats a half decent brand for a Axe hunter, Im not going too be looking at becoming the next Australian axe champion by any stretch of anyones imagination, so you may leave those jokes on the Keyboard.

    Cheers Matt.

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Warburton, Vic
    Age
    52
    Posts
    13,569

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    For splitting I’d go with either Fiskers X25 or X27.
    Cheers

    DJ

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Craigieburn
    Posts
    102

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    Matt, save the back and invest in a log splitter. Cost a couple bucks, but you be using an engine coupled to hydraulic cylinder to do the heavy work. Nothing like a family afternoon together splitting the firewood for future use.

    Cheers Nifty.

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    East of Melbourne Aus.
    Age
    71
    Posts
    1,174

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    One sheep can be called BBQ, another can be called Roast.
    I am learning, slowley.

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    6,389

    Default Suburban Kids,buy Large paddock with Know idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nifty Nev View Post
    Matt, save the back and invest in a log splitter. Cost a couple bucks, but you be using an engine coupled to hydraulic cylinder to do the heavy work. Nothing like a family afternoon together splitting the firewood for future use.

    Cheers Nifty.
    Nifty,

    Most fire wood Ive seen is delivered, I split all ready Ie not round.
    So will only be using the axe Occasionally, well i hope so[emoji6].

    Cheers Matt.

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJs Timber View Post
    For splitting Id go with either Fiskers X25 or X27.
    Thanks DJ,

    Will look into them.

    Cheers Matt.

  10. #39
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    390

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    +1 for Nifty's suggestion, a log splitter is the bees knees. You will find that you will go through a lot of wood to keep you warm over winter living there full time and the cost of buying in split wood will add up. If you end up using any fallen timber from your property unless it is straight grained an axe is no fun. Having a log splitter opens up the opportunity of buying in loads of logs and splitting it yourself.

  11. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    East of Melbourne Aus.
    Age
    71
    Posts
    1,174

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    Plant a few, about 25 Tasmanian blue gums away from your sheds and house. In 10 years you will have firewood for ever.
    I am learning, slowley.

  12. #41
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sth Gippsland Vic
    Posts
    3,464

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    The most comfortable way to go would be to super insulate the dwelling . Double glazing and all that. Get a decent petrol powered log splitter and have a decent Aussie made wood heater installed. With proper insulation and gap sealing your wood heating needs would be half that without it.
    forget an open fire . You probably realize that would double your wood heating needs. The cost of buying in split dry wood is pretty shocking. I don't have to do that which was one reason I bought this place. Lots of wood.
    We have a Nectre heater which is great. And an Oregan wood splitter which I think is good as well. No double glazing though.
    I have the capability to re make all windows to take double glazed inserts but what a job that would be ! Maybe one set at a time will be the way one day.
    When we moved here there was an open fire. That needed wood by the barrow load to heat the living area. We took it out after the first two winters, which increased the living area and added two large sets of single glazed windows to it as well.

  13. #42
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    390

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    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    have a decent Aussie made wood heater installed. ... We have a Nectre heater which is great.
    My experience is that you need a heater that will burn through the night. When I purchased a new heater from Pivot over 10 years ago most manufacturers were claiming an 8 hour burn time, I opted for a Lopi which claimed a 10 hour burn time. My logic being that burn times are a function of the quality of the wood being burnt and no doubt they rate on optimum conditions so I went with the 10 hour rating thinking that 8 hours should be achievable. So far so good and pretty much getting 10 hours, enough coals in the morning to get it going again without the need for kindling. Admittedly I am burning sugar gum which is brilliant but certainly not cheap.

  14. #43
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    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,389

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    So I think I should seriously consider not getting Sal that fancy Ironing board cover as a house warming present.

    An get her that Fancy axe DJ posted about.

    Thoughts??

    The Gutless one.

  15. #44
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    May 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    390

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    So I think I should seriously consider not getting Sal that fancy Ironing board cover as a house warming present. An get her that Fancy axe DJ posted about.
    Who said romance was dead?

  16. #45
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    little Hampton
    Posts
    124

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    A splitter is a no brainer for me if you are looking to cut and split your own wood, have been using my neighbours and am now looking to purchase one myself, his is a 30T log Dog and has no issues splitting some serious pieces of Red Gum so will probably look a bit more closely at that one. We had a number of branches and trees come down in last years storms which we have cut into round and there is no way I'll be splitting all of that manually. Imagine Wedderburn is a bit warmer than the Trentham area in which I live but we get through 12-15 Cubic Meters of fire wood ever year, the fire is on 24/7 from April to November, you may not use that much but is still a lot of wood to cut and chop so as others have said save your back and invest in a splitter.

    Double glazing and proper insulation is also a must for me and given building code energy efficiency provisions these days you will probably need to install anyway, when we bought our weatherboard house it had uninsulated timber floors, single glazed aluminium windows, and scant roof insulation....the house was freezing in winter regardless of how many heaters we had going and was really starting to wonder if we had made the right decision to move up here. We then installed underfloor insulation, double glazing, and roof insulation and can now easily keep the house warm with half the amount of heating. With red gum firewood now going for over $200.00 a cube is saving us money as well.

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