Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 34
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default Another roadside rescue

    Scored another little chair for rejuvenation, but after disassembly it seems the only parts wirth keeping are the legs and back bone!!??? So am thinking I might just use as a template not sure. I'm sure I can replace the rotten parts (the seat base frame) and just go to town with the sander. Anyway it's a bit easier than my others currently in the works. I will also use seat webbing this time instead of heian straps, springs and a ton of cotton wadding.

    IMG_4376.jpg
    Sorry about side on shot.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    I ace decided to replace the arms and feet with Jarrah, and instead of Dowling, I am rounding over the corners. Here's the arms before I shape the round.

    IMG_4434.jpg IMG_4435.jpg
    Again apologies for the side view.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Here are some more updated photo's of the replicated curved arms and the Tapering jig I made.
    I also though I would get creative and make a foot stool to match, so will post photos shortly.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Well, today wasn't such a good day, I was sanding the above mentioned chair arms and had discussed with a colleague about putting a spline through the joint as 1. To add strength, 2. Adds a feature. Anyway I discarded the idea as the test piece I made out of scrap 42x19 was unbreakable, this however was not the case with the Jarrah. One broke right across the joint. So I have managed to glue it back together and will consult as to whether to put Japanese tapered pegs in or a regular spline. I'll probably put the spline due to awkward angle needed for the drill. But my next issue, do I use Jarrah and hide/blend the spline or a pale timber for contrast feature.

    anyway I will post some pics of my decision later.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Well, after one arm snapping at the glued joint, I employed some splines of Tassie oak, decided on a feature style, which I am now incorporating in the feet. So here are 3 pics, of the splines and now ready for spraying.

    IMG_4465.jpg IMG_4466.jpg IMG_4487.jpg

    Sorry about the rotated last photo.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    12,808

    Default

    Looking good!

    It's going to be interesting seeing how the finished version compares to the original photo.

    New and improved? I think so...
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc (AKA "Ghost who posts." )

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skew ChiDAMN!! View Post
    Looking good!

    It's going to be interesting seeing how the finished version compares to the original photo.

    New and improved? I think so...
    Cheers Skew, you bet, as I have made a foot stool to match. and loving all things continuity related I have put Tassie oak splines in the feet also.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    IMG_4499.jpgArms and feet ready for spraying. Just using a clear polyurethane gloss.

    and I made a webbing stretcher tool this afternoon so getting one step closer. Best I get the wife ready with the sewing machine.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    I may getting ready to attach the webbing the to seat base and back, how tight/taught should I pull the webbing? I'd like the chair to be comfortable and thought that if I stretched the webbing to its maximum, it would be quite stiff, almost like a dining chair.

    is there trick or certain tension I should stretch the webbing to?

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    What sort of webbing are you using ?
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Arron, Black and blue elastic webbing from Spotlight, both 3 core I believe, the black is not as stretchy s the blue.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    I looked at the webbing in spotlight a while back and it was 3 core. Thatís too soft. It will disappoint. Upholstery is a time consuming business so if you are going to do all that work then you need to get the foundation right. Get some quality webbing, graded for seats, which will be 4 core. There are a couple of online upholstery suppliers who are both very good.

    I wouldnít use that black webbing on a seat. Maybe on a chair back if it was a dining chair with a vertical back. The blue 3 core is fine for a dining chair back but not for a chair seat. For an easy chair like you are doing, the back is kind of a cross between a back and a seat in terms of weight distribution, so I would use 4 core on both seat and back.

    In terms of how much stretch, I donít know of any formula, but you need a lot. More than an average person could apply without a webbing stretcher. There is virtually no chance of making a seat too stiff using elastic webbing, no matter what you do.

    The problem with all webbing is they are limited lifespan, compared to springs, but I agree that given the value of the chair and the fact that this is a learning experience then webbing is probably the right way to go.

    Donít forget to round off any sharp edges which might come in contact with the webbing and wear through it. Also, use a layer of hessian, nice and tight, over the webbing so it doesnít cut into the foam.

    Cheers
    Arron
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Well that puts a spanner in the works, thanks for the advice, although I will stick with what I have bought as it'll be good practice. I will get some hessian though and see how I go. I have made a webbing stretcher so can get it nice and taught.

    i doubt it will get sat in much as the wife won't sit down unless she's sick, so will probably use it as a clothes horse as going in the bedroom corner.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    Fair enough, if it’s mainly a learning experience then use what you have to hand.

    Cheers
    Arron
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Thanks, and thanks again for the advice.

    Richard

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Roadside Pickups
    By turnerted in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 5th Apr 2016, 11:07 PM
  2. Roadside timber - Vic ash?
    By Timmymacca in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17th Aug 2014, 09:53 PM
  3. Roadside chuckout
    By Burnsy in forum SMALL TIMBER MILLING
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 23rd Apr 2009, 07:48 PM
  4. roadside collection?
    By weisyboy in forum NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH WOODWORK
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 3rd Apr 2009, 08:14 PM
  5. Elm on the roadside in Williamstown
    By thumbsucker in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11th May 2008, 06:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •