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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,351

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    Fitting one of these or similar is the best way to slow you machine, allows stitch by stitch up to full speed, once you have changed to a servo motor you will never look back, I have the previous model of this on my K6 and it handles it with no problems
    Servo Motors
    201k is a excellent machine the best smoothest quietest domestic Singer ever built however it not classed as a industrial machine

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    NSW
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,573

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    Not just the machine, but using the right needles makes a huge difference too!
    I've hemmed my daughter's jeans on a $80 Spotlight Elna, once I learned about
    a) the intricacies of the various needle point/eye geometries, and
    b) using a lump hammer vigorously to flatten the multiple layers of denim before sewing.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    2,954

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    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Fitting one of these or similar is the best way to slow you machine, allows stitch by stitch up to full speed, once you have changed to a servo motor you will never look back, I have the previous model of this on my K6 and it handles it with no problems
    Servo Motors
    201k is a excellent machine the best smoothest quietest domestic Singer ever built however it not classed as a industrial machine
    Iím at a disadvantage with the Servo motor solution because Iíve never actually used one or known someone who has, and before proceeding to spend what will likely work out to be $500 (I think $600 with synchroniser) Iíd need to be confident that it really can do stitch by stitch. By that I mean do one stitch, stop with needle down, allow me to reposition the fabric for as long as I want, then do one more stitch etc.

    I have heard that the cheaper types of Servo really only allow you to sew very slowly, and without a synchroniser there is no way to control needle stop up or down. By Ďcheaperí Iím talking about the Chinese ones on EBay for about $140.

    So, being cautious with money I did what I could cheaply, I changed the pulley to 45mm (from Hong Kong, not available locally) and modified the actuator arm so that it is much longer and fixes to the lhs of the foot pedal. This slows it down but it doesnít really make the start softer, as the friction/inertia needed to start is not changed, so the first stitch or two lack proper control. Then it settles down and can sew very very slowly. Mine is a walking foot so there is probably more inertia involved in starting then a straight sewer.

    Have you used a Servo and therefore be able to comment on this?
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Katoomba NSW
    Posts
    4,300

    Default

    I have an Efka servo on my Consew 226R walking foot. I can sew stitch by stitch but i repurposed the Efka off a Juki straight sewer and it has a needle position synchroniser. I really like the needle position functions. I have it set to stop with the needle down so I can reposition the work piece. If i press down with my heel it lifts the needle to the top position so I can remove the work piece. With the knee lifter on the presser foot it makes for excellent work flow.
    Even if the Chinese servos only allow you to sew very slowly you could do the stitch by stitch bits manually. I often manually walk the foot over lumpy seams.
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    "just because I donít need the lathe doesnít mean the beer isnít cold" - Grand Master Flett

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    129

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arron View Post
    Iím glad you did respond - Iím interested in this Singer 201k. When you say it is operated by either treadle or motor, do you mean that on your machine you can swap between driving the machine by either foot treadle or motor as required?

    I have an industrial machine that I use for upholstery (hobby) and Iíve done what I can to slow it down and itís not bad for most uses but Iíd love something that could go Ďstitch by stitchí for the more complicated stuff. I can hand crank my machine but that requires me to take one hand off the workpiece, not always possible, so being able to crank by foot would be ideal. Nonetheless, it must be able to run by motor for most of the time.

    Cheers
    Arron
    Hi Arron,

    Yes, I can swap between electric or treadle on the Singer 201K. However, it's not just a simple matter of throwing a lever or anything like that. If electric is to be used you slip the treadle belt off the large flywheel inside the cabinet so the treadle is disengaged. To switch back to using treadle you need to place the belt back onto the treadle flywheel, it's not difficult to do. It's a lovely smooth machine in either mode.

    I suppose you could leave the treadle belt on but it would mean the treadle would be constantly engaged and would probably put too much strain on the electric motor. I've never tried it like that.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arose62 View Post
    Not just the machine, but using the right needles makes a huge difference too!
    I've hemmed my daughter's jeans on a $80 Spotlight Elna, once I learned about
    a) the intricacies of the various needle point/eye geometries, and
    b) using a lump hammer vigorously to flatten the multiple layers of denim before sewing.
    I hem my own jeans on my old Singer. It has no real problem with the several layers of denim so I've never had to resort to flattening with a hammer. One thing I did learn regarding needles (after much swearing and cursing) is that you must insert the needle into the machine the RIGHT way around! I assumed the flat side of the needle would face the thumbscrew but this is not so with my Singer, the flat side faces way from the screw. You wouldn't believe how detrimental it can be to your mental state if you get that little detail wrong.

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