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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Default Australian Woods in Europe

    Hi to all, fine forums.

    Anyone know of suppliers of Australian hardwoods in Europe?

    Been wanting to work Australian woods for over 20 years and now it's getting to be about that time. The trouble is that I'm Europe and have so far found only one source of tiny turning stock.

    Big fan of very hard woods- working Kwila with hand tools at the moment, it's a real pleasure (great wood for fine joints) but have an ache for working some woods that are more like bone, or stone.

    Thanks in advance and take care,

    -Cameron Bobro

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cowra - Central West NSW
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    Default

    Sounds like you enjoy sharpening.
    Next step up for you might be some Jarrah, then some Blackbutt, and top it of with some Iron Bark.
    The last two we don't sell as they are too hard for average-joe.

    Welcome to the forum,
    Steven Thomas


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Slovenia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lumber Bunker View Post
    Sounds like you enjoy sharpening.
    Next step up for you might be some Jarrah, then some Blackbutt, and top it of with some Iron Bark.
    The last two we don't sell as they are too hard for average-joe.

    Welcome to the forum,
    Thanks for the welcome, it's a lot of fun reading the posts here.

    Sharpening? Nothing special, I think working hard woods is in the "stance" and a kind of sweeping motion or something, just copied my dad.

    According to the Janka scala, Merbau (Kwila) is a little harder than Jarrah, but in my experience the Janka scale doesn't precisely indicate real-life "hardness", which involves resilience, gumminess, brittleness, etc. etc. Besides, every tree differs, even in itself.

    Hmmm... looking at these Janka ratings, it seems that I've worked
    a fair amount of the "hardest" woods, including Bloodwood. Machining some trinkets out of Lignum Vitae and ebony doesn't count, might as well have been brass, or soap, in those cases. I'm looking for specific properties, suitable for fine, even delicate, exposed (and glueless) joinery. Like making a flower that you can stand on.

    Sawed and split some blue gum eucalyptus for firewood some 20 years ago. It was cracked to all hell but remembering the feel of that wood is what got me googling for "australian timber".

    I see you have a timber business, looking good. May have to wind up importing myself, used to be a crazy experience but the country I live in is in the EU now so it must be doable.

    take care,

    -Cameron Bobro

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Dundowran Beach
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    19,923

    Thumbs up Bobro must be a hard case

    To tackle things he has little idea of!
    Welcome to the forum Bobro!
    Woul you like to try some really hard timber? I'm sure everyone has their own suggestions but mine is Black Gidgee!

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